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Illinois CWD confirmed in Will County deer

Posted Feb 08 2014 12:28pm
CWD confirmed in Will County deer

 
Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014 10:51 am

CWD confirmed in Will County deer Robert Themer rthemer@daily-journal.com

The first case of chronic wasting disease in a deer in Will County was reported Thursday — the result of testing of a deer killed in the Kankakee Sands Preserve between Braidwood and Wilmington.
The deer was killed Dec. 10 in the culling program by the Forest Preserve District of Will County to control population density at the preserve.
 As a result of the CWD confirmation, the Illinois Department of Natural Resources has requested culling an additional 20 deer from Kankakee Sands and adjacent preserves south of Illinois Route 113 and west of the Kankakee River, the FPD announced.DNR also will be culling deer on property it owns at the adjacent Wilmington Shrub Prairie. Its policy when confirming CWD is to remove more deer from the area to maintain deer herd health and reduce the spread of the degenerative neural disease.If additional deer test positive, their meat will be disposed of. If they test negative, the carcasses will be sent to a processor and the meat donated to a food bank, as is done with other culled deer. DNR will pay for processing or disposal, according to Marcy DeMauro, the forest district executive director.DNR's request for additional deer culling in the Kankakee Sands region will be considered at the Feb. 13 Forest Preserve Board meeting.The forest district's winter culling plan called for reduction of the Kankakee Sands deer herd by 21. District biologists estimate that DNR's decision to cull 20 more will result in a population of about 23 deer per square mile in the Sands area, which would meet the district plan of maintaining a range of 20-30 deer per square mile.CWD infected deer have been confirmed previously in counties adjacent to Will County, but not in the county itself.Since CWD testing began in Illinois, 408 deer have been confirmed with the disease in 11 years — the bulk of them in the Wisconsin border counties of Winnebago (Rockford) with 145 and Boone (Belvidere) 127. DeKalb County, south of Boone, has had 50.Adjacent to Will County, and not far west of Kankakee Sands, Grundy County has had 10 confirmed cases in the past three years, three of them last year. Kendall and DuPage counties, also adjacent to Will, each had one last year.CDW has been confirmed in a dozen northern Illinois counties, with Will, Grundy and LaSalle the farthest south. http://www.daily-journal.com/sports/outdoors/cwd-confirmed-in-will-county-deer/article_64696c9b-8837-5273-8bba-8b0d62fd2105.html      Dec 2013 -Jan 2014 Late Winter/CWD Deer Seasons   http://www.dnr.illinois.gov/hunting/Documents/LateWinterDeerSeasonMap.pdf      From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
 
Illinois Chronic Wasting Disease: 2012-2013 Surveillance and Management Report Paul Shelton and Patrick McDonald Forest Wildlife Program, Illinois Department of Natural Resources August 30, 2013
 
Background
 
First CWD positive: A suspect adult female deer from northwest Boone County was diagnosed with CWD in November 2002, after exhibiting clinical signs that included food impaction, aspiration pneumonia, and behavioral abnormalities.
 
Total samples through June 30, 2012: 66,045+
 
Total positives through June 30, 2012: 372
 
Number of counties affected through June 30, 2012:
 
10 (JoDaviess, Stephenson, Winnebago, Boone, McHenry, Ogle, DeKalb, Kane, LaSalle, Grundy)
 
Distribution through June 30, 2012:
 
90% of positives were found in the four original CWD counties (Winnebago, Boone, McHenry, and DeKalb), while 2 of those counties (Winnebago and Boone) accounted for 71% of positives. The outbreak consisted of a central core of disease along the Winnebago‐Boone county line, with more diffuse distribution at increasing distance from that area (Fig. 1).
 
 
Fig. 1. Historical distribution of CWD‐infected deer identified in Illinois as of June 30, 2012.
 
CWD Surveillance Protocols During FY2012‐2013 (July 1, 2012‐June 30, 2013)
 
Testing: All CWD testing was conducted using immunohistochemistry (IHC) at Illinois Department of Agriculture’s (IDOA) Animal Disease Laboratory in Galesburg, Illinois. Samples were initially screened using retropharyngeal lymph nodes (RPLN), followed by confirmatory testing of recut RPLN tissue and obex.
 
Sampling of hunter‐harvested deer: Three sources were used to provide tissue samples from adult deer harvested by hunters: (1) mandatory firearm deer check stations in high‐risk counties in northern Illinois; (2) designated voluntary drop‐off testing locations in northern Illinois; and (3) cooperating meat lockers/taxidermists who collected heads/sample tissues for IDNR.
 
Surveillance by other agencies/individuals authorized by special permits: Recipients of special permits from IDNR authorizing lethal deer removals were required to collect CWD samples when working in high‐risk CWD areas or in areas needing additional surveillance. These permits included (1) Deer Population Control Permits (used by some agencies to control urban deer populations); (2) nuisance Deer Removal Permits (for crop depredation, etc.); and (3) Scientific Permits (various research projects).
 
Suspect (“target”) deer surveillance: Upon receiving reports from the public about sick deer, IDNR staff collected samples for CWD testing from deer that exhibited signs/symptoms consistent with chronic wasting disease. Surveillance from post‐hunting season sharpshooting: Sharpshooting was conducted from mid‐January through the end of March by trained IDNR staff. Sharpshooting was restricted to areas where CWD‐infected deer had been identified (limited to lands within a 2‐section buffer around known positive sections).
 
CWD Surveillance Results FY2012‐2013
 
Total number of CWD samples collected statewide: 8,069. Figure 3 compares our yearly collection efforts; Appendix A summarizes the samples collected/positives identified by county and collection source.
 
Number of usable samples collected: 8,064
 
Number of CWD‐positive deer identified: 36. Table 1 presents a comparison of the number of positive deer found each year by county.
 
Number of counties with positive deer: 12 — Boone (4), DeKalb (7), DuPage (1), Grundy (3), JoDaviess (1), Kane (4), Kendall (1), LaSalle (1), McHenry (3), Ogle (3), Stephenson (3), Winnebago (5). For distribution of positive sections, see Figure 5.
 
Number of new CWD counties: 2 — DuPage and Kendall
 
CWD prevalence information for the 12‐county CWD area (adult deer from hunting sources only) —
 
Average CWD prevalence (all adult deer): 0.54% (20/3702)
 
Average CWD prevalence (adult males): 0.52% (10/1919)
 
Average CWD prevalence (adult females): 0.56% (10/1783)
 
 
 
Fig. 2. Distribution of CWD sampling effort in Illinois counties during FY2012‐2013 (all sources).
 
snip...
 
 
Figure 7. Number of deer counted during aerial censuses and removed by sharpshooters in CWD‐affected areas of northern Illinois during winter 2012‐2013. Totals reflect number counted/culled within the shaded flight boundary.
 
Discussion: Illinois CWD in FY2012‐2013 Thirty‐six CWD‐positive deer were identified from 8,064 usable samples collected statewide. Estimated prevalence rates in the CWD counties remained low, with an overall rate of 0.54% in the 12‐county area. There has been no increasing trend in CWD prevalence since 2002 (Fig. 8), in contrast with increasing prevalence trends observed in many other states where chronic wasting disease has been found. Estimated prevalence rates in the original four CWD counties have averaged about 2.5 times higher than in the 12‐county area during this period. There are some specific local areas of concern in Illinois. These include (1) areas in which there is resistance to management (and therefore limited sharpshooting), which has created refuges for sick animals; and (2) recently‐established, outlying disease foci with increasing prevalence rates, in which our initial management approach has typically been limited to a small amount of sharpshooting for follow‐up surveillance after discovery of CWD in the area.
 
Surveillance resulted in identification of positive deer in two new counties this year: a suspect adult female deer near Yorkville in Kendall County in July 2012; and an adult female taken under authority of a Deer Population Control Permit in DuPage County in November 2012.
 
snip...
 
For the second straight year, highest CWD prevalence rates in adult deer (12.77%) were found in Block 2,0, which includes the northwest corner of DeKalb County (Fig. 6). There is opposition to disease management in this area, and the Department has access to only a few properties for sharpshooting, so conditions are unlikely to improve unless additional cooperators can be found. High prevalence was also observed in Block 3,4 (Northeast DuPage County — a new area), but those high rates were due to sample distribution in relation to the block boundaries. After initial detection of the positive deer, additional samples were collected locally for follow‐up evaluation, but the boundary of the block is within a few hundred yards of the positive location, and most follow‐up samples fell into Block 3,3. However, no additional positive deer were found, and most suitable deer habitat in that area falls to the west in Block 3,3.
 
During winter 2012‐13, sharpshooting activities were confined to peripheral areas outside the main disease core, and aimed at preventing disease spread. Many of the sharpshooting locations were ‘spark’ areas, where CWD has been found but is not known to be established. In those locations the primary goal was to gather additional surveillance information to clarify the disease status of the area, rather than to bring about significant population change. Because of this, the number of deer taken at those locations was limited, and sharpshooting ceased when surveillance quotas were reached. Higher numbers of deer were taken from areas which have produced multiple CWD cases, particularly where deer densities are high. Agency sharpshooters removed 661 deer, with an additional 229 removed by permittees with Deer Population Control Permits.
 
snip...
 
In 2013 scientists from the Illinois Natural History Survey, the University of Illinois, Purdue University, and the Department of Natural Resources published the results of a study that examined the effectiveness of the first several years of IDNR’s management program for chronic wasting disease in the northern Illinois deer herd. The paper appears in the Journal of Preventive Veterinary Medicine (Vol. 110: 541‐548), and is available online (without charge) at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/01675877 .
 
The authors concluded that IDNR sharpshooting was associated with a decline in CWD prevalence in the areas where management occurred during the study period. Some other findings of the study included:
 
• In areas with management, declines in CWD prevalence were more consistently observed in young deer than in adults, suggesting that management reduced the risk of new infections;
 
• In areas where no sharpshooting occurred, the odds of a female deer having CWD were about 2.5 times higher than in areas where sharpshooters removed moderate to high numbers of deer (9‐59 deer per section per year). Results for male deer differed somewhat, with lower risk of CWD at different levels of sharpshooting. Additional years of data should help clarify the nature of this relationship;
 
• Deer taken by agency sharpshooters were about twice as likely to be CWD‐positive than deer taken by hunters.
 
The results suggest that frequent and consistent sharpshooting events with at least moderate culling intensity are needed to reduce CWD prevalence.
 
 snip...see full report 15 pages ;
 
 
 
Chronic Wasting Disease Illinois
 
Update July 1, 2013:
 
We now have a total of 408 cases of CWD.
 
Note: Years are reported by fiscal year: 2013 is the period from July 1, 2012 through June 30, 2013, etc.
 
