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Cleveland County NC Deaths linked to rare TSE PRION brain disease ?

Posted Feb 14 2013 10:55am
Greetings TSE family,




more BSe $$$




God, if they only knew.




please see as follows ;




Deaths linked to rare brain disease?




Two possible cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease were identified in Cleveland County that possibly claimed the lives of two individuals in Dec. 2012 and January of this year. CJD comes in various forms and could have a relation to mad cow disease which has never been identified or found in the county or the state. CJD can be contracted through genetics, sporadically or through contact with contaminated human tissues.




By Alicia Banks




Published: Wednesday, February 13, 2013 at 18:49 PM.




Alicia Banks











A type of rare, degenerative brain disease - not unlike mad cow disease - may have claimed the lives of two county residents within the span of two months, according to local health officials.




Deaths of two people - one in January of this year and another in December 2012 - were labeled “probable cases” of Creutzfeldt-Jakob’s disease (CJD), according to Kim Crane, communicable disease and prevention supervisor for the Cleveland County Health Department.




Diseases like CJD are marked by abnormal proteins called prions that can develop in the brains of both humans and animals, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.




About 350 deaths related to CJD were reported in the U.S. during 2009, according to the CDC’s website.




Thirteen CJD-related deaths were reported by the NC Department of Health and Human Services in 2010, the most recent year in which stats for disease cases were available. None of the cases reported were related to mad cow disease.




Crane said she wasn't allowed to release any additional information about the individuals involved in both cases, such as age, gender, residency in the county and additional medical information.




Varying forms of the disease




CJD comes in many forms, but two are most prominent: variant and classic.




Variant, or vCJD, has been linked to outbreaks of people eating infected beef from animals with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also known as “mad cow disease.” Cases of variant CJD and BSE appeared almost simultaneously in the United Kingdom during the early 1990s, according to the Mayo Clinic’s website.




In 1996, three cases of CJD were identified in the US, but they were contracted in the United Kingdom and Saudi Arabia, according to Marilyn Haskell, a public health veterinarian and epidemiologist with the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services.




Classic CJD occurs spontaneously in humans from abnormal brain prions. It is not related to mad cow disease, Haskell said.




Classic CJD usually develops later in life around age 60, the CDC reports, while the average age of people contacting CJD linked to mad cow disease is about 28 years old.




“Having a probable case does not mean the person had CJD,” Haskell said.




No other probable or confirmed cases of CJD were reported on record in the county, Crane said.




Confirming presence of the disease




Generally, CJD carries symptoms similar to other brain disorders such as advanced Alzheimer’s, including dementia, memory loss, difficulty speaking and personality changes.




A person can have classic CJD for years before symptoms surface, and most classic forms are fatal.




CJD can only be confirmed by a human brain autopsy or biopsy after death, according to health officials.




An autopsy wasn’t performed on either of the two probable cases in Cleveland County, Crane said.




Autopsies to confirm CJD in North Carolina have to be arranged by the hospital handling the case, Haskell said.




There is no known prevention or cure for classic CJD.




The disease can also be inherited through genetics or contaminated brain tissue. Passing contaminated tissues can occur in medical procedures, including cornea, skin transplants and even surgeries with contaminated instruments, the Mayo Clinic reports.




The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke says forms of CJD can’t be passed on through the air or by touching.




Reach reporter Alicia Banks at 704-669-3338, email abanks@shelbystar.com and follow on Twitter @TheStarAlicia.




What is Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease?




A rare, degenerative fatal brain disorder that affects one person in every 1 million people per year worldwide. About 200 cases are reported in the US each year.




Symptoms of CJD




Signs of CJD can sometimes mirror Alzheimer’s Disease, including:




-Failing memory




-Behavioral changes




-Lack of coordination




-Behavioral changes




-Blindness




-Coma may occur




Most individuals with CJD die within one year after symptoms surface






What are the different forms of CJD?




- Classic or sporadic : the disease appears even though the person has no known risk factors for the disease. This accounts for 85 percent of cases.




- Hereditary : Marked by a family history of the disease that can be tested for a genetic mutation associated with CJD.




- Variant : Linked to people eating infected beef with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) found in cows, also known as “mad cow disease.”




- CJD can also be transmitted through contact with contaminated brain tissue from surgeries or medical procedures




How many cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease were reported in N.C.




Since 2011, 13 cases of confirmed, suspected or probable types of CJD cases were reported in the state.




*Note: No cases of variant CJD, suspected to be related to mad cow disease, have ever been reported or identified in North Carolina.




