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Emergency Conservation Program Restores Idaho Deer Farm ?

Posted Feb 28 2012 12:58pm
Emergency Conservation Program Restores Idaho Deer Farm



Posted by Candy Moore, Idaho FSA Communications Coordinator and Debbie Carlock, County Executive Director, on February 28, 2012 at 11:15 AM


Ivan and Wilmina Phelps are the proud operators of a European Fallow Deer farm in scenic McCall, Idaho where national forests are the border for many farms. Their story is a tale of hard work, love of the land, care for their animals and survival of the fittest, as the couple recovered from a disaster with help from the Farm Service Agency (FSA).



The Phelps Family raises the deer for venison that they sell at area farmers markets. They also sell to restaurants, stores and direct to consumers. The business started in 1998 with only seven does and one buck. In 2000, the Phelps’ purchased an additional 54 heads and now have a herd of 150.



Gradual expansion has now brought their operation to approximately 50 acres in deer fencing, with seven pastures and some small pens, including a special handling facility, as required by the state.



On June 29, 2010, the McCall area experienced strong windstorms that were unusual for the area. Winds, estimated at 60 to 70 miles per hour, tore through the valley, causing severe damage.



“It came through our farm, uprooting and snapping off over 70 pine trees, many of which were over 100 years old and left a massive mess and huge holes,” Ivan explained. “Most of the damage was to interior fences. But one field, where our un-bred does are kept, had exterior damage. This allowed our herd to escape, but we were able to capture them in two days.”



USDA recognizes that a strong farm safety net is important to sustain the success of American agriculture. To help keep American agriculture profitable, USDA immediately responds to disasters across the country, ranging from record floods, droughts and tropical storms, with direct support, disaster assistance, technical assistance, and access to credit.



The debris from the trees was also scattered throughout the individual pastures, effectively limiting grazing and proper irrigation and destroying several gates and much of the fencing.



The Phelps’ contacted their local FSA office, where they learned about FSA’s Emergency Conservation Program (ECP). Shortly thereafter, their application for emergency cost share under the ECP program was approved.



The Phelps’ had most of the equipment to start on the debris




The Emergency Conservation Program helped the Phelps family save their deer farm after a windstorm.





cleanup. Ivan and his son worked for two months to clear all of the fallen trees and repair the fences and gates. They also had friends who came and helped cut and haul away downed trees. Several of the trees left large root holes that were too big for the Phelps to handle on their own so they had to hire equipment and an operator to clean up the stumps and roots, fill the holes and haul everything away.



“Because we are a small farm, the assistance from the Farm Service Agency was invaluable in helping with the cost of material and the many hours of debris removal,” said Wilmina. “With the dollars we received we were able to get new wire and posts so the work could be completed in a much shorter time frame. We also rotated the deer from field to field more often to allow us to complete the work needed in each area.”



Ivan added, “Without the assistance through the Farm Service Agency we would still be working on the early stages of the wind damage and fencing as the costs and work involved was more than we could handle ourselves.”



Landowners, individuals and communities have endured incredible hardships because of the intensity and volume of natural disasters that have threatened their livelihoods these past few years. The emergency assistance offered by USDA helps to rebuild communities, sustain and spur job creation, and keeps our farmers and ranchers productive and profitable.





Tags: Conservation, Emergency Conservation Program, FSA, Idaho, McCall









http://blogs.usda.gov/2012/02/28/emergency-conservation-program-restores-idaho-deer-farm/









>>> This allowed our herd to escape, but we were able to capture them in two days.<<<




disturbing is an understatement for the above comment, in relations to CWD.


see why ;


SEE CWD MAP, RELATE TO DATES OF GAME FARM INFECTION, TO DATE OF INFECTION RATE IN WILD, SURROUNDING SAID INFECTED GAME FARMS.



http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/18/3/11-0685-f1.htm




*** Chronic Wasting Disease CWD CDC REPORT MARCH 2012 ***



Saturday, February 18, 2012 Occurrence, Transmission, and Zoonotic Potential of Chronic Wasting Disease CDC Volume 18, Number 3—March 2012




http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/ahead-of-print/article/18/3/11-0685_article.htm





SNIP...