 
 
Illinois CWD-Infected Sections - August 15, 2013
 
 
 
 
CWD Testing Exception for HD Events
 
1
 
Overview
 
A requirement of the federal CWD interim final rule is that every qualifying cervid twelve months of age and older that originates from a herd participating in the CWD Herd Certification Program be sampled and tested for CWD at the time of death. In addition, herd owners enrolled in the program are required to report these deaths to the office of the State Animal Health Official (SAHO).
 
An exception to this requirement can be made by the SAHO in the case of a mass casualty / mortality event such as Hemorrhagic Disease (HD) caused by (Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Virus (EHDV) or bluetongue virus (BTV). In these events, CWD sample collection can be limited to two (2) animals per event. When only two animals are to be sampled, the sample collector will sample the highest risk animals available for testing. This includes older animals, males preferentially over females, and those animals having any known pre-existing health conditions. In addition to the above, since one cannot predict which animals may die during a HD event, all males 4 years of age and older that die during the event must have samples submitted for testing. All animals 12 month or older that die and are in poor body condition must be sampled regardless of the ongoing HD event. All deaths must continue to be reported even if an HD event is ongoing.
 
Definitions
 
HD Event: A HD event is considered to be ongoing when there is acute, mass morbidity / mortality occurring in a herd during the time of year when biting midges are active and a diagnosis of HD has been made in the herd by the herd veterinarian. The event will be considered to be over 10 days after the first killing frost has occurred since the diagnosis was made.
 
Diagnosis: A veterinary diagnosis of HD will be considered to be valid if it meets one of the following criteria:
 
1. The veterinarian has submitted blood samples from one or more animals in the herd and the testing laboratory has confirmed HD infection.
 
2. The veterinarian or herd owner has submitted one or more animals to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory and the laboratory has made the HD diagnosis.
 
3. The veterinarian has submitted tissues from a field necropsy to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory and the laboratory has made the HD diagnosis.
 
 
 
 
 
Dec 2012 -Jan 2013 Late Winter/CWD Deer Seasons
 
 
 
 
 
Basic Information BulletPlaceHolder URL Information Pamphlet on Chronic Wasting Disease CWD Management in Illinois: Fact or Fiction? How/where do I get my deer tested for CWD? Deer hunters: check your test sample results online here Locations of CWD-Positive Deer - Updated 8/15/2013 Chronic Wasting Disease Query System CWD FAQs Administrative Rules Illinois Department of Agriculture
 
 Annual Reports 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003
 
 
 
Greetings Illinois Officials and Hunters et al,
 
amazing, a perfectly good time to test a mass kill event for cwd i.e. during a supposedly ehd outbreak, where 100s of deer are dead at once, a perfect time for cwd testing to find out the real numbers on cwd, and what do they do, regulations call to test only 2 animals. and they call this looking for cwd ??
 
‘’An exception to this requirement can be made by the SAHO in the case of a mass casualty / mortality event such as Hemorrhagic Disease (HD) caused by (Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Virus (EHDV) or bluetongue virus (BTV). In these events, CWD sample collection can be limited to two (2) animals per event.’’
 
absolutely amazing, sad, but amazing.
 
I wish to update you on the CWD science from the PRION2013 congressional abstracts, and other related science on the TSE prion disease.
 
the PRION2013 congressional abstracts on cwd will be toward the bottom, about 3/4 of the way down the page.
 
good luck!
 
kind regards, terry
 
 
 Monday, April 08, 2013
 
Evaluation of a wild white-tailed deer population management program for controlling chronic wasting disease in Illinois, 2003–2008
 
 
 
Wednesday, January 16, 2013
 
Illinois DuPage county deer found with Chronic Wasting Disease CWD
 
 
 
Tuesday, November 13, 2012
 
ILLINOIS CWD UPDATE NOVEMBER 2012
 
 
 
Friday, November 09, 2012
 
Chronic Wasting Disease CWD in cervidae and transmission to other species
 
 
 
Thursday, February 10, 2011
 
CWD ILLINOIS UPDATE FEBRUARY 2011 Locations of CWD-Positive Deer - Updated 2/07/2011
 
 
 
Thursday, January 28, 2010
 
CWD ILLINOIS UPDATE 2010
 
 
 
Saturday, March 08, 2008
 
CWD UPDATE ILLINOIS Stephenson County joins CWD list
 
 
 
From: TSS
 
Subject: 16 MORE CWD DEER CONFIRMED IN ILLINOIS
 
Date: December 23, 2006 at 9:08 am PST
 
Published: December 23, 2006
 
Quick Shots: Outdoors 16 more CWD deer discovered
 
Tests for chronic wasting disease found 16 more confirmed cases in northern Illinois this fall, bringing the total to 163 since the state’s first infected deer was discovered in 2002 near Roscoe.
 
The positive tests came from deer killed by firearm and archery hunters and a few suspicious deer taken by DNR staff.
 
Winnebago and DeKalb counties each had six; Boone County four.
 
All but one case was from deer in previously infected areas. The exception was a deer killed in southern DeKalb County, about seven miles from the LaSalle County line.
 
The state has included southern DeKalb in next month’s special CWD hunt because of the new discovery.
 
The latest positives came from about 2,500 deer. Tests have not been completed on all deer sampled during the firearm seasons.
 
Hunters find more than deer
 
Deer hunters in Michigan, Arkansas and Tennessee found methamphetamine labs or their remnants this season, according to Gannett News Services. Meth is an addictive stimulant made in home labs, which are often hidden in rural settings.
 
Midwest deer harvests increase
 
Midwest states had increased firearm deer harvests this season.
 
Illinois’ total was 115,192 deer, compared with 114,209 last year.
 
Wisconsin’s harvest was 336,211, compared with 325,630 in 2005.
 
Michigan’s harvest was up about 7 percent at about 258,000.
 
Minnesota doesn’t yet have a total but officials expect it to surpass 250,000, which would place it among the state’s five best harvests.
 
Court rules in muted swan fight
 
A District of Columbia Circuit Court of Appeals recently ruled in favor of government agencies’ right to manage muted swans.
 
An animal-rights group contended the swans were protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.
 
Agencies in several states, including Wisconsin, Indiana and Maryland, have been challenged as they try to control muted swan population.
 
The swans are considered destructive to the wetland systems. They also are known to attack nesting native swans and waterfowl.
 
Ringing Salvation Army bell
 
If you’re out doing holiday shopping this morning, stop by the Wal-Mart at Owen Center Road and Riverside Boulevard where I’ll be manning the Salvation Army Christmas kettle from 10 a.m. to noon at the retail entrance.
 
Stop by, say hi and make a donation to a good cause.
 
Last week several readers visited and contributed, including a couple who delivered a cookie tin and sock filled with pennies.
 
Great plate
 
In response to my request for interesting outdoors-related license plates, Register Star copy assistant Gareth Sleger reported spotting this one on an Illinois car: GO FISH. Angler or card player? You decide.
 
If you have or see an interesting outdoors-related plate, contact me at the phone number or e-mail address below.
 
Doug Goodman’s Quick Shots on outdoors appear Saturdays. Contact him at 815-987-1386 or dgoodman@rrstar.com
 
 
 
SEE LATEST MAP DECEMBER 2006
 
 
 
Illinois Chronic Wasting Disease:
 
2005-2006 Surveillance/Management Summary
 
 
 
Published Date: 2006-12-28 00:00:00
 
Subject: PRO/AH/EDR> Chronic wasting disease, cervids - USA (WV, IL)
 
Archive Number: 20061228.3644
 
CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE, CERVIDS - USA (WEST VIRGINIA, ILLINOIS)
 
***********************************************
 
snip...
 
16 more CWD deer discovered
 
-----------------------------------
 
Tests for chronic wasting disease found 16 more confirmed cases in northern Illinois this fall [2006], bringing the total to 163 since the state's 1st infected deer was discovered in 2002 near Roscoe. The positive tests came from deer killed by firearm and archery hunters and a few suspicious deer taken by DNR staff. Winnebago and DeKalb counties each had 6, Boone County 4. All but one case was from deer in previously infected areas. The exception was a deer killed in southern DeKalb County, about 7 miles from the LaSalle County line. The state has included southern DeKalb in next month's [January 2007] special CWD hunt because of the new discovery. The latest positives came from about 2500 deer. Tests have not been completed on all deer sampled during the firearm seasons. Midwest states had increased firearm deer harvests this season. Illinois' total was 115 192 deer, compared with 114 209 last year [2005]. Wisconsin's harvest was 336 211, compared with 325 630 in 2005. Michigan's harvest was up about 7 percent at about 258 000. Minnesota doesn't yet have a total, but officials expect it to surpass 250 000, which would place it among the state's 5 best harvests. [Byline: Doug Goodman ] See Latest Map, December 2006: Illinois Chronic Wasting Disease 2005-2006 Surveillance/Management
 
Summary: . -- Terry S. Singeltary Sr. flounder9@verizon.net [It is interesting that 2 of the 3 states named as having a larger deer harvest have CWD and that the 3rd state's deer have been involved in the tuberculosis outbreak in Michigan. There are no links to indicate that CWD has caused any human health problems. - Mod.TG]
 
 
 
From: TSS
 
Subject: ILLINOIS FINDS 16 MORE CASES OF CWD WITH New cases found in Northern Illinois
 
Date: January 10, 2006 at 11:57 am PST
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE January 9, 2006
 
DEER SEASON SAMPLING FINDS ADDITIONAL EVIDENCE OF CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE New cases found in Northern Illinois
 
SPRINGFIELD, IL. – Sixteen additional cases of chronic wasting disease (CWD) have been detected in northern Illinois through sampling of hunter-harvested deer during the state’s 2005-06 deer seasons. The new cases include two deer taken by hunters in Ogle County, the first time CWD has been detected there.
 
“The Department of Natural Resources continues intensive sampling for CWD as part of our effort to slow the spread of the disease in our wild deer herd,” said Paul Shelton, manager of the IDNR Forest Wildlife Program. “We appreciate the support of hunters who continue to voluntarily allow us to take tissue samples from their deer to test for the disease. The sampling, testing and surveillance is extremely important as we deal with CWD.”
 
Chronic wasting disease was first discovered in Illinois in November 2002 and to date Illinois has detected 112 positive cases.
 
The disease had been confined in northern Illinois in Boone, Winnebago, McHenry and northern DeKalb until the two new cases were detected in nearby Ogle County this winter.
 
“We were somewhat surprised to find these two cases in Ogle County because no cases had been detected there previously despite very intensive sampling,” Shelton said. “We’ve sampled nearly 2,000 deer in Ogle County since 2003 and these are the only two cases we have found there to date. We are still awaiting the results of approximately 350 other samples from Ogle County taken this fall.”
 
