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CWD UPDATE DEER FARMS CAPTIVE SHOOTING PEN OWNERS Iowa SENATE FILE 59 BY Senator Dick L. Dearden

Posted Feb 04 2013 10:24pm
CWD UPDATE DEER FARMS CAPTIVE SHOOTING PEN OWNERS Iowa SENATE FILE 59 BY Senator Dick L. Dearden





Senate File 59 - Introduced SENATE FILE 59 BY DEARDEN



A BILL FOR
An Act relating to the keeping of farm deer and preserve


1 whitetail and including penalties and applicability



2 provisions.



3 BE IT ENACTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF IOWA:



4 TLSB 1249XS (9) 85 av/sc






7 2. Farm deer that die or are sent for slaughter shall 8 be tested for chronic wasting disease as set forth in rules 9 adopted by the department. The landowner who keeps such farm 10 deer shall pay the full cost of the testing. snip... 30 2. a. An initial application for registration under 31 subsection 1 shall be accompanied by a surety or cash 32 performance bond in conformity with rules adopted by the 33 department, in the principal amount of a minimum of one hundred 34 thousand dollars. The bond shall be executed by a surety 35 company authorized to do business in this state, and the bond 1 shall be continuous in nature until canceled by the surety with 2 not less than sixty days’ written notice to both the landowner 3 and to the department. The notice shall indicate the surety’s 4 intent to cancel the bond on a date at least sixty days after 5 the date of the notice. 6 b. The bond shall be payable to the state to indemnify the 7 state for any costs that may be incurred in the event that a 8 confirmed case of chronic wasting disease is found in farm deer 9 kept by the applicant who purchased the bond. snip... 19 Sec. 7. Section 170.4, Code 2013, is amended to read as 20 follows: 21 170.4 Requirements for keeping whitetail —— fence fencing 22 certification. 23 A landowner shall not keep whitetail as farm deer, unless the 24 whitetail is kept on land which is enclosed by a double fence , 25 which includes a perimeter fence around the enclosed area and 26 a secondary fence that is a minimum of thirty feet inside the 27 perimeter fence . The fence fences must be constructed and 28 maintained as prescribed by rules adopted by the department. A 29 landowner shall not keep the whitetail unless the fence fencing 30 is certified in a manner and according to procedures required 31 by the department. The fence fences shall be constructed and 32 maintained to ensure that whitetail are kept in the enclosure 33 and that other deer are excluded from the enclosure. A fence 34 that is constructed on or after May 23, 2003, The fences shall 35 be at least eight ten feet in height above ground level. The 1 department of agriculture and land stewardship may shall 2 require that the fence is fencing be inspected and approved 3 prior to certification. The department of natural resources 4 may periodically inspect the fence fencing according to 5 appointment with the enclosure’s landowner. 6 Sec. 8. NEW SECTION . 170.4A Missing or escaped farm deer. 7 A landowner who keeps farm deer shall notify the department 8 within forty-eight hours of discovering that a farm deer has 9 escaped or is missing from enclosed land. A farm deer that 10 has escaped or is missing from enclosed land for more than ten 11 days shall be subject to the jurisdiction of the department of 12 natural resources. snip... 19 Farm deer that die or are sent for slaughter must be tested 20 for chronic wasting disease pursuant to rules adopted by DALS, 21 and the landowner must pay the full cost of the testing. 22 A landowner who keeps farm deer must register with DALS by 23 June 30 each year. In order to register, the landowner must 24 meet the fencing certification requirements, show proof of 25 financial responsibility via a surety or cash performance bond, 26 and pay a registration fee of $5,000 per year. The surety or 27 cash performance bond must be in a minimum amount of $100,000, 28 payable to indemnify the state in the event that a confirmed 29 case of chronic wasting disease is found in farm deer kept by 30 the landowner. Registration fees are placed in the farm deer 31 administration fund and appropriated to DALS for the purpose of 32 administering the chronic wasting disease control program. 33 The bill requires that fencing enclosing land on which 34 whitetail are kept as farm deer must include a perimeter 35 fence around the enclosed area and a secondary fence that is
1 a minimum of 30 feet inside the perimeter fence, must be 10