Long-term effects of CWD on cervid populations and ecosystems remain unclear as the disease continues to spread and prevalence increases. In captive herds, CWD might persist at high levels and lead to complete herd destruction in the absence of human culling. Epidemiologic modeling suggests the disease could have severe effects on free-ranging deer populations, depending on hunting policies and environmental persistence (8,9). CWD has been associated with large decreases in free-ranging mule deer populations in an area of high CWD prevalence (Boulder, Colorado, USA) (5).



SNIP...



CWD Zoonotic Potential, Species Barriers, and Strains


Current Understanding of the CWD Species



Barrier Strong evidence of zoonotic transmission of BSE to humans has led to concerns about zoonotic transmission of CWD (2,3). As noted above, CWD prions are present nearly ubiquitously throughout diseased hosts, including in muscle, fat, various glands and organs, antler velvet, and peripheral and CNS tissue (2,14,15). Thus, the potential for human exposure to CWD by handling and consumption of infectious cervid material is substantial and increases with increased disease prevalence. Interspecies transmission of prion diseases often yields a species-barrier effect, in which transmission is less efficient compared with intraspecies transmission, as shown by lower attack rates and extended incubation periods (3,28). The species barrier effect is associated with minor differences in PrPc sequence and structure between the host and target species (3). Prion strain (discussed below) and route of inoculation also affect the species barrier (3,28). For instance, interspecies transmission by intracerebral inoculation is often possible but oral challenge is completely ineffective (29). Most epidemiologic studies and experimental work have suggested that the potential for CWD transmission to humans is low, and such transmission has not been documented through ongoing surveillance (2,3). In vitro prion replication assays report a relatively low efficiency of CWD PrPSc-directed conversion of human PrPc to PrPSc (30), and transgenic mice overexpressing human PrPc are resistant to CWD infection (31); these findings indicate low zoonotic potential. However, squirrel monkeys are susceptible to CWD by intracerebral and oral inoculation (32). Cynomolgus macaques, which are evolutionarily closer to humans than squirrel monkeys, are resistant to CWD infection (32). Regardless, the finding that a primate is orally susceptible to CWD is of concern. Interspecies transmission of CWD to noncervids has not been observed under natural conditions. CWD infection of carcass scavengers such as raccoons, opossums, and coyotes was not observed in a recent study in Wisconsin (22). In addition, natural transmission of CWD to cattle has not been observed in experimentally controlled natural exposure studies or targeted surveillance (2). However, CWD has been experimentally transmitted to cattle, sheep, goats, mink, ferrets, voles, and mice by intracerebral inoculation (2,29,33). CWD is likely transmitted among mule, white-tailed deer, and elk without a major species barrier (1), and other members of the cervid family, including reindeer, caribou, and other species of deer worldwide, may be vulnerable to CWD infection. Black-tailed deer (a subspecies of mule deer) and European red deer (Cervus elaphus) are susceptible to CWD by natural routes of infection (1,34). Fallow deer (Dama dama) are susceptible to CWD by intracerebral inoculation (35).



Continued study of CWD susceptibility in other cervids is of considerable interest. Reasons for Caution There are several reasons for caution with respect to zoonotic and interspecies CWD transmission. First, there is strong evidence that distinct CWD strains exist (36). Prion strains are distinguished by varied incubation periods, clinical symptoms, PrPSc conformations, and CNS PrPSc depositions (3,32). Strains have been identified in other natural prion diseases, including scrapie, BSE, and CJD (3). Intraspecies and interspecies transmission of prions from CWD-positive deer and elk isolates resulted in identification of 2 strains of CWD in rodent models (36), indicating that CWD strains likely exist in cervids. However, nothing is currently known about natural distribution and prevalence of CWD strains. Currently, host range and pathogenicity vary with prion strain (28,37). Therefore, zoonotic potential of CWD may also vary with CWD strain. In addition, diversity in host (cervid) and target (e.g., human) genotypes further complicates definitive findings of zoonotic and interspecies transmission potentials of CWD.