Illinois biologists have collected samples from more than 2,500 deer in seven northern Illinois counties so far during the 2005-06 firearm and archery deer seasons and from suspect animals reported to the IDNR.
 
Hunters in Boone, Winnebago and McHenry counties a portion of DeKalb County north of the East-West Tollway will participate in a CWD Deer Season Jan. 13-15 to help control deer densities and the spread of chronic wasting disease. Hunters with unfilled 2005 firearm, muzzleloader or archery deer permits valid for one of the open counties may use those to hunt. Hunters using unfilled permits from the 2005 firearm, muzzleloader or archery season may take deer appropriate for that permit (antlerless-only or either-sex). Special CWD season permits were also issued previously. Check stations will be manned in the four counties and successful hunters who submit samples for CWD testing will be provided with an additional permit valid for the remainder of the season.
 
Confirmed CWD cases by county: Boone-53 Winnebago-42 McHenry-9 Dekalb-6 Ogle-2
 
Check station locations for the CWD Deer Season:
 
Boone County - Boone County Fairgrounds, Rt. 76 and Business Rt. 20, Belvidere. DeKalb County - Potawatomi Woods Forest Preserve, 32199 Kirkland Rd.(one-quarter mile north of Rt. 72), Kirkland. McHenry County - Sportsman’s Choice, intersection of Routes 14 and 47, Woodstock. Winnebago County - Rock Cut State Park, 6425 Hart Rd. (one mile east of Perryville Rd. on Hart Rd.), Loves Park.
 
While not thought to be contagious to humans or livestock, CWD is known to spread from animal to animal among deer and elk. The disease affects the brain of the infected animal, causing it to become emaciated, display abnormal behavior, lose coordination and eventually die.
 
Illinois expanded its chronic wasting disease surveillance effort in 2002 following the discovery of CWD in neighboring Wisconsin. For updated information about CWD, check the IDNR web site at: http://dnr.state.il.us/cwd . Hunters who participated in the CWD sampling can check the status of their deer at this site. Hunters who provided samples from deer that test positive are notified by the IDNR.
 
###
 
 
 
 
From: TSS (216-119-136-42.ipset16.wt.net)
 
Subject: 9 NEW CWD CASES FOUND IN NORTHERN ILLINOIS Date: December 20, 2003 at 6:58 pm PST
 
9 new CWD cases found in northern Illinois DOUG GOODMAN , Rockford Register Star
 
Illinois has nine more confirmed cases of a fatal deer disease first discovered in the state last fall near Roscoe, wildlife officials announced Friday.
 
The new cases were found among 1,100 hunter-harvested deer tested for chronic wasting disease during the first session of the firearm season last month.
 
The latest cases include five in Boone County, three in Winnebago County and the first-ever in DeKalb County. The state now has 30 confirmed cases.
 
Paul Shelton, state Department of Natural Resources wildlife program manager, said the DeKalb deer was killed in the county's northern section near the Kishwaukee River about 20 miles from Roscoe, where the majority of the cases have been found.
 
"It's possible it could have traveled from the Roscoe area," he said. "Or it's possible we could have missed a pocket (of diseased deer) during our sampling where we don't have as high a prevalence of CWD among the deer. When more data comes in, we'll get a clearer picture."
 
The tests also showed CWD in two other new areas -- just west of Rockton and northeastern Boone County. The Rockton case was the first west of Interstate 90, while the earlier Boone cases were all on the western border along Winnebago County.
 
"The numbers in themselves were not surprising. They were in line with what we expected," Shelton said. "More important than the numbers is the distribution of the (positive) samples."
 
The latest results were from tests in Winnebago, Boone, DeKalb, Stephenson, McHenry and Ogle counties.
 
About 3,500 samples were taken during the firearms seasons in northern Illinois, but not all the tests have been completed.
 
Shelton contacted hunters with deer testing positive Wednesday night.
 
He added the DNR appreciates the cooperation hunters have provided during the testing process. "They've been fantastic."
 
Roscoe hunter Jim Hart said CWD has gained a level of acceptance among the majority of his colleagues.
 
"A certain number of hunters have told me they are terrified of (CWD), but most are accepting of it," he said, adding he knows of some hunters who quit the sport this year for fear of the disease.
 
Contact: dgoodman@register
 
startower.com; 815-987-1386.
 
 
 
From: TSS (216-119-136-111.ipset16.wt.net)
 
Subject: Chronic Wasting Disease Surveillance Summary: Status of CWD in Illinois
 
Date: November 10, 2003 at 6:36 am PST
 
Chronic Wasting Disease Surveillance Summary:
 
Status of CWD in Illinois
 
Forest Wildlife Program
 
Illinois Department of Natural Resources
 
October 1, 2003
 
Page 1 of 6
 
Figure 1. Sampling goals and distribution of counties sampled for CWD during the 2002 firearm deer season.
 
Figure 2. Locations (to the nearest section) of CWD-positive deer identified as of February 1, 2003.
 
Background:
 
On November 1, 2002 Illinois Department of Natural Resources officials received confirmation that chronic wasting disease (CWD) in a wild Illinois deer had been found for the first time, the result of routine testing of a suspect animal from Boone County. During the ensuing firearm deer season in November and December, a total of 4,060 samples were taken from hunterharvested deer in 36 Illinois counties (Fig. 1). The following counties were sampled during that season: Adams, Boone, Bureau, Carroll, Clark, Clinton, DeKalb, Effingham, Fayette, Fulton, Hancock, Jefferson, Jo Daviess, Johnson, LaSalle, Lawrence, Macoupin, Madison, Marion, McHenry, McLean, Ogle, Pike, Pope, Randolph, Rock Island, Sangamon, Shelby, St. Clair, Stephenson, Union, Vermilion, Washington, Whiteside, Williamson, and Winnebago. Six additional CWD-positive deer were identified from these samples. Two clusters of infection were identified - one located along the Boone-Winnebago county line northeast of Rockford, and the other southeast of Woodstock in McHenry County (Figure 2).
 
Page 2 of 6
 
Figure 3. Locations (to the nearest section) of deer collected for chronic wasting disease testing after the close of the deer hunting season. Follow-up Surveillance:
 
After identification of those areas in which CWD-positive deer were found, the Department followed up with additional sampling (via sharpshooting) in those two locations so as to better evaluate the status of CWD in the immediate area. Sample locations were limited by the distribution of adequate habitat, by suitability of sites for sharpshooting purposes (i.e., safety), and by the willingness of landowners to allow access. A few additional samples were collected from road-killed deer when found in the vicinity of the core sampling area. In the Winnebago-Boone county area, samples were also taken from a high-density deer herd several miles to the south. DNR staff contacted potential landowners, both private and public, in an effort to gain access to suitable properties. Sampling commenced on February 6 and continued through March 31. Sharpshooting was normally conducted from late afternoon throughout the night (but varied by site) by staff of USDA-APHIS Wildlife Services and IDNR.
 
Samples were collected and tested from 185 deer, including 62 from Boone County, 29 from McHenry County, and 94 from Winnebago County. Figure 3 depicts the distribution of samples in those counties. Twenty-seven samples were collected from an area in southern Winnebago County not considered part of the primary area of concern for CWD, so these samples will be excluded from analyses pertaining to CWD prevalence, etc.
 
None of the 27 samples from southern Winnebago County tested positive for CWD. In addition, none of the 29 samples from McHenry County were positive. In the Boone-Winnebago sampling unit, 4 of 78 adult deer (5.1%) and 1 of 51 fawns (2.0%) were CWD-positive. All positive animals except one originated from sections already known to contain CWD-infected deer, with the new section being located just east of Roscoe in Winnebago County. Table 1 presents a summary of surveillance information found during this follow-up period.
 
Page 3 of 6
 
Figure 4. Firearm deer season samples included in CWD analyses.
 
Table 1. CWD Follow-up Surveillance Summary
 
Sampling Unit Age Number of Samples Number of Positives Percent Positive Boone-Winnebago Unit Fawn 51 1 2.0% Adult 78 4 5.1% Total 129 5 3.9% McHenry Unit Fawn 12 0 0.0% Adult 17 0 0.0% Total 29 0 0.0% Both Units Combined Fawn 63 1 1.6% Adult 95 4 4.2% Total 158 5 3.2%
 
Results of All Random Surveillance Data Combined
 
We combined the sample/test data from the follow-up surveillance (sharpshooting) with information gathered during the 2002 firearm deer season. In order to do this, we limited firearm deer season data to those samples taken from sections within 2 miles of a known positive section. This resulted in an additional 56 samples from an approximately 69.5 mi2 area of Boone-Winnebago counties, and 12 samples from a 38 mi2 portion of McHenry County (Figure 4). All of the samples from the firearm deer season were from adult deer, as no fawns were sampled during that season. Results of the combined surveillance testing are presented in Table 2.
 
Page 4 of 6
 
Table 2. Summary of all random surveillance data (from firearm deer season and follow-up sampling) for Illinois’ known CWD-affected areas.
 
Sampling Unit Age Number of Samples Number of Positives Percent Positive Boone-Winnebago Unit Fawn 51 1 2.0% Adult 134 8 6.0% Total 185 9 4.9% McHenry Unit Fawn 12 0 0.0% Adult 29 2 6.9% Total 41 2 4.9% Both Units Combined Fawn 63 1 1.6% Adult 163 10 6.1% Total 226 11 4.9%
 
Suspect Animal Surveillance Testing
 
Deer with clinical signs of illness continue to be submitted for CWD testing by IDNR field staff. To date, four such deer have been diagnosed as having CWD. All four originated from the Boone- Winnebago unit.
 
Surveillance Using Deer Population Control Permits
 
Four Illinois counties (Cook, DuPage, Kane, and Lake) in northeastern Illinois are closed to firearm deer hunting, thus precluding the collection of CWD samples by the same methods as in other counties. In addition, collection of samples from hunter-harvested deer in other counties is unlikely to provide significant representation of deer residing in urban/suburban areas. In an effort to collect samples from such locations, we requested that land-managing agencies controlling urban/suburban deer herds through the use of a Deer Population Control Permit (DPCP) collect samples for CWD testing. Participating permittees were provided supplies and training, as well as assistance in getting samples to the laboratory.
 
Approximately 317 samples were collected and tested through the DPCP program, primarily in northeastern Illinois. Preliminary data indicate that DPCP samples were taken in Cook (30), DuPage (159), Lake (68), Winnebago (9), and JoDaviess (51). An additional 5 samples were taken in Lake County in conjunction with an ongoing research project in Highland Park. None of the samples from any source were found to be positive for CWD.
 
