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Chronic wasting disease found in Missouri deer

Posted Feb 26 2010 7:59am
February 25, 2010

Chronic Wasting Disease Found in Captive Deer


The Missouri Departments of Agriculture, Conservation and Health and Senior Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced today that a captive white-tailed deer in Linn County, Missouri has tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). CWD is a neurological disease found in deer, elk and moose.

"There is no evidence that CWD poses a risk to domestic animals or humans," said State Veterinarian Dr. Taylor Woods. "We have protocols in place to quickly and effectively handle these situations."

The animal that tested positive for CWD was a white-tailed deer inspected as part of the State's CWD surveillance and testing program. Preliminary tests were conducted by the USDA National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa.

Upon receiving the confirmed CWD positive, Missouri's departments of Agriculture, Conservation and Health and Senior Services initiated their CWD Contingency Plan. The plan was developed in 2002 by the Cervid Health Committee, a task force comprised of veterinarians, animal health officers and conservation officers from USDA, MDA, MDC and DHSS working together to mitigate challenges associated with CWD.

CWD is transmitted by live animal to animal contact or soil to animal contact. The disease was first recognized in 1967 in captive mule deer in the Colorado Division of Wildlife captive wildlife research facility in Fort Collins, Colorado. CWD has been documented in deer and/or elk in Colorado, Illinois, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and the Canadian Provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. There has been no evidence that the disease can be transmitted to humans.

"Missouri's proactive steps to put a testing protocol in place and create a contingency plan years ago is proving beneficial. We are in a solid position to follow pre-established steps to ensure Missouri's valuable whitetail deer resource remains healthy and strong," said Jason Sumners Missouri's Deer Biologist.

For more information regarding CWD, please contact Dr. Taylor Woods at (573) 751-3377.


http://mda.mo.gov/news/2010/Chronic_Wasting_Disease_Found_in_Captive_Deer



Chronic wasting disease found in Missouri deer


Thursday, February 25, 2010 6:52 p.m. CST BY The Associated Press JEFFERSON CITY — State officials have said a captive white-tail deer in northern Linn County has tested positive for chronic wasting disease.

The disease is transmitted from animal to animal or from soil to animal, and there is no risk to domestic animals or humans, the state veterinarian said Thursday.

Chronic wasting disease is a neurological disease found in deer, elk and moose. It has been documented in 15 states and two Canadian provinces.

The farm-raised deer in Linn County had been inspected as part of Missouri's chronic wasting disease surveillance and testing program. A representative from the agriculture department said the state immediately initiated a contingency plan to limit spread of the disease among the deer population.

The state-issued news release
JEFFERSON CITY — The Missouri Departments of Agriculture, Conservation and Health and Senior Services, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced today that a captive white-tailed deer in Linn County, Missouri has tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease. CWD is a neurological disease found in deer, elk and moose.

“There is no evidence that CWD poses a risk to domestic animals or humans,” said State Veterinarian Dr. Taylor Woods. “We have protocols in place to quickly and effectively handle these situations.”

The animal that tested positive for CWD was a white-tailed deer inspected as part of the State’s CWD surveillance and testing program. Preliminary tests were conducted by the USDA National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa.

Upon receiving the confirmed CWD positive, Missouri’s departments of Agriculture, Conservation and Health and Senior Services initiated their CWD Contingency Plan. The plan was developed in 2002 by the Cervid Health Committee, a task force comprised of veterinarians, animal health officers and conservation officers from USDA, MDA, MDC and DHSS working together to mitigate challenges associated with CWD.

CWD is transmitted by live animal to animal contact or soil to animal contact. The disease was first recognized in 1967 in captive mule deer in the Colorado Division of Wildlife captive wildlife research facility in Fort Collins, Colorado. CWD has been documented in deer and/or elk in Colorado, Illinois, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and the Canadian Provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. There has been no evidence that the disease can be transmitted to humans.

“Missouri’s proactive steps to put a testing protocol in place and create a contingency plan years ago is proving beneficial. We are in a solid position to follow pre-established steps to ensure Missouri’s valuable whitetail deer resource remains healthy and strong,” said Jason Sumners Missouri’s Deer Biologist.


http://www.columbiamissourian.com/stories/2010/02/25/chronic-wasting-disease-found-mo-deer/





Missouri Conservationist

VOLUME 71, ISSUE 2, FEBRUARY 2010

• Keeping Missouri's deer herd free from chron­ic wasting disease continues to be a high prior­ity. In the past, the Conservation Department monitored CWD in captive deer herds. Now the Missouri Department of Agriculture will be in charge of the herds, which are not part of Missouri's wild deer population. The Conservation Department will continue to test for CWD in wild deer and work with the Department of Agriculture if CWD is detected.