2 feet tall instead of eight feet tall, and must be inspected 3 and approved prior to certification of the fencing. The 4 new requirements are applicable to fencing that is newly 5 constructed on or after July 1, 2013, when the bill takes 6 effect, and are applicable on or after July 1, 2014, to fences 7 existing before July 1, 2013. 8 A landowner who keeps farm deer shall notify DALS within 48 9 hours of discovering that a farm deer has escaped or is missing 10 from enclosed land. A farm deer that has escaped or is missing 11 for more than 10 days is subject to the jurisdiction of the 12 department of natural resources. 13 A landowner’s registration may be suspended or revoked for 14 failure to maintain proof of financial responsibility, or 15 for falsely claiming that a farm deer died or was sent for 16 slaughter when the farm deer escaped or was otherwise sold. A 17 person who makes such a false claim is also subject to a civil 18 penalty of $5,000, which will be deposited in the farm deer 19 administration fund. 20 DIVISION II. Division II of the bill relates to regulation 21 of the keeping of preserve whitetail on a hunting preserve, 22 which is principally under the purview of the department of 23 natural resources (department). 24 The bill requires that a landowner cannot keep whitetail on 25 a hunting preserve unless the preserve is enclosed by double 26 fencing that includes a perimeter fence around the enclosed 27 area and a secondary fence that is a minimum of 30 feet inside 28 the perimeter fence. The fence must be at least 10 feet in 29 height. The fencing requirements are applicable to fences 30 that are newly constructed on or after July 1, 2013, when the 31 bill takes effect, and is applicable on or after July 1, 2014, 32 to fences existing before July 1, 2013. The department must 33 inspect and approve the fencing prior to certification. 34 Whitetail kept on a hunting preserve must also bear an 35 ear tag, tattoo, or other identification as specified in 1 the bill. Preserve whitetail previously kept as farm deer 2 that are released on a hunting preserve shall maintain the 3 identification affixed on them pursuant to the requirements 4 applicable to farm deer under Code chapter 170 and rules 5 adopted to implement that Code chapter. 6 A landowner who keeps whitetail on a hunting preserve must 7 register each year and pay the registration fee of $5,000. A 8 landowner cannot be registered unless the landowner meets the 9 applicable fencing certification and other requirements of Code 10 chapter 484C. The initial application for registration must 11 include proof of financial responsibility via a surety or cash 12 performance bond. The surety or cash performance bond must be 13 in a minimum amount of $100,000, payable to indemnify the state 14 in the event that a confirmed case of chronic wasting disease 15 is found in preserve whitetail kept by the landowner. 16 Preserve whitetail that die or are taken by persons hunting 17 on the hunting preserve shall be tested for chronic wasting 18 disease as set forth in rules adopted by the department. The 19 landowner or the hunter taking the preserve whitetail shall pay 20 the full cost of the testing. 21 A person who removes the required identification from a 22 preserve whitetail, prior to the taking of the whitetail, is 23 subject to a civil penalty of $500. 23 -12- LSB 1249XS (9) 85 av/sc 12/ 12 http://coolice.legis.iowa.gov/Cool-ICE/default.asp?Category=BillInfo&Service=Billbook&ga=85&hbill=SF59
In my opinion, this is a band aid approach to something that need a tourniquet a long, long time ago.
CWD TSE prion disease know no age groups, they know no borders. all cervids need to be CWD tested, of all age groups, on every farm, every year.
whining about those few dollars above, is nothing compared to what happened at one cervid cwd infected facility at the Buckhorn Flats in Wisconsin. that one CWD captive blunder cost them so far ;
RECOMMENDATION: That the Board approve the purchase of 80 acres of land for $465,000 for the Statewide Wildlife Habitat Program in Portage County and approve the restrictions on public use of the site.
how many captive shooting pens in Wisconsin?
how many spread across the USA?
the captive shooting pen industry, in my honest opinion, is nothing more than a petri dish for CWD, there an accident and a threat to the wild herds waiting to happen. ...TSS