Page 5 of 6
 
Figure 5. Illinois sections in which CWD-positive deer have been found (by all surveillance methods) and the number of infected animals identified in each as of 1 October 2003.
 
Discussion
 
Minimum deer densities in the areas of concern were determined by helicopter surveys flown on 5 March 2003 over snow cover. Minimum Boone-Winnebago densities were slightly more than 20 deer per square mile over approximately 48 mi2 surveyed, while McHenry County densities were lower (<15 12="" 2.8="" 2="" 3.1.="" 3.7="" 3="" 4.0="" 4.9="" 5="" 6.0="" 6.1="" 6.6="" 6.9="" 6="" 7="" 9.2="" 95="" a="" accurate="" across="" adult="" adults="" age="" all="" alone="" an="" and="" animals="" appear="" appears="" apply="" are="" area.="" area="" areas="" as="" assessment="" be="" been="" boone-winnebago="" boone="" both="" buffer="" but="" calculations="" came="" can="" caution="" classes="" combined="" concentrated="" confidence="" considerable="" contains="" counties="" county="" cwd-positive="" cwd="" date="" deer="" densities="" disease="" distributed="" distribution="" div="" does="" either="" estimate="" estimated="" estimates="" exist="" expressed="" fifteen="" for="" found="" from="" habitat="" have="" high="" hunting="" identified="" igure="" in="" included="" including="" interpreting="" intervals="" is="" known="" land="" landscape="" large="" mchenry.="" mchenry="" mi2="" miles="" most="" must="" not="" number="" occurred="" of="" only="" or="" particularly="" positives="" preclude="" presence="" preserves="" pressure="" prevalence="" primarily="" publicly-owned="" rates="" rather="" rectangle="" refuges="" relatively="" residential="" result="" results.="" sample="" samples="" similar="" sizes="" small="" so="" somewhat="" sources="" still="" sufficiently="" suitable="" than="" that="" the="" these="" to="" total="" two="" unit.="" unit="" units="" used="" variation="" was="" which="" wide="" widely="" winnebago="" wintering="" with="" would="" x="" yet="" zone.="">
 
Page 6 of 6
 
Appendix A. Summary of CWD-positive deer collected through 1 October 2003.
 
Date Collected County Map Coordinates Sex Age Surveillance Method 10/23/2002 Boone 46N 3E S31 Female Adult Suspect 11/23/2002 McHenry 44N 7E S26 Male 1.5 Hunter 12/05/2002 McHenry 44N 7E S13 Male 1.5 Hunter 12/06/2002 Boone 45N 3E S6 Male 2.5 Hunter 12/06/2002 Winnebago 45N 2E S12 Female 1.5 Hunter 12/07/2002 Boone 45N 3E S4 Male 1.5 Hunter 12/08/2002 Boone 46N 3E S7 Female 2.5 Hunter 02/08/2003 Boone 46N 3E S31 Female 4.5 Suspect 02/10/2003 Boone 46N 3E S31 Female 2.5 Follow-up 03/12/2003 Boone 45N 3E S6 Female 2.5 Follow-up 03/18/2003 Boone 45N 3E S6 Female 2.5 Follow-up 03/24/2003 Boone 46N 3E S31 Male Fawn Follow-up 03/31/2003 Winnebago 46N 2E S26 Female 5.5+ Follow-up 04/02/2003 Winnebago 46N 2E S27 Female 5.5+ Suspect 09/16/2003 Winnebago 45N 2E S2 Female 4.5+ Suspect
 
 
Search CWD test results
 
 
TSS
 
 
From: TSS (216-119-162-48.ipset44.wt.net)
 
Subject: CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE, CERVIDS - USA (ILLINOIS, WISCONSIN)
 
Date: May 10, 2003 at 7:08 pm PST
 
CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE, CERVIDS - USA (ILLINOIS, WISCONSIN)
 
**************************************************
 
A ProMED-mail post
 
ProMED-mail, a program of the International Society for Infectious Diseases
 
[1] Date: 1 May 2003 From: A-Lan Banks Source: Week-TV, Illinois [edited]
 
Illinois officials say Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in the state appears to be confined to small areas of Boone, Winnebago, and McHenry counties.
 
The Illinois department of Natural Resources (DNR) says 185 tissue samples collected in February 2003 turned up 7 new cases. Forest Program Manager Paul Shelton says the results are encouraging signs that the state can control the neurological disease that kills deer.
 
Shelton says fairly intensive testing has not turned up any cases in central and southern Illinois.
 
-- ProMED-mail
 
****** [2] Date: 29 Apr 2003 From: A-Lan Banks Source: Newsday [edited]
 
Another 49 deer with chronic wasting disease have been found in Wisconsin, all within the area where the brain disease was discovered a year ago, reported the state Department of Natural Resources (DNR).
 
The new cases bring the total number of diseased deer found in the Mount Horeb area to 190, about 2 percent of the deer that were examined, the agency said. All but 2 of the diseased deer were killed in Dane and Iowa counties.
 
The disease that threatens the state's $1 billion hunting industry had never been found east of the Mississippi River until it was detected 13 months ago near Mount Horeb in southwestern Wisconsin.
 
Scientists have tested the brains of 39 012 of the 40 111 hunter-killed deer statewide and donated for analysis for chronic wasting disease, in an unprecedented attempt to determine how far the disease had spread into a whitetail herd estimated at 1.6 million deer, according to the DNR.
 
The ailment creates sponge-like holes in a deer's brain, causing the animal to become thin, act abnormally, and die. Scientists believe it is spread by animal-to-animal contact. There is no scientific evidence it can infect humans, but people are advised not to eat an infected deer.
 
Of the diseased deer found so far, 99 were in Iowa County, 89 were in Dane County, one in Richland County, and one in Sauk County. Only 6 deer with the disease have been found outside the 411-square-mile eradication zone around Mount Horeb where the DNR wants all the deer killed to try to wipe out the disease from the herd. Those 6 were found in the so-called management zone nearby and suggest that the rate of the infection in that area is 0.10 percent, the DNR said.
 
Wildlife officials will make no decision on whether to expand the eradication zone to include land near those deer until the state Natural Resources Board acts on some proposed permanent regulations concerning the disease, DNR spokesman Bob Manwell said.
 
The Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Madison had reported it had analyzed all deer samples for the disease. Manwell said getting the final test results may take another week or 2. The results so far are positive because the disease seems clustered in a fairly small area, Manwell said.
 
"We have not found those outliers way out that everybody was kind of fearful of," he said. "Some of our fears are beginning to lessen a little bit." The DNR still does not know how the disease got into the herd, Manwell said.
 
"We are not anywhere near saying we got this thing in hand or under control," he said. "Granted, it is a relatively low prevalence in the overall population. We are going to be watching it carefully over the years to come."
 
[Byline: Robert Imrie]
 
-- ProMED-mail
 
[Although the Wisconsin DNR is to be commended for its desire to eradicate the disease, it seems inappropriate to attempt to eradicate all the animals within a certain designated area. The animals are known to travel some distances and to jump fences and would not recognize a man-made designated area. A survey might seem appropriate, but the eradication attempt does not seem well thought-out, especially in view of the low percentage of positives. - Mod.TG]
 
[see also:
 
snip...end...tss
 
 
 
From: TSS (216-119-163-132.ipset45.wt.net)
 
Subject: GOD HELP THE NEEDY! (potentially sub-clinical MAD deer/elk to be donated to food pantry's) ILLINOIS
 
Date: February 6, 2003 at 7:52 am PST
 
Illinois Department of Natural Resources
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE February 5, 2003
 
DNR TO DO ADDITIONAL CWD TESTING
 
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. – The Department of Natural Resources is undertaking additional testing of white-tailed deer in Boone, McHenry and Winnebago counties for chronic wasting disease, where seven confirmed cases of CWD have occurred.
 
IDNR will be taking samples at Rock Cut State Park in Winnebago County, owned by the Department; Kinnikinnick Conservation Area owned by the Boone County Conservation District; and select properties owned by private individuals. The deer removal is being conducted by teams comprised of USDA Wildlife Services staff and IDNR biologists. Properties that have been selected are located in the areas in which CWD-positive deer have been found, and contain significant blocks of deer habitat where the animals tend to concentrate during winter.
 
Chronic wasting disease is a fatal neurological disease found in deer and elk. The disease affects the brains of infected animals, causing them to become emaciated, display abnormal behavior, lose coordination and eventually die. It is not known to be contagious to livestock or humans.
 
So far, about 3,500 tests for CWD have been completed on the 4,100 samples taken from hunter-harvested deer. A total of seven deer have tested positive, including six taken during the firearm deer season in November and December. All of the positive cases have been in Boone, McHenry and Winnebago counties.
 
"This additional testing, concentrating on known CWD areas, will allow us to better assess the status of CWD in northern Illinois," said Paul Shelton, IDNR's Forest Wildlife Program Manager. Shelton noted that biologists have been unable to conduct aerial deer population surveys due to a lack of snow cover in the vicinity of known CWD-positive animals, but they intend to conduct the surveys as soon as weather conditions allow.
 
Additional samples will help biologists determine how long CWD may have been present and the distribution and prevalence of the disease. Sampling is expected to be completed by the end of February or early March, with results several weeks later. The test results will help the Department further refine its strategy for dealing with the disease. The deer carcasses will be held in an approved facility until CWD test results are available. Deer that test negative will be processed and donated to food pantries.
 
For updated information about chronic wasting disease, including answers to frequently asked questions and the Department's rules, please see our web site at: http://dnr.state.il.us/pubaffairs/2002/CWD.htm . A web application that allows participating hunters to check the status of test results for deer sampled during the firearm deer season is available at that site.
 
 
 
very important to those hunters looking for healthy deer/elk to eat...TSS
 
 MRC-43-00
 
Issued: Monday, 28 August 2000
 
NEW EVIDENCE OF SUB-CLINICAL PRION INFECTION: IMPORTANT RESEARCH FINDINGS RELEVANT TO CJD AND BSE
 
A team of researchers led by Professor John Collinge at the Medical Research Council Prion Unit1 report today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, on new evidence for the existence of a 'sub-clinical' form of BSE in mice which was unknown until now.
 
The scientists took a closer look at what is known as the 'species barrier' - the main protective factor which limits the ability of prions2 to jump from one species to infect another. They found the mice had a 'sub-clinical' form of disease where they carried high levels of infectivity but did not develop the clinical disease during their normal lifespan. The idea that individuals can carry a disease and show no clinical symptoms is not new. It is commonly seen in conventional infectious diseases.
 
Researchers tried to infect laboratory mice with hamster prions3 called Sc237 and found that the mice showed no apparent signs of disease. However, on closer inspection they found that the mice had high levels of mouse prions in their brains. This was surprising because it has always been assumed that hamster prions could not cause the disease in mice, even when injected directly into the brain.
 