• Hunters who travel from another state and are transporting harvested deer, moose or elk with the spinal column or head attached must report the carcasses' entry into Missouri to the Conservation Department within 24 hours of entering the state, and the carcass must be tak­en to a licensed meat processor or taxidermist within 72 hours of entry. Meat processors and taxidermists must dispose of the spinal cord and other parts in a properly permitted landfill.

Hunters do not need to contact the Department if they are bringing back cut and wrapped meat that has been boned out, quarters and other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached; hides or capes from which all excess tissue has been removed; antlers; antlers attached to skull plates or skulls cleaned of all muscle and brain tissue; upper canine teeth; and finished taxidermy products.

To see all the regulations on a specific conservation area and to find out what is available to do, go to www.MissouriConservation.org/2930. You can search by county, area name or region.

• Two changes have been made to the Wildlife Collector's Permit, which allow researchers to take species from the wild to study. To help keep diseases from spreading, wildlife held in captivity away from the area they were taken are not to be returned to the wild unless ap­proved ahead of time. Also, helpers who do not have their own permit must be under the direct, in-person supervision of the permit holder at all times.

http://mdc.mo.gov/documents/conmag/2010/20100201.pdf




Chronic Wasting Disease and Cervidae Regulations in North America MI Department of Natural Resources Contact: Melinda Cosgrove (cosgrovm@michigan.gov 517-336-5043) January 2010

State/Province

Missouri

Agency (with jurisdiction over captive cervids) and Contacts

Dept. of Agriculture regulates elk meeting the "livestock" definition (Contact Person for Dept. of Agriculture is Dr. Taylor Woods, DVM - Missouri State Veterinarian (573) 751-3377). Department of Conservation regulates free-ranging elk, mule deer, and white-tailed and captive cervids in hunting preserves and breeding facilities. Contact Dean Harre, dean.harre@mdc.mo.gov (573) 751-4115 ext. 3258. Missouri has a State CWD Task Force co-chaired by the Departments of Agriculture and Conservation. Participants include a broad array of stakeholders including the captive cervid industry, meat processors and conservation organizations. Change to occur - March 1, 2010 the Missouri Department of Agriculture will assume the role of regulating all herds (elk, mule deer, and white-tailed deer) that are enrolled in the State's CWD monitoring program.

Standard Regulations * (listed only if different or in addition to those listed below)

See CWD Regulations

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Regulations for Captive Cervids and Wildlife

1.) Captive cervids will not be allowed to enter the state if within the last five years the animal: (A) is from an area that has been reported as a CWD endemic area; (B) has been in a CWD endemic area; (C) originates from a CWD positive herd.; 2.) All elk, elk-hybrids, red deer, sika deer, white-tailed deer, and mule deer entering Missouri from any state must have participated in a surveillance program for five consecutive years before the above mentioned animals will be allowed to enter Missouri from any state. ; 3.) Other captive cervids other than elk, elk-hybrids, red deer, sika deer, white-tailed deer and mule deer must have participated in a surveillance program recognized by the state of origin prior to entering Missouri. ; 4.) One hundred percent (100%) of all elk, elk hybrids, mule deer and whitetail deer over 12 months of age that die of any cause in a breeder operation shall be tested for CWD at a federally approved laboratory, up to an annual total of ten (10) animals in the aggregate. 5.) Except all captive white-tailed deer that enter Missouri, (imports) and remain in Missouri at the time of death, must be tested for CWD. 6.) Animals must meet all

In Process of Developing or Implementing New or Additional CWD Regulations

See CWD Regulations. Change to occur - March 1, 2010 all CWD related regulations will be completely removed from the Wildlife Code of Missouri. The Missouri Department of Agriculture will assume the role of regulating and enforcing all CWD related regulations. The Wildlife Code of Missouir will specifically state: "Animal health standards and movement activities shall comply with all state and federal regulations. (Refer to Missouri Department of Agriculture for applicable Chronic Wasting Disease rules and regulations.)"

CWD Testing Program for Captive Cervids

Voluntary monitoring program developed and implemented in 2002 for captive industry. 1.) All captive whitetail deer that enter Missouri, (imports) and remain in Missouri at time of death, must be tested for CWD.