Intraspecies and interspecies passage of the CWD agent may also increase the risk for zoonotic CWD transmission. The CWD prion agent is undergoing serial passage naturally as the disease continues to emerge. In vitro and in vivo intraspecies transmission of the CWD agent yields PrPSc with an increased capacity to convert human PrPc to PrPSc (30). Interspecies prion transmission can alter CWD host range (38) and yield multiple novel prion strains (3,28). The potential for interspecies CWD transmission (by cohabitating mammals) will only increase as the disease spreads and CWD prions continue to be shed into the environment. This environmental passage itself may alter CWD prions or exert selective pressures on CWD strain mixtures by interactions with soil, which are known to vary with prion strain (25), or exposure to environmental or gut degradation.







Given that prion disease in humans can be difficult to diagnose and the asymptomatic incubation period can last decades, continued research, epidemiologic surveillance, and caution in handling risky material remain prudent as CWD continues to spread and the opportunity for interspecies transmission increases. Otherwise, similar to what occurred in the United Kingdom after detection of variant CJD and its subsequent link to BSE, years of prevention could be lost if zoonotic transmission of CWD is subsequently identified,




SNIP...






*** Chronic Wasting Disease CWD CDC REPORT MARCH 2012 ***


Saturday, February 18, 2012


Occurrence, Transmission, and Zoonotic Potential of Chronic Wasting Disease


CDC Volume 18, Number 3—March 2012



http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/ahead-of-print/article/18/3/11-0685_article.htm








see much more here ;




http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/02/occurrence-transmission-and-zoonotic.html










Can J Vet Res. 2011 April; 75(2): 152–156.



PMCID: PMC3062927


Copyright and/or publishing rights held by the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association


Experimental transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD) from elk and white-tailed deer to fallow deer by intracerebral route: Final report


Amir N. Hamir, Justin J. Greenlee, Eric M. Nicholson, Robert A. Kunkle, Juergen A. Richt, Janice M. Miller, and Mark Hall


National Animal Disease Center (NADC), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), 1920 Dayton Avenue, PO Box 70, Ames, Iowa (Hamir, Greenlee, Nicholson, Kunkle, Richt, Miller); and Pathobiology Laboratory, NVSL, USDA, 1920 Dayton Road, Ames, Iowa (Hall)


Address all correspondence to Dr. Hamir; telephone: (713) 792-2797; fax: (713) 794-4546; e-mail: ahamir@mdanderson.org


Dr. Hamir’s current address is Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery — Unit 63, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Room 4055C, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.


Dr. Richt’s current address is Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, Kansas State University, K224B Mosier Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506, USA.


Received February 23, 2010; Accepted May 9, 2010.


Other Sections▼




Abstract



Final observations on experimental transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD) from elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) to fallow deer (Dama dama) are reported herein. During the 5-year study, 13 fawns were inoculated intracerebrally with CWD-infected brain material from white-tailed deer (n = 7; Group A) or elk (n = 6; Group B), and 3 other fawns were kept as uninoculated controls (Group C). As described previously, 3 CWD-inoculated deer were euthanized at 7.6 mo post-inoculation (MPI). None revealed presence of abnormal prion protein (PrPd) in their tissues. At 24 (Group A) and 26 (Group B) MPI, 2 deer were necropsied. Both animals had a small focal accumulation of PrPd in their midbrains. Between 29 and 37 MPI, 3 other deer (all from Group A) were euthanized. The 5 remaining deer became sick and were euthanized between 51 and 60 MPI (1 from Group A and 4 from Group B). Microscopic lesions of spongiform encephalopathy (SE) were observed in only these 5 animals; however, PrPd was detected in tissues of the central nervous system by immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and by commercial rapid test in all animals that survived beyond 24 MPI. This study demonstrates that intracerebrally inoculated fallow deer not only amplify CWD prions, but also develop lesions of spongiform encephalopathy.




http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3062927/







Tuesday, February 14, 2012


White House budget proposes cuts to ag programs including TSE PRION disease aka mad cow type disease


http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2012/02/white-house-budget-proposes-cuts-to-ag.html








50 GAME FARMS IN USA INFECTED WITH CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD




2012


Tuesday, December 20, 2011


CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD WISCONSIN Almond Deer (Buckhorn Flats) Farm Update DECEMBER 2011



> > > The CWD infection rate was nearly 80%, the highest ever in a North American captive herd.