In addition the researchers showed that this new sub-clinical infection could be easily passed on when injected into healthy mice and hamsters.
 
The height of the species barrier varies widely between different combinations of animals and also varies with the type or strain of prions. While some barriers are quite small (for instance BSE easily infects mice), other combinations of strain and species show a seemingly impenetrable barrier. Traditionally, the particular barrier studied here was assumed to be robust.
 
Professor John Collinge said: "These results have a number of important implications. They suggest that we should re-think how we measure species barriers in the laboratory, and that we should not assume that just because one species appears resistant to a strain of prions they have been exposed to, that they do not silently carry the infection. This research raises the possibility, which has been mentioned before, that apparently healthy cattle could harbour, but never show signs of, BSE.
 
"This is a timely and unexpected result, increasing what we know about prion disease. These new findings have important implications for those researching prion disease, those responsible for preventing infected material getting into the food chain and for those considering how best to safeguard health and reduce the risk that theoretically, prion disease could be contracted through medical and surgical procedures."
 
ISSUED FRIDAY 25 AUGUST UNDER EMBARGO. PLEASE NOTE THAT THE EMBARGO IS SET BY THE JOURNAL.
 
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT THE MRC PRESS OFFICE ON 020 7637 6011 (OFFICE HOURS) OR 07818 428297 OR 0385 774357 (OUT-OF-OFFICE-HOURS) OR PROFESSOR JOHN COLLINGE ON 020 7594 3760. PLEASE NOTE THAT OWING TO TRAVEL COMMITMENTS PROFESSOR COLLINGE WILL ONLY BE AVAILABLE UNTIL 16.30 ON FRIDAY 25 AUGUST AND CONTACTABLE AGAIN ON MONDAY 28 AUGUST VIA THE MRC PRESS OFFICE. DR ANDREW HILL (A CO-AUTHOR ON THE PAPER) FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE WILL BE AVAILABLE ON 00 61 3 8344 3995 (DURING OFFICE HOURS) OR 00 61 3 9443 0009 (OUT-OF-OFFICE HOURS). PLEASE NOTE THAT AUSTRALIA IS TEN HOURS AHEAD OF UK TIME.
 
NOTES FOR EDITORS
 
Professor Collinge is a consultant neurologist and Director of the newly formed MRC Prion Unit based at The Imperial College School of Medicine at St Mary's Hospital. He is also a member of the UK Government's Spongiform Encephalopathy Advisory Committee (SEAC). The MRC prion unit is was set up in 1999, and its work includes molecular genetic studies of human prion disease and transgenic modelling of human prion diseases.
 
Prions are unique infectious agents that cause fatal brain diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans and scrapie and BSE (mad cow disease) in animals. In some circumstances prions from one species of animals can infect another and it is clear that BSE has done this to cause the disease variant CJD in the UK and France. It remains unclear how large an epidemic of variant CJD will occur over the years ahead.
 
The strain of prion used here to infect the mice is the Sc237 strain (also known as 263K) which infects hamsters, and until now was assumed not to infect mice.
 
This research was funded by the Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust.
 
The Medical Research Council (MRC) is a national organisation funded by the UK tax-payer. Its business is medical research aimed at improving human health; everyone stands to benefit from the outputs. The research it supports and the scientists it trains meet the needs of the health services, the pharmaceutical and other health-related industries and the academic world. MRC has funded work which has led to some of the most significant discoveries and achievements in medicine in the UK. About half of the MRC's expenditure of £345 million is invested in over 50 of its Institutes and Units, where it employs its own research staff. The remaining half goes in the form of grant support and training awards to individuals and teams in universities and medical schools.
 
The Wellcome Trust is the world's largest medical research charity with a spend of some £600 million in the current financial year 1999/2000. The Wellcome Trust supports more than 5,000 researchers, at 400 locations, in 42 different countries to promote and foster research with the aim of improving human and animal health. As well as funding major initiatives in the public understanding of science, the Wellcome Trust is the country's leading supporter of research into the history of medicine.
 
©2002 Medical Research Council Data Protection policy | Contact the MRC
 
TSS
 
 From: TSS (216-119-163-98.ipset45.wt.net)
 
Subject: CWD--ILLINOIS--THREE MORE POSITIVE CWD CASES FOUND !!!
 
Date: December 16, 2002 at 12:44 pm PST
 
Illinois Department of Natural Resources
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE December 16, 2002
 
THREE MORE POSITIVE CWD CASES FOUND IN ILLINOIS
 
SPRINGFIELD, ILL. – Chronic wasting disease (CWD) has been detected in three more deer in northern Illinois, the Department of Natural Resources announced today, bringing to four the number of confirmed cases of the disease in Illinois. CWD is not known to be contagious to livestock or humans.
 
Two of the three new cases were found in the vicinity of the first CWD case reported in early November. One positive case each was returned from Boone, McHenry and Winnebago counties. This represents the second instance of a CWD-positive deer in Boone County. (Illinois'first case, originally reported as from Winnebago County, actually was just over the county line in Boone County). The locations of the three cases reported to date within Boone and Winnebago counties are within approximately two miles of each other in an area east of Roscoe, Illinois. The McHenry County positive deer came from an area a few miles northeast of Woodstock. The new cases include a 2.5-year-old buck (Boone), 1.5 year-old-buck (McHenry) and a 1.5-year-old doe (Winnebago).
 
The samples were taken as part of IDNR's CWD surveillance of deer harvested during the firearm deer season. Testing was conducted at the Illinois Department of Agriculture Disease Laboratories. A follow-up test on the McHenry County case was conducted at the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, confirming the diagnosis. Follow-up tests on the Boone and Winnebago county animals were deemed unnecessary, given their location and the contagious nature of the disease.
 
"It comes as no surprise that we found additional cases near the first one," said IDNR Director Brent Manning. "The identification of a new location in McHenry County, although an unwelcome result, does demonstrate that our surveillance program is proving effective. We will continue to study results as they come in, in order to incorporate the best science into our response strategies."
 
Illinois expanded its surveillance efforts regarding CWD earlier this year and created a joint task force with the Departments of Natural Resources and Agriculture following the CWD outbreak in southern Wisconsin. About 4,000 samples of hunter-harvested deer were taken in 36 counties around Illinois during the firearm deer season Nov. 22-24 and Dec.5-8. Tests have been completed on about 1,450 samples, with only the three positive results.
 
"We continue to be committed to a long-term plan of stepped up surveillance and monitoring and taking all steps biologically appropriate to combat chronic wasting disease in Illinois. Deer hunters and those who value the health of wildlife and outdoor recreation in Illinois played an important role during the firearm season and will continue to play an important role in that process."
 
Counties sampled for CWD during the 2002 firearm deer hunting season included: Jo Daviess, Stephenson, Winnebago, Boone, McHenry, Carroll, Ogle, DeKalb, Whiteside, Rock Island, Bureau, LaSalle, Hancock, Adams, Pike, Fulton, McLean, Vermilion, Sangamon, Macoupin, Shelby, Fayette, Effingham, Clark, Lawrence, Madison, St. Clair, Clinton, Washington, Randolph, Jefferson, Marion, Williamson, Union, Johnson and Pope. Counties were selected based on a variety of factors including geographic location, size of deer population and the number of facilities with captive deer or elk.
 
Chronic wasting disease is a fatal neurological disease found in deer and elk. The disease affects the brains of infected animals, causing them to become emaciated, display abnormal behavior, lose coordination and eventually die. It is not known to be contagious to livestock or humans.
 
CWD has been diagnosed in wild, free-ranging deer and elk as well as in captive animals in a number of western states but earlier this year was found in neighboring Wisconsin and Minnesota.
 
For updated information about chronic wasting disease, including answers to frequently asked questions and the Department’s rules, please see our web site at: http://dnr.state.il.us/pubaffairs/2002/CWD.htm . A web application that allows participating hunters to check the status of test results for deer sampled during the firearm deer season should be available this week.
 
###
 
 
TSS
 
 
From: TSS (216-119-162-20.ipset44.wt.net)
 
Subject: CWD FOUND IN ILLINOIS, FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE !!!
 
Date: November 2, 2002 at 8:06 am PST
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE November 1, 2002
 
POSITIVE CWD CASE FOUND IN ILLINOIS
 
SPRINGFIELD, ILL. ? Chronic wasting disease (CWD) has been detected in a sample from a wild deer near Roscoe in Winnebago County, the Department of Natural Resources announced today. CWD is not known to be contagious to livestock or humans.
 
The young female deer was shot by a landowner in late October because he believed it was ill. DNR Conservation Police officers were contacted and collected the doe for testing at the Illinois Department of Agriculture laboratory in Centralia. A follow-up test conducted today at the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, confirmed the diagnosis.
 
"This is the first positive for CWD from any deer or elk in Illinois, though we've been monitoring and testing for the disease for the past five years," said IDNR Director Brent Manning. "Illinois expanded its surveillance efforts earlier this year and created a joint task force with the Departments of Natural Resources and Agriculture following the CWD outbreak in southern Wisconsin."
 
"The detection of CWD in Winnebago County is disappointing," Manning said. "We are committed to a long-term plan of stepped up surveillance and monitoring and to taking all steps biologically appropriate to control the spread of chronic wasting disease in Illinois. Deer hunters and those who value the health of wildlife and outdoor recreation in Illinois will continue to play an important role in that process."
 
Extensive testing for the disease is planned during Illinois' firearm deer season, which begins Friday, Nov. 22. About 3,500 samples in 36 counties from hunter- harvested deer around Illinois will be collected and tested. Larger numbers of samples from hunter-harvested deer are being collected in northern Illinois. Additional samples also are being taken from deer control programs in northeastern Illinois where firearm deer hunting is not allowed.
 
Counties tentatively to be sampled for CWD during the 2002 firearm deer hunting season include Jo Daviess, Stephenson, Winnebago, Boone, McHenry, Carroll, Ogle, DeKalb, Whiteside, Rock Island, Bureau, LaSalle, Hancock, Adams, Pike, Fulton, McLean, Vermilion, Sangamon, Macoupin, Shelby, Fayette, Effingham, Clark, Lawrence, Madison, St. Clair, Clinton, Washington, Randolph, Jefferson, Marion,Williamson, Union, Johnson and Pope. Counties were selected based on a variety of factors including geographic location, size of deer population and the number of facilities with captive deer or elk.
 
"Once we get test results back from our expanded surveillance efforts the task force will be able to evaluate the extent of the disease in Illinois and the necessary steps to control the disease," Manning said.
 