Since the 1980s CWD has been detected in 19 states, including West Virginia (2005), Virginia (2010), and Maryland (2011). CWD is a fatal and debilitating disease that has caused serious ecological and economic impact in areas where it has become established. Due to the severity of the potential impacts from CWD, extensive surveillance programs that monitor CWD distribution and prevalence have been instituted nationwide. In order to minimize the threat of its importation and establishment, North Carolina in 2003 implemented stringent requirements and restrictions on importation and confinement of cervids. These requirements are instrumental in preventing the establishment of CWD. Modeling research in the state of Wisconsin where CWD was detected in 2002 suggests that, if left unmanaged, CWD will spread throughout Wisconsin resulting in an infection rate in adult deer of at least 40%. These research results are mirrored by current data in Colorado and Wyoming, where in some areas average infection rates exceed 40% across thousands of square miles, suggesting the disease continues to spread widely across the landscape. Our actions are intended to avoid these consequences in North Carolina. http://www.ncwildlife.org/News/WildlifeEmailUpdate/093011.aspx
Wisconsin has now spent more than 50 million dollars, and CWD is spreading into additional counties every few years. Wisconsin predicts that eventually CWD will affect 40% of all adult deer in that state.
WISCONSIN SHOOTING PEN GAME FARM HAD THE HIGHEST INFECTION RATE EVER DOCUMENTED AT 80% INFECTION RATE FOR CWD...
Tuesday, December 20, 2011
CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD WISCONSIN Almond Deer (Buckhorn Flats) Farm Update DECEMBER 2011
The CWD infection rate was nearly 80%, the highest ever in a North American captive herd.
RECOMMENDATION: That the Board approve the purchase of 80 acres of land for $465,000 for the Statewide Wildlife Habitat Program in Portage County and approve the restrictions on public use of the site.
Form 1100-001 (R 2/11) NATURAL RESOURCES BOARD AGENDA ITEM
SUBJECT: Information Item: Almond Deer Farm Update
FOR: DECEMBER 2011 BOARD MEETING TUESDAY TO BE PRESENTED BY TITLE: Tami Ryan, Wildlife Health Section Chief
SUMMARY:
>>>When we looked at all sampling from DMU 70 (70, 70A, B, C, D, E and G), the average percentage of all bucks from that DMU was 27.4% prior to 2007 and 40.8% from 2007-2011. Average sampling for does was 28.1% prior to 2007 and 38.2% from 2007-2011.<<<
There appear to be two separate data sets regarding ages of deer harvested or removed from the CWD Zone. One set is designated as from opening weekend harvest data for 1992-2011, with some data missing (1992, 2004-2006). The second represents a separate dataset taken from deer sampled for CWD.
The new 15-year management plan (WDNR 2010) stresses there has been an increase in infection rates within the DEZ (cf., Fig. 4 in document; Fig. 14 here):
“Since 2002, prevalence in the western core among adult males has risen from about 10% to over 12%, and in adult females from about 4% to about 6%. In the same area during the same period, prevalence in yearling males has increased from about 2% to about 4%, and in yearling females from 2% to nearly 6%.”
We next turned to sampling effort in regard to geospatial distribution of samples. In 2002, there were 19 sampling units represented by 50+ samples, yet by 2011 the number was reduced to 10 (Fig. 18). Finally, we examined the trend in proportional sampling from the core of the CWD DEZ (DMU70-A); viz., the proportion of total sampling effort from this DMU (Fig. 19). The percentage of samples from DMU 70-A declined until 2007, when average percentage of the total samples increased to 23.1% for bucks and 21.5% for does. When we looked at all sampling from DMU 70 (70, 70A, B, C, D, E and G), the average percentage of all bucks from that DMU was 27.4% prior to 2007 and 40.8% from 2007-2011. Average sampling for does was 28.1% prior to 2007 and 38.2% from 2007-2011. Non-uniform sampling probably affected estimates of infection rates within the DEZ significantly.
Friday, June 01, 2012
*** TEXAS DEER CZAR TO WISCONSIN ASK TO EXPLAIN COMMENTS
Tuesday, July 10, 2012
Chronic Wasting Disease Detected in Far West Texas
see history of my failed attempts to get the TAHC to start testing for CWD in far west Texas started back in 2001 – 2002 ;
Saturday, July 07, 2012
TEXAS Animal Health Commission Accepting Comments on Chronic Wasting Disease Rule Proposal
Considering the seemingly high CWD prevalence rate in the Sacramento and Hueco Mountains of New Mexico, CWD may be well established in the population and in the environment in Texas at this time.
Thursday, March 29, 2012
TEXAS DEER CZAR SAYS WISCONSIN DNR NOT DOING ENOUGH ABOUT CWD LIKE POT CALLING KETTLE BLACK
Tuesday, December 18, 2012
A Growing Threat How deer breeding could put public trust wildlife at risk