Despite the five year premise plan and site decontamination, The WI DNR has concerns over the bioavailability of infectious prions at this site to wild white-tail deer should these fences be removed. Current research indicates that prions can persist in soil for a minimum of 3 years.


However, Georgsson et al. (2006) concluded that prions that produced scrapie disease in sheep remained bioavailable and infectious for at least 16 years in natural Icelandic environments, most likely in contaminated soil.


Additionally, the authors reported that from 1978-2004, scrapie recurred on 33 sheep farms, of which 9 recurrences occurred 14-21 years after initial culling and subsequent restocking efforts; these findings further emphasize the effect of environmental contamination on sustaining TSE infectivity and that long-term persistence of prions in soils may be substantially greater than previously thought. < < <




http://dnr.wi.gov/org/nrboard/2011/december/12-11-2b2.pdf








SNIP...SEE FULL TEXT ;



http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2011/12/chronic-wasting-disease-cwd-wisconsin.html







Thursday, February 09, 2012


50 GAME FARMS IN USA INFECTED WITH CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/02/50-game-farms-to-date-in-usa-infected.html








Friday, February 03, 2012


Wisconsin Farm-Raised Deer Farms and CWD there from 2012 report Singeltary et al


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/02/wisconsin-farm-raised-deer-farms-and.html






Saturday, February 04, 2012


Wisconsin 16 age limit on testing dead deer Game Farm CWD Testing Protocol Needs To Be Revised


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/02/wisconsin-16-age-limit-on-testing-dead.html







Thursday, February 09, 2012


Colorado Farm-Raised Deer Farms and CWD there from 2012 report Singeltary et al


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/02/colorado-farm-raised-deer-farms-and-cwd.html






Tuesday, February 14, 2012


Oppose Indiana House Bill 1265 game farming cervids


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/02/oppose-indiana-house-bill-1265-game.html






Monday, February 13, 2012


Stop White-tailed Deer Farming from Destroying Tennessee's Priceless Wild Deer Herd oppose HB3164


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/02/stop-white-tailed-deer-farming-from.html






Wednesday, February 15, 2012


West Virginia Deer Farming Bill backed by deer farmers advances, why ? BE WARNED CWD


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/02/west-virginia-deer-farming-bill-backed.html







Sunday, January 22, 2012


Chronic Wasting Disease CWD cervids interspecies transmission


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/01/chronic-wasting-disease-cwd-cervids.html







now, a few things to ponder about those said double fences that will supposedly stop those deer from escaping.




what about water that drains from any of these game farms. surrounding water tables etc., are the double fences going to stop the water from becoming contaminated? where does it drain? who's drinking it?




Detection of Protease-Resistant Prion Protein in Water from a CWD-Endemic Area




65




Tracy A. Nichols*1,2, Bruce Pulford1, Christy Wyckoff1,2, Crystal Meyerett1, Brady Michel1, Kevin Gertig3, Jean E. Jewell4, Glenn C. Telling5 and M.D. Zabel1 1Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA 2National Wildlife Research Center, Wildlife Services, United States Department of Agriculture, Fort Collins, Colorado, 80521, USA 3Fort Collins Water and Treatment Operations, Fort Collins, Colorado, 80521, USA 4 Department of Veterinary Sciences, Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming, 82070, USA 5Department of Microbiology, Immunology, Molecular Genetics and Neurology, Sanders Brown Center on Aging, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 40536, USA * Corresponding author- tracy.a.nichols@aphis.usda.gov




Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is the only known transmissible spongiform encephalopathy affecting free-ranging wildlife. Experimental and epidemiological data indicate that CWD can be transmitted horizontally and via blood and saliva, although the exact mode of natural transmission remains unknown. Substantial evidence suggests that prions can persist in the environment, implicating it as a potential prion reservoir and transmission vehicle. CWD- positive animals can contribute to environmental prion load via biological materials including saliva, blood, urine and feces, shedding several times their body weight in possibly infectious excreta in their lifetime, as well as through decomposing carcasses. Sensitivity limitations of conventional assays hamper evaluation of environmental prion loads in water. Here we show the ability of serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA) to amplify minute amounts of CWD prions in spiked water samples at a 1:1 x106 , and protease-resistant prions in environmental and municipal-processing water samples from a CWD endemic area. Detection of CWD prions correlated with increased total organic carbon in water runoff from melting winter snowpack. These data suggest prolonged persistence and accumulation of prions in the environment that may promote CWD transmission.




snip...




The data presented here demonstrate that sPMCA can detect low levels of PrPCWD in the environment, corroborate previous biological and experimental data suggesting long term persistence of prions in the environment2,3 and imply that PrPCWD accumulation over time may contribute to transmission of CWD in areas where it has been endemic for decades. This work demonstrates the utility of sPMCA to evaluate other environmental water sources for PrPCWD, including smaller bodies of water such as vernal pools and wallows, where large numbers of cervids congregate and into which prions from infected animals may be shed and concentrated to infectious levels.




snip...end...full text at ;



http://www.landesbioscience.com/






http://www.cwd-info.org/pdf/3rd_CWD_Symposium_utah.pdf






http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/08/third-international-cwd-symposium-july.html






http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/10/detection-of-protease-resistant-cervid.html







what about rodents there from? 4 American rodents are susceptible to CWD to date. are those double fences going to stop these rodents from escaping these game farms once becoming exposed to CWD?




Chronic Wasting Disease Susceptibility of Four North American Rodents





Chad J. Johnson1*, Jay R. Schneider2, Christopher J. Johnson2, Natalie A. Mickelsen2, Julia A. Langenberg3, Philip N. Bochsler4, Delwyn P. Keane4, Daniel J. Barr4, and Dennis M. Heisey2 1University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Comparative Biosciences, 1656 Linden Drive, Madison WI 53706, USA 2US Geological Survey, National Wildlife Health Center, 6006 Schroeder Road, Madison WI 53711, USA 3Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, 101 South Webster Street, Madison WI 53703, USA 4Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Lab, 445 Easterday Lane, Madison WI 53706, USA *Corresponding author email: cjohnson@svm.vetmed.wisc.edu





We intracerebrally challenged four species of native North American rodents that inhabit locations undergoing cervid chronic wasting disease (CWD) epidemics. The species were: deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), white-footed mice (P. leucopus), meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus), and red-backed voles (Myodes gapperi). The inocula were prepared from the brains of hunter-harvested white-tailed deer from Wisconsin that tested positive for CWD. Meadow voles proved to be most susceptible, with a median incubation period of 272 days. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of PrPd in the brains of all challenged meadow voles. Subsequent passages in meadow voles lead to a significant reduction in incubation period. The disease progression in red-backed voles, which are very closely related to the European bank vole (M. glareolus) which have been demonstrated to be sensitive to a number of TSEs, was slower than in meadow voles with a median incubation period of 351 days. We sequenced the meadow vole and red-backed vole Prnp genes and found three amino acid (AA) differences outside of the signal and GPI anchor sequences. Of these differences (T56-, G90S, S170N; read-backed vole:meadow vole), S170N is particularly intriguing due its postulated involvement in "rigid loop" structure and CWD susceptibility. Deer mice did not exhibit disease signs until nearly 1.5 years post-inoculation, but appear to be exhibiting a high degree of disease penetrance. White-footed mice have an even longer incubation period but are also showing high penetrance. Second passage experiments show significant shortening of incubation periods. Meadow voles in particular appear to be interesting lab models for CWD. These rodents scavenge carrion, and are an important food source for many predator species. Furthermore, these rodents enter human and domestic livestock food chains by accidental inclusion in grain and forage. Further investigation of these species as potential hosts, bridge species, and reservoirs of CWD is required.