Chronic wasting disease is a fatal neurological disease found in deer and elk. The disease affects the brains of infected animals, causing them to become emaciated, display abnormal behavior, lose coordination and eventually die. It is not known to be contagious to livestock or humans.
 
CWD has been diagnosed in wild, free-ranging deer and elk as well as in captive animals in a number of western states but earlier this year was found in neighboring Wisconsin and Minnesota. Illinois has been testing suspect animals for the last five years, as well as taking samples during deer hunting season.
 
A task force, comprised of key staff from both agencies, has been working for months to develop plans to address surveillance of wild deer and captive herds, import and export of deer and elk and a planned response to a potential chronic wasting disease outbreak in Illinois.
 
The importation of hunter-harvested deer and elk is being limited, the importation of live animals has been restricted and the feeding of wild deer has been banned.
 
A DNR rule bans the importation of hunter-harvested deer and elk carcases into Illinois, except for deboned meat, antlers, antlers attached to skull caps, hides, upper canine teeth, and finished taxidermist mounts. Skull caps must be cleaned of all brain and muscle tissue. This action prevents hunters from bringing potentially diseased animals into Illinois and discarding their parts in a manner that could result in contamination of Illinois' deer herd.
 
The Department has banned the feeding of wild deer and other wildlife in areas where wild deer are present. The ban includes food, salt, mineral blocks and other food products, with some exceptions. For example, bird and squirrel feeders close to homes and incidental feeding of wildlife within active livestock operations, are exempt from the ban. For a complete list of the exemptions see the rule on the Department's web site.
 
The Department has also implemented regulations to minimize the threat of chronic wasting disease entering Illinois through the interstate transportation of captive deer and elk and to monitor captive herds already in Illinois. DNR shares responsibility with the Department of Agriculture in regulating captive deer and elk on game farms. DNR's new rule complements new regulations being adopted by the Agriculture Department for diseased animals.
 
For updated information about chronic wasting disease, including answers to frequently asked questions and the Department's rules, please see our web site at: http://dnr.state.il.us/pubaffairs/2002/CWD.htm .
 
 
TSS
 
 
From: TSS (216-119-162-10.ipset44.wt.net)
 
Subject: Re: CWD FOUND IN ILLINOIS, FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE !!!
 
Date: November 2, 2002 at 7:56 pm PST
 
In Reply to: CWD FOUND IN ILLINOIS, FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE !!! posted by TSS on November 2, 2002 at 8:06 am:
 
"This is the first positive for CWD from any deer or elk in Illinois,
 
>though we've been monitoring and testing for the disease for the past
 
>five years," said IDNR Director Brent Manning.
 
***oh really brent? tell us how many deer you have wild and game farm deer and elk you have tested in these 5 years. it seems you permitted all kinds of cr@p even after the Wisconsin thing blew up: "The Illinois DNR is also restricting importing live deer and elk to game farms for another 150 days and has banned the feeding of wild deer and other wildlife where wild deer are present" ie it used to be ok to import and feed them. July 30, 2002 emergency rule...
 
 
***your press release is totally silent about illinois game farms but it seems there might be a game farm right in the area where this one was found??
 
 
***Beans Whitetails Pearl City, IL DC Elk & Whitetail Deer Farm Elpaso, IL 4 the Sport Nebo, IL Higgins Trophy Whitetails Gays, IL Hunziker's Whitetail Deer Eureka, IL Meadow Creek Whitetail & Elk Effingham, IL Mill Creek Farms Quincy, IL Pruchniaks Deer Farm Wauconda, IL Williams Whitetail Deer Farm Stewardson, IL
 
TSS
 
 
From: TSS (216-119-162-10.ipset44.wt.net)
 
Subject: Wasting disease found in northern Illinois deer
 
Date: November 2, 2002 at 7:58 pm PST
 
In Reply to: Re: CWD FOUND IN ILLINOIS, FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE !!! posted by TSS on November 2, 2002 at 7:56 pm:
 
Wasting disease found in northern Illinois deer
 
A variant of mad-cow, the illness is fatal to cervids
 
November 2, 2002
 
By JEFF LAMPE of the Journal Star
 
PEORIA - The news Illinois deer hunters and wildlife officials have been dreading all fall became official Friday when a Winnebago County white-tailed deer tested positive for chronic wasting disease.
 
The young female deer shot by a landowner northeast of Rockford is the first Illinois animal to test positive for chronic wasting disease - a fatal neurological malady first found in Colorado elk in the 1960s.
 
Though the result was not unexpected, given a similar discovery last February in southern Wisconsin, Friday's news was not welcomed by wildlife officials.
 
"The detection of CWD in Winnebago County is disappointing," said Brent Manning, director of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. "We are committed to a long-term plan of stepped-up surveillance and monitoring to control the spread of this disease."
 
CWD is a variant of mad-cow disease caused by an abnormally shaped protein that damages brain and nerve tissue. So far there is no scientific evidence indicating CWD is transmissible to humans.
 
"The first thing I would say is I personally eat venison," Manning said. "Secondly, there have been no confirmed cases of this disease being passed into the human population."
 
Similar sentiments have not eased the fears of some residents of Wisconsin. The disease was first found in that state near Mount Horeb, 40 miles north of the Illinois border.
 
Sales of hunting licenses are down 23 percent in the months since and revenues for the Wisconsin DNR have dropped by $3.8 million. And many Wisconsin citizens expressed outrage at that state's plan to kill every deer in a 361-square-mile area around Mount Horeb.
 
Illinois officials said Friday they have no plans to initiate a similar eradication plan in Winnebago County. Officials also stressed that Illinois' 230,000 deer hunters need not panic.
 
"One deer doesn't mean an epidemic. So we're taking this one step at a time," said John Buhnerkempe, head of the DNR's wildlife division. "I feel strongly the best approach is to take a very deliberate approach and not do anything extraordinary at this point and time."
 
To gauge the scope of the disease, the DNR plans to sample at least 3,500 deer during the shotgun hunting season.
 
Hunters are also asked to report any animals they see showing signs of emaciation, staggering, consuming large amounts of water, urinating excessively or generally showing a lack of wariness.
 
"After we gather data and apply the best science we have to that information we'll figure out how to deal with this disease and how to manage it for the state," Buhnerkempe said.
 
Beyond that, officials urge hunters to follow basic precautions when handling deer they shoot.
 
Preliminary indications from some hunters in Winnebago County is that they still plan to head afield. Archery season has been under way in Illinois since Oct. 1 and the first shotgun season runs Nov. 22-24.
 
"We were all pretty much hoping it wasn't here," said Robert Erb of Rockford, a long-time bowhunter. "But I don't think people are going to quit hunting. Unless it starts showing up more."
 
That possibility certainly exists.
 
Test results are still pending for an animal shot this week by conservation police officer Steve Vasicek near Tremont.
 
"It was emaciated and sick looking and would let me walk to within 10 yards of it before it would startle and run," Vasicek said.
 
That description is similar to the one called in Oct. 25 by the Winnebago County landowner who lived near the city of Roscoe.
 
"The farmer said the deer was sick and looked emaciated and let him walk right to it before he shot it," said Lt. William Shannon, a conservation police officer.
 
Tests conducted at both the Illinois Department of Agriculture laboratory in Centralia and the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, confirmed the disease.
 
As a result, Illinois joins the ranks of 10 other states and two Canadian provinces that have discovered CWD in deer or elk within their borders.
 
 
TSS
 
snip...see full text and more ;
 
 
Thursday, September 19, 2013
 
Illinois Chronic Wasting Disease: 2012-2013 Surveillance and Management Report
 
 
 
Tuesday, February 04, 2014
 
Indiana Hunting preserves Sen. Carlin Yoder Senate Bill 404 and Rep. William Friend House Bill 1154 DEAD IN THE WATER ?
 
 
 
 
pens, pens, PENS ??
 
*** Spraker suggested an interesting explanation for the occurrence of CWD. The deer pens at the Foot Hills Campus were built some 30-40 years ago by a Dr. Bob Davis. At or abut that time, allegedly, some scrapie work was conducted at this site. When deer were introduced to the pens they occupied ground that had previously been occupied by sheep. ...
 
also, see where even decades back, the USDA had the same thought as they do today with CWD, not their problem...see page 27 below as well, where USDA stated back then, the same thing they stated in the state of Pennsylvania, not their damn business, once they escape, and they said the same thing about CWD in general back then ;
 
”The occurrence of CWD must be viewed against the contest of the locations in which it occurred. It was an incidental and unwelcome complication of the respective wildlife research programmes. Despite it’s subsequent recognition as a new disease of cervids, therefore justifying direct investigation, no specific research funding was forthcoming. The USDA veiwed it as a wildlife problem and consequently not their province!” ...page 26.
 
 
 
”The occurrence of CWD must be viewed against the contest of the locations in which it occurred. It was an incidental and unwelcome complication of the respective wildlife research programmes. Despite it’s subsequent recognition as a new disease of cervids, therefore justifying direct investigation, no specific research funding was forthcoming. The USDA veiwed it as a wildlife problem and consequently not their province!” ...page 26.
 
sound familiar $$$
 
 
Sunday, January 06, 2013
 
USDA TO PGC ONCE CAPTIVES ESCAPE
 
*** "it‘s no longer its business.”
 
 
 
March 2012
 
Surveillance for CWD in free-ranging populations has documented a continual geographic spread of the disease throughout North America.
 
In most locations reporting CWD cases in free-ranging animals, the disease continues to emerge in wider geographic areas, and prevalence appears to be increasing in many disease-endemic areas. Areas of Wyoming now have an apparent CWD prevalence of near 50% in mule deer, and prevalence in areas of Colorado and Wisconsin is <15 0="" 10="" 5="" according="" agencies.="" and="" areas="" between="" but="" data="" deer.="" deer="" div="" elk="" from="" however="" in="" is="" lower="" many="" obtained="" of="" parts="" prevalence="" provincial="" reaches="" remains="" reports="" state="" than="" to="" wildlife="" wyoming.="">
 
Long-term effects of CWD on cervid populations and ecosystems remain unclear as the disease continues to spread and prevalence increases. In captive herds, CWD might persist at high levels and lead to complete herd destruction in the absence of human culling. Epidemiologic modeling suggests the disease could have severe effects on free-ranging deer populations, depending on hunting policies and environmental persistence (8,9). CWD has been associated with large decreases in free-ranging mule deer populations in an area of high CWD prevalence (Boulder, Colorado, USA) (5).
 