Wednesday, November 14, 2012
PENNSYLVANIA 2012 THE GREAT ESCAPE OF CWD INVESTIGATION MOVES INTO LOUISIANA and INDIANA
Monday, January 16, 2012
9 GAME FARMS IN WISCONSIN TEST POSITIVE FOR CWD
see full text and more here ;
2010 WISCONSIN CAPTIVE DEER ESCAPES
There were 26 reported escape incidents so far this year, this amounted to 20 actual confirmed escape incidents because 3 were previously reported, 2 were confirmed as wild deer, and 1 incident was not confirmed. ...
snip...
C. & D. Captive Cervid and Law Enforcement Update (11:10 AM)- Warden Pete Dunn gave the captive cervid farm update. There were 26 reported escape incidents so far this year, this amounted to 20 actual confirmed escape incidents because 3 were previously reported, 2 were confirmed as wild deer, and 1 incident was not confirmed. Approximately 30% of these escapes were caused by gates being left open and the other 70% resulted from bad fencing or fence related issues. The 20 actual confirmed escape incidents amounted to 77 total animals. 50 of the escaped animals were recovered or killed and 27 were not recovered and remain unaccounted for. Last year the CWD Committee passed a resolution to require double gates, but this has not gone into effect yet. Questions were raised by the committee about double fencing requirements? Pete responded that double fencing has not been practical or accepted by the industry. The DNR has the authority to do fence inspections. ?If a fence fails to pass the inspection the fencing certificate can be revoked and the farmer can be issued a citation. This year three citations and one warning have been issued for escapes. Pete reviewed the reporting requirements for escape incidents that these must be reported within 24 hours. The farmer then has 72 hours to recover the animals or else it will affect the farm’s herd status and ability to move animals. Davin proposed in the 15 year CWD Plan that the DNR take total control and regulatory authority over all deer farm fencing. Larry Gohlke asked Pete about the reliability for reporting escapes? Pete said that the majority of escapes were reported by the farmer, but it is very difficult to determine when an escape actually occurred. Pete said that they are more concerned that an escape is reported and not that it is reported at the exact time that it happened.
Thursday, February 09, 2012
50 GAME FARMS IN USA INFECTED WITH CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE
Synopsis
Occurrence, Transmission, and Zoonotic Potential of Chronic Wasting Disease
snip...
CWD has been identified in free-ranging cervids in 15 US states and 2 Canadian provinces and in ≈100 captive herds in 15 states and provinces and in South Korea (Figure 1, panel B).
snip...
Most epidemiologic studies and experimental work have suggested that the potential for CWD transmission to humans is low, and such transmission has not been documented through ongoing surveillance (2,3). In vitro prion replication assays report a relatively low efficiency of CWD PrPSc-directed conversion of human PrPc to PrPSc (30), and transgenic mice overexpressing human PrPc are resistant to CWD infection (31); these findings indicate low zoonotic potential. However, squirrel monkeys are susceptible to CWD by intracerebral and oral inoculation (32). Cynomolgus macaques, which are evolutionarily closer to humans than squirrel monkeys, are resistant to CWD infection (32). Regardless, the finding that a primate is orally susceptible to CWD is of concern...
snip...
INDIANA 20 DEER ESCAPE TROPHY BUCK GAME FARM STATE OFFICIALS FEAR CWD RISK TO WILD
Sunday, January 06, 2013
USDA TO PGC ONCE CAPTIVES ESCAPE "it‘s no longer its business.”
Wednesday, January 23, 2013
Missouri sixth case CWD documented northwest Macon County
Friday, August 31, 2012
COMMITTEE ON CAPTIVE WILDLIFE AND ALTERNATIVE LIVESTOCK and CWD 2009-2012 a review
Tuesday, June 05, 2012
Captive Deer Breeding Legislation Overwhelmingly Defeated During 2012 Legislative Session
Sunday, January 27, 2013
Indiana 6 deer missing from farm pose health risk to state herds
Friday, November 09, 2012
*** Chronic Wasting Disease CWD in cervidae and transmission to other species
Friday, December 14, 2012
*** Susceptibility Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in wild cervids to Humans 2005 - December 14, 2012
Friday, December 14, 2012
IOWA Second Deer Positive for CWD at Davis County Hunting Preserve Captive Shooting Pen
Wednesday, January 02, 2013
Iowa Third Deer Positive CWD at Davis County Hunting Preserve Captive Shooting Pen
layperson
TSS
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