CWD Testing Program for Wildlife

Tested more than 22,000 free-ranging deer during 2002-2004 with a sample of at least 200 deer per county. No CWD was found. The Department of Conservation continues to test sick deer and encourages hunters and the public to report deer than appear to be ill. Targeted surveillance of obviously sick animals will continue indefinitely. In 2007, the Department began a three-year program of CWD testing in which one-third of the state was sampled annually. In 2007 1,221 CWD samples were collected from adult bucks by trained taxidermist and an additional 9 sick deer tested in the northern third of the state and in 2008, 1,194 samples of adult bucks were collected and tested in the central third of the state. No CWD was found.

Baiting Banned

Hunting deer, turkey and waterfowl over bait has been prohibited for many years in Missouri.

Feeding Banned

No Ban.

Ban on Movement of Animal Parts

No ban, encourage hunters to import only boned out meat and clean skull plates. We employ media releases to inform hunters of regulations in other states Missouri residents commonly hunt. Change to occur - March 1, 2010 the following verbiage is being added to the Wildlife Code of Missouri "Wildlife legally taken and exported from another state or country may also be shipped into Missouri by common carrier, except cervid carcasses or cervid carcass parts. The importation, transportation, or possession of cervid carcasses or cervid carcass parts taken from or obtained outside of Missouri is prohibited, except for meat that is cut and wrapped; meat that has been boned out; quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached; hides or capes from which all excess tissue has been removed; antlers; antlers attached to skull plates or skulls cleaned of all muscle and brain tissue; upper canine teeth; and finished taxidermy products. Carcasses or parts of carcasses with the spinal column or head attached my be transported into the state only if they are reported to an agent of the department within twenty-four (24) hours of entering the state and then taken to a license meat processor or taxidermist within seventy-two (72) hours of entry. Licensed meat processors and taxidermists shall dispose of the discarded tissue in a properly permitted landfill.

CWD Found in Captive Cervids

No

UPDATE

(yes, February 25, 2010 Chronic Wasting Disease Found in Captive Deer The Missouri Departments of Agriculture, Conservation and Health and Senior Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced today that a captive white-tailed deer in Linn County, Missouri has tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD).)

http://mda.mo.gov/news/2010/Chronic_Wasting_Disease_Found_in_Captive_Deer



CWD Found in Free- Ranging Cervids

No

http://www.cwd-info.org/pdf/CWDRegstableState.pdf




Chronic Waste Disease—Missouri continues to monitor the captive cervid herds resulting in 628 tested in 2009. In March 2010, the Missouri Department of Conservation will relinquish CWD monitoring of whitetail to the Department of Agriculture.

http://mda.mo.gov/YearlyReview2009.pdf



12/31/2009

(E) Chronic Wasting Disease. 1. Captive cervids will not be allowed to enter the state if, within the last five (5) years, the animal— A. Originates from an area or has been in an area that has been reported as a Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) endemic area; and B. Originates from a CWD positive captive herd. 2. Elk, elk-hybrids, red deer, roe deer, white-tailed deer, mule deer, sika deer, and moose entering Missouri from any state must have participated in a CWD certification program for five (5) consecutive years. Other cervids, including but not limited to reindeer, mutjac, and fallow deer, must have participated in a certification program recognized by the state of origin prior to entering Missouri. Original anniversary date must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. 3. Captive cervids moving between publicly- owned American Zoos and Aquariums (AZA)-accredited zoos must meet the CWD certification program requirements.

http://www.sos.mo.gov/adrules/csr/current/2csr/2c30-2.pdf




Rules of Department of Agriculture Division 30?Animal Health Chapter 2?Health Requirements for Movement of Livestock, Poultry and Exotic Animals

(6/30/06)

(D) Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). 1. Captive cervids will not be allowed to enter the state if within the last five (5) years the animal: A. Is from an area that has been reported as a chronic wasting disease (CWD) endemic area; B. Has been in a CWD endemic area; or C. Originates from a CWD positive captive herd. 2. Until 2008, elk, elk-hybrids, red deer, sika deer, white-tailed deer, and mule deer entering Missouri from any state must have participated in a surveillance program since 2002. Beginning in 2008, surveillance will be required for five (5) consecutive years before the above-mentioned animals will be allowed to enter Missouri from any state. 3. Other captive cervids other than elk, elk-hybrids, red deer, sika deer, white-tailed deer and mule deer must have participated in a surveillance program recognized by the state of origin prior to entering Missouri. 4. All captive white-tailed deer that enter Missouri with two (2) years of CWD monitoring in an approved surveillance program and remained in Missouri at the time of death, must be tested for CWD.