Intraspecies and interspecies passage of the CWD agent may also increase the risk for zoonotic CWD transmission. The CWD prion agent is undergoing serial passage naturally as the disease continues to emerge. In vitro and in vivo intraspecies transmission of the CWD agent yields PrPSc with an increased capacity to convert human PrPc to PrPSc (30). Interspecies prion transmission can alter CWD host range (38) and yield multiple novel prion strains (3,28). The potential for interspecies CWD transmission (by cohabitating mammals) will only increase as the disease spreads and CWD prions continue to be shed into the environment. This environmental passage itself may alter CWD prions or exert selective pressures on CWD strain mixtures by interactions with soil, which are known to vary with prion strain (25), or exposure to environmental or gut degradation.
 
Given that prion disease in humans can be difficult to diagnose and the asymptomatic incubation period can last decades, continued research, epidemiologic surveillance, and caution in handling risky material remain prudent as CWD continues to spread and the opportunity for interspecies transmission increases. Otherwise, similar to what occurred in the United Kingdom after detection of variant CJD and its subsequent link to BSE, years of prevention could be lost if zoonotic transmission of CWD is subsequently identified,
 
 
 
 
 
> > > The CWD infection rate was nearly 80%, the highest ever in a North American captive herd. <<<
 
 
From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr. Sent: Tuesday, December 20, 2011 10:18 PM To: BSE-L@LISTS.AEGEE.ORG Subject: [BSE-L] CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD WISCONSIN Almond Deer (Buckhorn Flats) Farm Update DECEMBER 2011
 
CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD WISCONSIN Almond Deer (Buckhorn Flats) Farm Update DECEMBER 2011
 
 
 
SNIP...SEE FULL TEXT ;
 
 
 
2014 CWD UPDATE
 
 *** PRICE OF CWD TSE PRION POKER GOES UP 2014 ***
 
Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy TSE PRION update January 2, 2014
 
*** chronic wasting disease, there was no absolute barrier to conversion of the human prion protein.
 
*** Furthermore, the form of human PrPres produced in this in vitro assay when seeded with CWD, resembles that found in the most common human prion disease, namely sCJD of the MM1 subtype.
 
Wednesday, January 01, 2014
 
Molecular Barriers to Zoonotic Transmission of Prions
 
*** chronic wasting disease, there was no absolute barrier to conversion of the human prion protein.
 
*** Furthermore, the form of human PrPres produced in this in vitro assay when seeded with CWD, resembles that found in the most common human prion disease, namely sCJD of the MM1 subtype.
 
 
 
 
*** The potential impact of prion diseases on human health was greatly magnified by the recognition that interspecies transfer of BSE to humans by beef ingestion resulted in vCJD. While changes in animal feed constituents and slaughter practices appear to have curtailed vCJD, there is concern that CWD of free-ranging deer and elk in the U.S. might also cross the species barrier. Thus, consuming venison could be a source of human prion disease. Whether BSE and CWD represent interspecies scrapie transfer or are newly arisen prion diseases is unknown. Therefore, the possibility of transmission of prion disease through other food animals cannot be ruled out. There is evidence that vCJD can be transmitted through blood transfusion. There is likely a pool of unknown size of asymptomatic individuals infected with vCJD, and there may be asymptomatic individuals infected with the CWD equivalent. These circumstances represent a potential threat to blood, blood products, and plasma supplies.
 
 
 
Thursday, January 2, 2014
 
*** CWD TSE Prion in cervids to hTGmice, Heidenhain Variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob Disease MM1 genotype, and iatrogenic CJD ?? ***
 
SNIP...
 
Subtype 1: (sCJDMM1 and sCJDMV1)
 
This subtype is observed in patients who are MM homozygous or MV heterozygous at codon 129 of the PrP gene (PRNP) and carry PrPSc Type 1. Clinical duration is short, 3‑4 months.32 The most common presentation in sCJDMM1 patients is cognitive impairment leading to frank dementia, gait or limb ataxia, myoclonic jerks and visual signs leading to cortical blindness (Heidenhain’s syndrome)...
 
 
 
Animals injected with iatrogenic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease MM1 and genetic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease MM1 linked to the E200K mutation showed the same phenotypic features as those infected with sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease MM1 prions...
 
 
 
*** our results raise the possibility that CJD cases classified as VV1 may include cases caused by iatrogenic transmission of sCJD-MM1 prions or food-borne infection by type 1 prions from animals, e.g., chronic wasting disease prions in cervid. In fact, two CJD-VV1 patients who hunted deer or consumed venison have been reported (40, 41). The results of the present study emphasize the need for traceback studies and careful re-examination of the biochemical properties of sCJD-VV1 prions. ***
 
 
 
 
 
SNIP...SEE FULL TEXT ;
 
 
Thursday, January 2, 2014
 
*** CWD TSE Prion in cervids to hTGmice, Heidenhain Variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob Disease MM1 genotype, and iatrogenic CJD ?? ***
 
 
 
Wednesday, January 01, 2014
 
APHIS-2006-0118-0100 Chronic Wasting Disease Herd Certification Program and Interstate Movement of Farmed or Captive Deer, Elk, and Moose
 
 
 
Friday, November 22, 2013
 
Wasting disease is threat to the entire UK deer population CWD TSE Prion disease Singeltary submission to Scottish Parliament
 
 
 
Monday, February 3, 2014
 
Evaluation of the zoonotic potential of transmissible mink encephalopathy TSE Prion disease
 
Research Project: TRANSMISSION, DIFFERENTIATION, AND PATHOBIOLOGY OF TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES
 
 
 
Sunday, December 15, 2013
 
FDA PART 589 -- SUBSTANCES PROHIBITED FROM USE IN ANIMAL FOOD OR FEED VIOLATIONS OFFICIAL ACTION INDICATED OIA UPDATE DECEMBER 2013 UPDATE
 
 
 
Thursday, October 10, 2013
 
*** CJD REPORT 1994 increased risk for consumption of veal and venison and lamb
 
 
 
Re: vCJD in the USA * BSE in U.S. 15 November 1999 Terry S Singeltary, NA
 
CWD is just a small piece of a very big puzzle. I have seen while deer hunting, deer, squirrels and birds, eating from cattle feed troughs where they feed cattle, the high protein cattle by products, at least up until Aug. 4, 1997. So why would it be so hard to believe that this is how they might become infected with a TSE. Or, even by potentially infected land. It's been well documented that it could be possible, from scrapie.
 
It was proven in Oprah Winfrey's trial, that Cactus Cattle feeders, sent neurologically ill cattle, some with encephalopathy stamped on the dead slips, were picked up and sent to the renders, along with sheep carcasses.
 
 
 
U.S. Scientist should be concerned with a CJD epidemic in the U.S., as well...
 
2 January 2000 Terry S Singeltary
 
The exact same recipe for B.S.E. existed in the U.S. for years and years. In reading over the Qualitative Analysis of BSE Risk Factors-1, this is a 25 page report by the USDA:APHIS:VS. It could have been done in one page. The first page, fourth paragraph says it all;
 
"Similarities exist in the two countries usage of continuous rendering technology and the lack of usage of solvents, however, large differences still remain with other risk factors which greatly reduce the potential risk at the national level."
 
Then, the next 24 pages tries to down-play the high risks of B.S.E. in the U.S., with nothing more than the cattle to sheep ratio count, and the geographical locations of herds and flocks. That's all the evidence they can come up with, in the next 24 pages.
 
Something else I find odd, page 16;
 
"In the United Kingdom there is much concern for a specific continuous rendering technology which uses lower temperatures and accounts for 25 percent of total output. This technology was _originally_ designed and imported from the United States. However, the specific application in the production process is _believed_ to be different in the two countries."
 
A few more factors to consider, page 15;
 
"Figure 26 compares animal protein production for the two countries. The calculations are based on slaughter numbers, fallen stock estimates, and product yield coefficients. This approach is used due to variation of up to 80 percent from different reported sources. At 3.6 million tons, the United States produces 8 times more animal rendered product than the United Kingdom."
 
"The risk of introducing the BSE agent through sheep meat and bone meal is more acute in both relative and absolute terms in the United Kingdom (Figures 27 and 28). Note that sheep meat and bone meal accounts for 14 percent, or 61 thousand tons, in the United Kingdom versus 0.6 percent or 22 thousand tons in the United States. For sheep greater than 1 year, this is less than one-tenth of one percent of the United States supply."
 
"The potential risk of amplification of the BSE agent through cattle meat and bone meal is much greater in the United States where it accounts for 59 percent of total product or almost 5 times more than the total amount of rendered product in the United Kingdom."
 
Considering, it would only take _one_ scrapie infected sheep to contaminate the feed. Considering Scrapie has run rampant in the U.S. for years, as of Aug. 1999, 950 scrapie infected flocks. Also, Considering only one quarter spoonful of scrapie infected material is lethal to a cow. Considering all this, the sheep to cow ration is meaningless. As I said, it's 24 pages of B.S.e.
 
To be continued...
 
Terry S. Singeltary Sr. P.O. Box 42 Bacliff, Texas USA
 
Competing interests: None declared
 
 
 
Letters
 
JAMA. 2001;285(6):733-734. doi: 10.1001/jama.285.6.733
 
Diagnosis and Reporting of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease
 
Terry S. Singeltary, Sr Bacliff, Tex
 
Since this article does not have an abstract, we have provided the first 150 words of the full text.
 
KEYWORDS: creutzfeldt-jakob disease, diagnosis. To the Editor: In their Research Letter, Dr Gibbons and colleagues1 reported that the annual US death rate due to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) has been stable since 1985. These estimates, however, are based only on reported cases, and do not include misdiagnosed or preclinical cases. It seems to me that misdiagnosis alone would drastically change these figures. An unknown number of persons with a diagnosis of Alzheimer disease in fact may have CJD, although only a small number of these patients receive the postmortem examination necessary to make this diagnosis. Furthermore, only a few states have made CJD reportable. Human and animal transmissible spongiform encephalopathies should be reportable nationwide and internationally.
 
References 1. Gibbons RV, Holman RC, Belay ED, Schonberger LB. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the United States: 1979-1998. JAMA. 2000;284:2322-2323.
 
 
 
Published March 26, 2003
 
RE-Monitoring the occurrence of emerging forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the United States
 
Terry S. Singeltary, retired (medically)
 
I lost my mother to hvCJD (Heidenhain Variant CJD). I would like to comment on the CDC's attempts to monitor the occurrence of emerging forms of CJD. Asante, Collinge et al [1] have reported that BSE transmission to the 129-methionine genotype can lead to an alternate phenotype that is indistinguishable from type 2 PrPSc, the commonest sporadic CJD. However, CJD and all human TSEs are not reportable nationally. CJD and all human TSEs must be made reportable in every state and internationally. I hope that the CDC does not continue to expect us to still believe that the 85%+ of all CJD cases which are sporadic are all spontaneous, without route/source. We have many TSEs in the USA in both animal and man. CWD in deer/elk is spreading rapidly and CWD does transmit to mink, ferret, cattle, and squirrel monkey by intracerebral inoculation. With the known incubation periods in other TSEs, oral transmission studies of CWD may take much longer. Every victim/family of CJD/TSEs should be asked about route and source of this agent. To prolong this will only spread the agent and needlessly expose others. In light of the findings of Asante and Collinge et al, there should be drastic measures to safeguard the medical and surgical arena from sporadic CJDs and all human TSEs. I only ponder how many sporadic CJDs in the USA are type 2 PrPSc?
 