http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/08/third-international-cwd-symposium-july.html






please see ;


http://www.cwd-info.org/pdf/3rd_CWD_Symposium_utah.pdf









Oral.29: Susceptibility of Domestic Cats to CWD Infection




Amy Nalls, Nicholas J. Haley, Jeanette Hayes-Klug, Kelly Anderson, Davis M. Seelig, Dan S. Bucy, Susan L. Kraft, Edward A. Hoover and Candace K. Mathiason† Colorado State University; Fort Collins, CO USA†Presenting author; Email: ckm@lamar.colostate.edu




Domestic and non-domestic cats have been shown to be susceptible to one prion disease, feline spongiform encephalopathy (FSE), thought to be transmitted through consumption of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) contaminated meat. Because domestic and free ranging felids scavenge cervid carcasses, including those in CWD affected areas, we evaluated the susceptibility of domestic cats to CWD infection experimentally. Groups of n = 5 cats each were inoculated either intracerebrally (IC) or orally (PO) with CWD deer brain homogenate. Between 40–43 months following IC inoculation, two cats developed mild but progressive symptoms including weight loss, anorexia, polydipsia, patterned motor behaviors and ataxia—ultimately mandating euthanasia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the brain of one of these animals (vs. two age-matched controls) performed just before euthanasia revealed increased ventricular system volume, more prominent sulci, and T2 hyperintensity deep in the white matter of the frontal hemisphere and in cortical grey distributed through the brain, likely representing inflammation or gliosis. PrPRES and widely distributed peri-neuronal vacuoles were demonstrated in the brains of both animals by immunodetection assays. No clinical signs of TSE have been detected in the remaining primary passage cats after 80 months pi. Feline-adapted CWD was sub-passaged into groups (n=4 or 5) of cats by IC, PO, and IP/SQ routes. Currently, at 22 months pi, all five IC inoculated cats are demonstrating abnormal behavior including increasing aggressiveness, pacing, and hyper responsiveness. Two of these cats have developed rear limb ataxia. Although the limited data from this ongoing study must be considered preliminary, they raise the potential for cervid-to-feline transmission in nature.





www.landesbioscience.com Prion






http://www.prion2011.ca/files/PRION_2011_-_Posters_(May_5-11).pdf







http://felinespongiformencephalopathyfse.blogspot.com/2011/08/susceptibility-of-domestic-cats-to-cwd.html








see what CWD did with first and second passage of testing in the lab to cattle ;





first passage ;



These findings demonstrate that when CWD is directly inoculated into the brain of cattle, 86% of inoculated cattle develop clinical signs of the disease.



http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publications.htm?seq_no_115=194089







second passage


Beginning 10-12 months post inoculation (PI), all inoculates lost appetite and weight. Five animals subsequently developed clinical signs of central nervous system (CNS) abnormality. By 16.5 months PI, all cattle had been euthanized because of poor prognosis. None of the animals showed microscopic lesions of spongiform encephalopathy (SE) but the CWD agent was detected in their CNS tissues by 2 laboratory techniques (IHC and WB). These findings demonstrate that inoculated cattle amplify CWD agent but also develop clinical CNS signs without manifestation of microscopic lesions of SE. This situation has also been shown to occur following inoculation of cattle with another TSE agent, namely, sheep scrapie.



http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publications.htm?seq_no_115=178318








Chronic Wasting Disease CWD cervids interspecies transmission



Wednesday, January 5, 2011




ENLARGING SPECTRUM OF PRION-LIKE DISEASES Prusiner Colby et al 2011 Prions




David W. Colby1,* and Stanley B. Prusiner1,2




+ Author Affiliations




1Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 2Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 Correspondence: stanley@ind.ucsf.edu






SNIP...