*Source: The National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services






How can you get help?




Contact the Cleveland County Health Department at 704-484-5100 for any questions about CJD or if you're experiencing any of the above symptoms. Also contact your local healthcare provider.














1 in a million ??





or really, what officials don’t publish, 1 in 9,000 CJD cases per year in the population group age 55 and older.





big difference...






>>> A type of rare, degenerative brain disease - not unlike mad cow disease - may have claimed the lives of two county residents within the span of two months, according to local health officials.





POPULATION CLEVELAND COUNTY N.C. 97,489 - Jul 2011






o.k., someone explain to me how you can have a sporadic FFI, but with no family genetic connection, and it still be a familial type prion disease, yet be similar to the atypical h-g-BSE in the USA, but no human TSE there from in USA?


sporadic cjd, sporadic ffi, sporadic gss, now VPSPr?, all these human TSE are simply a human TSE prion disease of _unknown_ route and source, and officials have no clue if they are zoonosis or not.


consumption, medical, surgical, dental, friendly fire from sub-clinical TSE consumption, to iCJD in someone else ??


all iatrogenic CJD is, is sporadic CJD until route and source of the TSE prion agent is confirmed, and this is not done very often.


and remember, iCJD, is friendly fire from another person, i.e. the pass it forward mode of mad cow disease.


NOW, there is evidence that some sporadic CJD is linked to the atypical BSE and atypical Scrapie.


the UKBSEnvCJD only theory should be put to bed once and for all.


the USA and North America have more _documented_ TSE prion disease in the wild and livestock and different species (other than zoo animals, canine and feline TSE prion history), than any other country in the world, or continent.


consumption, sub-clinical there from, and from that, what about second hand transmission via medical surgical, iatrogenic routes ??


I don’t buy the star trek like cloaking device for humans, the usda cdc fda et al claim we have from the many different strains of mad cow disease, mad sheep and goat disease, and mad deer and elk disease in the USA. ..tss







Saturday, December 29, 2012



MAD COW USA HUMAN TSE PRION DISEASE DECEMBER 29 2012 CJD CASE LAB REPORT










Monday, December 31, 2012



Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease and Human TSE Prion Disease in Washington State, 2006–2011-2012










16 YEAR OLD TSE MAD COW TYPE PRION DISEASE DEATH IN USA





Monday, January 14, 2013



Gambetti et al USA Prion Unit change another highly suspect USA mad cow victim to another fake name i.e. sporadic FFI at age 16 CJD Foundation goes along with this BSe










MAD COW USDA ATYPICAL L-TYPE BASE BSE, the rest of the story...










Tuesday, November 6, 2012



Transmission of New Bovine Prion to Mice, Atypical Scrapie, BSE, and Sporadic CJD, November-December 2012 update










Tuesday, June 26, 2012



Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease Human TSE report update North America, Canada, Mexico, and USDA PRION UNIT as of May 18, 2012



type determination pending Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease (tdpCJD), is on the rise in Canada and the USA










Saturday, March 5, 2011



MAD COW ATYPICAL CJD PRION TSE CASES WITH CLASSIFICATIONS PENDING ON THE RISE IN NORTH AMERICA










Sunday, February 12, 2012



National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center Cases Examined1 (August 19, 2011) including Texas










Monday, August 9, 2010



Variably protease-sensitive prionopathy: A new sporadic disease of the prion protein or just more Prionbaloney ?










Wednesday, March 28, 2012



VARIABLY PROTEASE-SENSITVE PRIONOPATHY IS TRANSMISSIBLE ...price of prion poker goes up again $



OR-10 15:25 - 15:40 VARIABLY PROTEASE-SENSITIVE PRIONOPATHY IS TRANSMISSIBLE IN BANK VOLES Nonno










Sunday, August 09, 2009



CJD...Straight talk with...James Ironside...and...Terry Singeltary... 2009










Tuesday, August 18, 2009



BSE-The Untold Story - joe gibbs and singeltary 1999 – 2009










Sunday, February 10, 2013



Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) biannual update (February 2013) Infection report/CJD










Monday, October 10, 2011



EFSA Journal 2011 The European Response to BSE: A Success Story



snip...