Published March 26, 2003
 
 
 
14th ICID International Scientific Exchange Brochure - Final Abstract Number: ISE.114
 
Session: International Scientific Exchange
 
Transmissible Spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) animal and human TSE in North America update October 2009
 
T. Singeltary Bacliff, TX, USA
 
Background: An update on atypical BSE and other TSE in North America. Please remember, the typical U.K. c-BSE, the atypical l-BSE (BASE), and h-BSE have all been documented in North America, along with the typical scrapie's, and atypical Nor-98 Scrapie, and to date, 2 different strains of CWD, and also TME. All these TSE in different species have been rendered and fed to food producing animals for humans and animals in North America (TSE in cats and dogs ?), and that the trading of these TSEs via animals and products via the USA and Canada has been immense over the years, decades.
 
Methods: 12 years independent research of available data
 
Results: I propose that the current diagnostic criteria for human TSEs only enhances and helps the spreading of human TSE from the continued belief of the UKBSEnvCJD only theory in 2009. With all the science to date refuting it, to continue to validate this old myth, will only spread this TSE agent through a multitude of potential routes and sources i.e. consumption, medical i.e., surgical, blood, dental, endoscopy, optical, nutritional supplements, cosmetics etc.
 
Conclusion: I would like to submit a review of past CJD surveillance in the USA, and the urgent need to make all human TSE in the USA a reportable disease, in every state, of every age group, and to make this mandatory immediately without further delay. The ramifications of not doing so will only allow this agent to spread further in the medical, dental, surgical arena's. Restricting the reporting of CJD and or any human TSE is NOT scientific. Iatrogenic CJD knows NO age group, TSE knows no boundaries. I propose as with Aguzzi, Asante, Collinge, Caughey, Deslys, Dormont, Gibbs, Gajdusek, Ironside, Manuelidis, Marsh, et al and many more, that the world of TSE Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy is far from an exact science, but there is enough proven science to date that this myth should be put to rest once and for all, and that we move forward with a new classification for human and animal TSE that would properly identify the infected species, the source species, and then the route.
 
 
 
The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 3, Issue 8, Page 463, August 2003 doi:10.1016/S1473-3099(03)00715-1Cite or Link Using DOI
 
Tracking spongiform encephalopathies in North America
 
Original
 
Xavier Bosch
 
“My name is Terry S Singeltary Sr, and I live in Bacliff, Texas. I lost my mom to hvCJD (Heidenhain variant CJD) and have been searching for answers ever since. What I have found is that we have not been told the truth. CWD in deer and elk is a small portion of a much bigger problem.” 49-year—old Singeltary is one of a number of people who have remained largely unsatisfied after being told that a close relative died from a rapidly progressive dementia compatible with spontaneous Creutzfeldt—Jakob ...
 
 
 
 
SEE FULL TEXT ;
 
-------- Original Message --------
 
Subject: Tracking spongiform encephalopathies in North America LANCET INFECTIOUS DISEASE Volume 3, Number 8 01 August 2003
 
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2003 17:35:30 –0500
 
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr." Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
 
To: BSE-L@uni-karlsruhe.de
 
Volume 3, Number 8 01 August 2003
 
Previous
 
Next
 
Newsdesk
 
Tracking spongiform encephalopathies in North America
 
Xavier Bosch
 
My name is Terry S Singeltary Sr, and I live in Bacliff, Texas. I lost my mom to hvCJD (Heidenhain variant CJD) and have been searching for answers ever since. What I have found is that we have not been told the truth. CWD in deer and elk is a small portion of a much bigger problem.
 
49-year-old Singeltary is one of a number of people who have remained largely unsatisfied after being told that a close relative died from a rapidly progressive dementia compatible with spontaneous Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). So he decided to gather hundreds of documents on transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) and realised that if Britons could get variant CJD from bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), Americans might get a similar disorder from chronic wasting disease (CWD)the relative of mad cow disease seen among deer and elk in the USA. Although his feverish search did not lead him to the smoking gun linking CWD to a similar disease in North American people, it did uncover a largely disappointing situation.
 
Singeltary was greatly demoralised at the few attempts to monitor the occurrence of CJD and CWD in the USA. Only a few states have made CJD reportable. Human and animal TSEs should be reportable nationwide and internationally, he complained in a letter to the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA 2003; 285: 733). I hope that the CDC does not continue to expect us to still believe that the 85% plus of all CJD cases which are sporadic are all spontaneous, without route or source.
 
Until recently, CWD was thought to be confined to the wild in a small region in Colorado. But since early 2002, it has been reported in other areas, including Wisconsin, South Dakota, and the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. Indeed, the occurrence of CWD in states that were not endemic previously increased concern about a widespread outbreak and possible transmission to people and cattle.
 
To date, experimental studies have proven that the CWD agent can be transmitted to cattle by intracerebral inoculation and that it can cross the mucous membranes of the digestive tract to initiate infection in lymphoid tissue before invasion of the central nervous system. Yet the plausibility of CWD spreading to people has remained elusive.
 
Part of the problem seems to stem from the US surveillance system. CJD is only reported in those areas known to be endemic foci of CWD. Moreover, US authorities have been criticised for not having performed enough prionic tests in farm deer and elk.
 
Although in November last year the US Food and Drug Administration issued a directive to state public-health and agriculture officials prohibiting material from CWD-positive animals from being used as an ingredient in feed for any animal species, epidemiological control and research in the USA has been quite different from the situation in the UK and Europe regarding BSE.
 
Getting data on TSEs in the USA from the government is like pulling teeth, Singeltary argues. You get it when they want you to have it, and only what they want you to have.
 
Norman Foster, director of the Cognitive Disorders Clinic at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI, USA), says that current surveillance of prion disease in people in the USA is inadequate to detect whether CWD is occurring in human beings; adding that, the cases that we know about are reassuring, because they do not suggest the appearance of a new variant of CJD in the USA or atypical features in patients that might be exposed to CWD. However, until we establish a system that identifies and analyses a high proportion of suspected prion disease cases we will not know for sure. The USA should develop a system modelled on that established in the UK, he points out.
 
Ali Samii, a neurologist at Seattle VA Medical Center who recently reported the cases of three hunterstwo of whom were friendswho died from pathologically confirmed CJD, says that at present there are insufficient data to claim transmission of CWD into humans; adding that [only] by asking [the questions of venison consumption and deer/elk hunting] in every case can we collect suspect cases and look into the plausibility of transmission further. Samii argues that by making both doctors and hunters more aware of the possibility of prions spreading through eating venison, doctors treating hunters with dementia can consider a possible prion disease, and doctors treating CJD patients will know to ask whether they ate venison.
 
CDC spokesman Ermias Belay says that the CDC will not be investigating the [Samii] cases because there is no evidence that the men ate CWD-infected meat. He notes that although the likelihood of CWD jumping the species barrier to infect humans cannot be ruled out 100% and that [we] cannot be 100% sure that CWD does not exist in humans& the data seeking evidence of CWD transmission to humans have been very limited.
 
 
 
Singeltary submission to PLOS ;
 
No competing interests declared.
 
see full text ;
 
 
 Owens, Julie
 
From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr. [flounder9@verizon.net]
 
Sent: Monday, July 24, 2006 1:09 PM
 
To: FSIS RegulationsComments
 
Subject: [Docket No. FSIS-2006-0011] FSIS Harvard Risk Assessment of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Page 1 of 98
 
 
 
FSIS, USDA, REPLY TO SINGELTARY
 
 
 
Friday, January 17, 2014
 
*** Annual report of the Scientific Network on BSE-TSE EFSA, Question No EFSA-Q-2013-01004, approved on 11 December 2013
 
*** O.I.E. FINALLY ADDRESSING CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD RISK FACTORS ***
 
TECHNICAL REPORT
 
 
 
Monday, December 02, 2013
 
*** A parliamentary inquiry has been launched today into the safety of blood, tissue and organ screening following fears that vCJD – the human form of ‘mad cow’ disease – may be being spread by medical procedures
 
 
 
Wednesday, December 11, 2013
 
*** Detection of Infectivity in Blood of Persons with Variant and Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease ***
 
 
 
Friday, August 16, 2013
 
*** Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) biannual update August 2013 U.K. and Contaminated blood products induce a highly atypical prion disease devoid of PrPres in primates
 
 
 
WHAT about the sporadic CJD TSE proteins ?
 
WE now know that some cases of sporadic CJD are linked to atypical BSE and atypical Scrapie, so why are not MORE concerned about the sporadic CJD, and all it’s sub-types $$$
 
Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease CJD cases rising North America updated report August 2013
 
*** Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease CJD cases rising North America with Canada seeing an extreme increase of 48% between 2008 and 2010 ***
 
 
 
Sunday, October 13, 2013
 
*** CJD TSE Prion Disease Cases in Texas by Year, 2003-2012
 
 
 
Sunday, January 19, 2014
 
National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center Cases Examined1 as of January 8, 2014
 
 
 
Friday, January 10, 2014
 
*** vpspr, sgss, sffi, TSE, an iatrogenic by-product of gss, ffi, familial type prion disease, what it ??
 
 
 
Monday, January 13, 2014
 
*** Prions in Variably Protease-Sensitive Prionopathy: An Update Pathogens 2013
 
Pathogens 2013, 2, 457-471; doi:10.3390/pathogens2030457
 
 
 
Wednesday, January 15, 2014
 
*** INFECTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF CJD, VCJD AND OTHER HUMAN PRION DISEASES IN HEALTHCARE AND COMMUNITY SETTINGS Variably Protease-Sensitive Prionopathy (VPSPr) January 15, 2014
 
 
 
Thursday, January 23, 2014
 
Medical Devices Containing Materials Derived from Animal Sources (Except for In Vitro Diagnostic Devices) [Docket No. FDA–2013–D–1574]
 
 
 
kind regards, terry
 
layperson
 
Terry S. Singeltary Sr. flounder9@verizon.net
 
mom dod 12/14/97 confirmed hvCJD...just made a promise, never forget. never let them forget. you don’t brake a promise your mom. ...tss
 
 
 
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