Greetings,





I believe the statement and quote below is incorrect ;



"CWD has been transmitted to cattle after intracerebral inoculation, although the infection rate was low (4 of 13 animals [Hamir et al. 2001]). This finding raised concerns that CWD prions might be transmitted to cattle grazing in contaminated pastures."



Please see ;



Within 26 months post inoculation, 12 inoculated animals had lost weight, revealed abnormal clinical signs, and were euthanatized. Laboratory tests revealed the presence of a unique pattern of the disease agent in tissues of these animals. These findings demonstrate that when CWD is directly inoculated into the brain of cattle, 86% of inoculated cattle develop clinical signs of the disease.




http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publications.htm?seq_no_115=194089







"although the infection rate was low (4 of 13 animals [Hamir et al. 2001])."





shouldn't this be corrected, 86% is NOT a low rate. ...




kindest regards,




Terry S. Singeltary Sr. P.O. Box 42 Bacliff, Texas USA 77518




MARCH 1, 2011




UPDATED CORRESPONDENCE FROM AUTHORS OF THIS STUDY I.E. COLBY, PRUSINER ET AL, ABOUT MY CONCERNS OF THE DISCREPANCY BETWEEN THEIR FIGURES AND MY FIGURES OF THE STUDIES ON CWD TRANSMISSION TO CATTLE ;







----- Original Message -----





From: David Colby




To: flounder9@verizon.net




Cc: stanley@XXXXXXXX




Sent: Tuesday, March 01, 2011 8:25 AM




Subject: Re: FW: re-Prions David W. Colby1,* and Stanley B. Prusiner1,2 + Author Affiliations




Dear Terry Singeltary,



Thank you for your correspondence regarding the review article Stanley Prusiner and I recently wrote for Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives. Dr. Prusiner asked that I reply to your message due to his busy schedule. We agree that the transmission of CWD prions to beef livestock would be a troubling development and assessing that risk is important. In our article, we cite a peer-reviewed publication reporting confirmed cases of laboratory transmission based on stringent criteria. The less stringent criteria for transmission described in the abstract you refer to lead to the discrepancy between your numbers and ours and thus the interpretation of the transmission rate. We stand by our assessment of the literature--namely that the transmission rate of CWD to bovines appears relatively low, but we recognize that even a low transmission rate could have important implications for public health and we thank you for bringing attention to this matter.





Warm Regards, David Colby




--




David Colby, PhDAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Chemical EngineeringUniversity of Delaware




====================END...TSS==============








SNIP...SEE FULL TEXT ;


http://betaamyloidcjd.blogspot.com/2011/01/enlarging-spectrum-of-prion-like.html








Monday, October 10, 2011


EFSA Journal 2011 The European Response to BSE: A Success Story


snip...



EFSA and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) recently delivered a scientific opinion on any possible epidemiological or molecular association between TSEs in animals and humans (EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ) and ECDC, 2011). This opinion confirmed Classical BSE prions as the only TSE agents demonstrated to be zoonotic so far but the possibility that a small proportion of human cases so far classified as "sporadic" CJD are of zoonotic origin could not be excluded. Moreover, transmission experiments to non-human primates suggest that some TSE agents in addition to Classical BSE prions in cattle (namely L-type Atypical BSE, Classical BSE in sheep, transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) and chronic wasting disease (CWD) agents) might have zoonotic potential.



snip...





http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/efsajournal/pub/e991.htm?emt=1






http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/efsajournal/doc/e991.pdf








see follow-up here about North America BSE Mad Cow TSE prion risk factors, and the ever emerging strains of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy in many species here in the USA, including humans ;





http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2011/10/efsa-journal-2011-european-response-to.html







Thursday, February 16, 2012




Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy BSE




31 USA SENATORS ASK PRESIDENT OBAMA TO HELP SPREAD MAD COW DISEASE 2012




http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2012/02/bovine-spongiform-encephalopathy-bse-31.html






kind regards,
terry




layperson


Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
P.O. Box 42
Bacliff, Texas USA 77518
flounder9@verizon.net





http://blogs.usda.gov/2012/02/28/emergency-conservation-program-restores-idaho-deer-farm/
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