EFSA and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) recently delivered a scientific opinion on any possible epidemiological or molecular association between TSEs in animals and humans (EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ) and ECDC, 2011). This opinion confirmed Classical BSE prions as the only TSE agents demonstrated to be zoonotic so far but the possibility that a small proportion of human cases so far classified as "sporadic" CJD are of zoonotic origin could not be excluded. Moreover, transmission experiments to non-human primates suggest that some TSE agents in addition to Classical BSE prions in cattle (namely L-type Atypical BSE, Classical BSE in sheep, transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) and chronic wasting disease (CWD) agents) might have zoonotic potential.



snip...











see follow-up here about North America BSE Mad Cow TSE prion risk factors, and the ever emerging strains of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy in many species here in the USA, including humans ;








Thursday, August 12, 2010



Seven main threats for the future linked to prions



First threat



The TSE road map defining the evolution of European policy for protection against prion diseases is based on a certain numbers of hypotheses some of which may turn out to be erroneous. In particular, a form of BSE (called atypical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy), recently identified by systematic testing in aged cattle without clinical signs, may be the origin of classical BSE and thus potentially constitute a reservoir, which may be impossible to eradicate if a sporadic origin is confirmed.



***Also, a link is suspected between atypical BSE and some apparently sporadic cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. These atypical BSE cases constitute an unforeseen first threat that could sharply modify the European approach to prion diseases.



Second threat



snip...










Saturday, June 25, 2011



Transmissibility of BSE-L and Cattle-Adapted TME Prion Strain to Cynomolgus Macaque



"BSE-L in North America may have existed for decades"








Over the next 8-10 weeks, approximately 40% of all the adult mink on the farm died from TME.



snip...



The rancher was a ''dead stock'' feeder using mostly (>95%) downer or dead dairy cattle...










Monday, September 26, 2011



L-BSE BASE prion and atypical sporadic CJD










Wednesday, March 28, 2012


VARIABLY PROTEASE-SENSITVE PRIONOPATHY IS TRANSMISSIBLE, price of prion poker goes up again $









*** The discovery of previously unrecognized prion diseases in both humans and animals (i.e., Nor98 in small ruminants) demonstrates that the range of prion diseases might be wider than expected and raises crucial questions about the epidemiology and strain properties of these new forms. We are investigating this latter issue by molecular and biological comparison of VPSPr, GSS and Nor98.





AS OF AUGUST 2012 ;




CJD UPDATE USA




1 Listed based on the year of death or, if not available, on year of referral;


2 Cases with suspected prion disease for which brain tissue and/or blood (in familial cases) were submitted;


3 Disease acquired in the United Kingdom;


4 Disease was acquired in the United Kingdom in one case and in Saudi Arabia in the other case;



*** 5 Includes 8 cases in which the diagnosis is pending, and 18 inconclusive cases;



*** 6 Includes 10 (9 from 2012) cases with type determination pending in which the diagnosis of vCJD has been excluded.



*** The Sporadic cases include 16 cases of sporadic Fatal Insomnia (sFI) and 42 cases of Variably Protease-Sensitive Prionopathy (VPSPr) and 2224 cases of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD).












Tuesday, November 6, 2012


Transmission of New Bovine Prion to Mice, Atypical Scrapie, BSE, and Sporadic CJD, November-December 2012 update










Terry S. Singeltary Sr. on the Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Public Health Crisis













full text with source references ;










Sunday, August 21, 2011



The British disease, or a disease gone global, The TSE Prion Disease (SEE VIDEO)










U.S.A. HIDING MAD COW DISEASE VICTIMS AS SPORADIC CJD ? (see video at bottom)










Wednesday, April 25, 2012



USA MAD COW DISEASE AND CJD THERE FROM SINGELTARY ET AL 1999 – 2012










Tuesday, July 29, 2008



Heidenhain Variant Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease Case Report



FINAL AUTOPSY DIAGNOSIS



I. Brain: Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Heidenhain variant.



SKROLL down a bit for Mom's autopsy of hvCJD. ...










Monday, February 11, 2013



APHIS USDA Letter to Stakeholders: Trade Accomplishments and failures (BSE, SCRAPIE, TSE, PRION, AKA MAD COW TYPE DISEASE)










Wednesday, May 16, 2012



Alzheimer’s disease and Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy prion disease, Iatrogenic, what if ?



Proposal ID: 29403










PLEASE REMEMBER ;






The Akron, Ohio-based CJD Foundation said the Center for Disease Control revised that number in October of 2004 to about one in 9,000 CJD cases per year in the population group age 55 and older. HAVE YOU GOT YOUR CJD QUESTIONNAIRE ASKING REAL QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO ROUTE AND SOURCE OF THE TSE AGENT THAT KILLED YOUR LOVED ONE ??





if not, why not...






Friday, November 30, 2007



CJD QUESTIONNAIRE USA CWRU AND CJD FOUNDATION













layperson


Terry S. Singeltary Sr.






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