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CWD NEBRASKA NGPC 26 DEER CARCASSES TESTED POSITIVE BUFFALO, CUSTER AND HOLT COUNTIES DURING NOVEMBER HUNT

Posted Jan 04 2012 10:44am
CWD Found in Buffalo, Custer, Holt Counties



January 3, 2012



LINCOLN, Neb. – Chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer has appeared for the first time in Buffalo, Custer and Holt counties, according to the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission.


There were 1,565 lymph node samples collected from deer taken during the 2011 November firearm deer season, with 26 samples testing positive for CWD. In addition, samples were taken from 37 culled deer that showed clinical symptoms for CWD, with one male mule deer from Garden County testing positive. Those symptoms include a rough, emaciated appearance and a lack of fear of humans.


There were a record 51 positives from 3,645 samples in Nebraska in 2010. However, the surveillance effort was reduced in 2011 due to a lack of funds. The 2011 effort focused on central Nebraska, the leading edge of the disease as it spreads from west to east.


Game and Parks confirmed CWD in the state’s deer population in 2000. CWD is a disease that can affect deer and elk and always is fatal to the affected animal. Humans have never been known to contract CWD.









Chronic wasting disease found in deer killed in central Nebraska, game officials say




LINCOLN, Neb. — The Nebraska Game and Parks Commission says chronic wasting disease has been found in three central Nebraska counties for the first time.


The commission says a total of 26 deer carcasses tested positive for the disease in Buffalo, Custer and Holt counties during the November firearm hunting season. Nearly 1,600 lymph node samples were taken. One mule deer carcass in Garden County tested positive.


In 2010, 51 positives were found in the more than 3,600 test samples.


The 2011 testing was curtailed by budget issues, so it was concentrated on central Nebraska, which the commission says is the leading edge of the disease as it spreads from west to east.


The disease affects deer and elk and is always fatal. No human cases have ever been recorded.










Nebraska Chronic Wasting Disease













CWD IN NEBRASKA IS INCREASING WITH 51 POSITIVE CASES IN 2010 Posted Mar 02 2011 9:31pm Fifty-One Deer Test Positive for CWD


March 1, 2011 News


LINCOLN, Neb. – Nebraska is experiencing an increase in the number of deer testing positive for chronic wasting disease (CWD), as well as a wider distribution, according to the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission. There were a record 51 positives in 2010.


CWD is a disease that can affect deer and elk and is always fatal to the affected animal. Humans have never been known to contract CWD.


There were 3,645 lymph node samples collected from deer harvested during the November firearm season. The 51 positives were the most in Nebraska in one year.


The counties with the highest number of positives were: Sioux, 11; Sheridan, 7; Dawes, 6; Garden, 6; Box Butte, 4; Scotts Bluff, 4; and Morrill, 3. There were two positives each in Banner and Hitchcock counties and one each in Hooker, Keith, Lincoln, Loup, Cherry, and Hall counties. The counties in which CWD was found for the first time are: Hitchcock, Hooker, Lincoln, and Loup.


No elk tested positive for CWD in 2010.






Can Humans Be Infected with CWD? There is currently no scientific evidence that CWD has or can spread to humans, either through contact with infected animals or by eating the meat of infected animals. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has conducted an exhaustive study of CWD and human risk and has stated: "The risk of infection with the CWD agent among hunters is extremely small, if it exists at all." However, as we are still learning about this disease, the Commission recommends that hunters take precautions to limit risks. First and foremost, do not harvest any animal that appears sick or is acting strange.


Note the animal's location and contact the Commission. Avoid cutting or puncturing the spinal cords or brains of animals taken in the areas where CWD occurs. Do not use household utensils to field dress or process your deer. Wear rubber or latex gloves when handling any harvested animal.


Can the Disease Spread to Other Animals, Such As Cattle? Again, there is no indication or scientific evidence that the disease can spread to species other than deer or elk, but research in this area continues. Studies have shown that cattle placed in close and confined proximity with infected deer and elk have not developed the disease after living with them for over seven years.











Wednesday, March 02, 2011


CWD IN NEBRASKA IS INCREASING WITH 51 POSITIVE CASES IN 2010









Wednesday, February 04, 2009


Nebraska reports 22 cases of CWD in deer







Tuesday, December 18, 2007


NEBRASKA CWD tested 3,400 deer, with 17 testing positive 2007















CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD END OF YEAR REVIEW 2011




EFSA Journal 2011 The European Response to BSE: A Success Story



This is an interesting editorial about the Mad Cow Disease debacle, and it's ramifications that will continue to play out for decades to come ;
Monday, October 10, 2011
EFSA Journal 2011 The European Response to BSE: A Success Story
snip...
EFSA and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) recently delivered a scientific opinion on any possible epidemiological or molecular association between TSEs in animals and humans (EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ) and ECDC, 2011). This opinion confirmed Classical BSE prions as the only TSE agents demonstrated to be zoonotic so far but the possibility that a small proportion of human cases so far classified as "sporadic" CJD are of zoonotic origin could not be excluded. Moreover, transmission experiments to non-human primates suggest that some TSE agents in addition to Classical BSE prions in cattle (namely L-type Atypical BSE, Classical BSE in sheep, transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) and chronic wasting disease (CWD) agents) might have zoonotic potential.
snip...
see follow-up here about North America BSE Mad Cow TSE prion risk factors, and the ever emerging strains of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy in many species here in the USA, including humans ;
Thursday, December 29, 2011
Aerosols An underestimated vehicle for transmission of prion diseases?
PRION www.landesbioscience.com

please see more on Aerosols and TSE prion disease here ;
Saturday, December 31, 2011
Depopulation Plan Being Developed for Captive Deer Facility in Macon County after second CWD positive confirmation
please see this game farm that was shut down, and the incredible infection rate ;
Tuesday, December 20, 2011
CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD WISCONSIN Almond Deer (Buckhorn Flats) Farm Update DECEMBER 2011
Wednesday, December 21, 2011
CWD UTAH San Juan deer hunting unit
Monday, November 14, 2011
WYOMING Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease, CWD, TSE, PRION REPORTING 2011
Wednesday, November 16, 2011
Wisconsin Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease, CWD, TSE, PRION REPORTING 2011
Sunday, November 13, 2011
COLORADO CWD CJD TSE PRION REPORTING 2011
Monday, June 27, 2011
Zoonotic Potential of CWD: Experimental Transmissions to Non-Human Primates
Friday, December 23, 2011
Oral Transmission of L-type Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy in Primate Model
Volume 18, Number 1—January 2012 Dispatch
Saturday, December 3, 2011
Isolation of Prion with BSE Properties from Farmed Goat
Volume 17, Number 12—December 2011
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