https://www.sos.mo.gov/adrules/csr/previous/2csr/2csr0808/2c30-2.pdf




2005

(D) Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). 1. Captive cervids will not be allowed to enter the state if within the last five (5) years the animal: A. Is from an area that has been reported as a chronic wasting disease (CWD) endemic area; B. Has been in a CWD endemic area; or C. Originates from a CWD positive captive herd. 2. Until 2008, elk, elk-hybrids, red deer, sika deer, white-tailed deer, and mule deer entering Missouri from any state must have participated in a surveillance program since 2002. Beginning in 2008, surveillance will be required for five (5) consecutive years before the above-mentioned animals will be allowed to enter Missouri from any state. 3. Other captive cervids other than elk, elk-hybrids, red deer, sika deer, white-tailed deer and mule deer must have participated in a surveillance program recognized by the state of origin prior to entering Missouri. 4. All captive white-tailed deer that enter Missouri with two (2) years of CWD monitoring in an approved surveillance program and remained in Missouri at the time of death, must be tested for CWD.

https://www.sos.mo.gov/adrules/csr/previous/2csr/2csr0206/2c30-2.pdf





Title 2—DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Division 30—Animal Health

Chapter 2—Health Requirements for Movement of Livestock, Poultry and Exotic Animals

EMERGENCY AMENDMENT

2 CSR 30-2.010 Health Requirements Governing the Admission of Livestock, Poultry and Exotic Animals Entering Missouri. The division is amending subsection (13)(D).

PURPOSE: This emergency amendment addresses the financial crisis affecting Missouri white-tail deer farmers due to the importation restriction implemented during the first years of chronic wasting disease (CWD) control and eradication efforts throughout the nation by reducing the required level of surveillance for CWD in order for white-tail deer to enter Missouri.

EMERGENCY STATEMENT: There is a compelling governmental interest in preserving the white-tail deer industry which has been seriously affected by a 2002 rule change. This emergency amendment will provide significant regulatory and financial relief for captive white-tail deer producers and big game hunting preserve operators. The emergency passage of this amendment will allow millions of dollars to be injected into the state’s economy this year, help maintain employment in the white-tail deer industry and could save Missouri white-tail deer operations from being forced out of business. The Missouri Department of Agriculture (MDA) values and supports a prosperous agricultural economy and supports and promotes the preservation and enhancement of our environment and agricultural resources. The Missouri Department of Agriculture supports and promotes the safe, profitable and environmentally responsible operation of white-tail deer agricultural endeavors.

In order to protect Missouri livestock and existing herds of elk, elkhybrids, white-tailed deer and mule deer from importation of diseases that pose a potential threat to the public health, safety and welfare, the Department of Agriculture proposed a rule change in 2002 to limit and monitor the movement of captive cervids into the state. The proposed change, dealing with the diseases of brucellosis, tuberculosis and chronic wasting disease (CWD), was adopted. The amended rule requires captive cervids entering Missouri to have an interstate shipping permit issued by the state veterinarian’s office and a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. The rule stipulates testing requirements for the movement of captive cervids into the state. The rule also states that cervids “from all states must have participated in a surveillance program for at least three (3) years prior to entering Missouri.”

Although the department has received little or no negative feedback regarding the cost associated with testing the animals, an unintended consequence of the rule change has negatively impacted the profitability of the industry. Very few herds in the United States have been in a surveillance program for three (3) years or longer and ironically those herds that have are in states that have been reported to have chronic wasting disease endemic areas. With the three (3) year surveillance requirement in place farmers engaged in big game hunting operations have little or no opportunity to import large trophy deer for their hunting preserves and breeders have difficulty importing ideal breeding stock. The inability to import the very best stock has cost the industry more than three (3) million dollars in lost hunt sales alone. Since more than ninety percent (90%) of the white-taildeer hunters at Missouri’s big game preserves are from out-of-state there has been a substantial revenue loss to Missouri’s tourism industry as well. The local economies in areas surrounding breeding farms and hunting preserves have also seen revenues decline and some of the operations have been forced to lay off employees. If the rule is not changed in time for the preserves to benefit from this years hunting season not only will there be a significant loss in revenue to the industry and the Missouri economy, it is feared that more operators will be forced out of the business.

Prior to the implementation of the rule change more than two thousand (2,000) white-tail deer were annually exported to other states with sales totaling more than three (3) million dollars. Since the 2002 three (3) year surveillance requirement was enacted, sales of whitetail deer at Missouri livestock markets have dropped by more than ninety percent (90%) and the top selling price for a buck has plummeted from eleven thousand dollars ($11,000) to one thousand dollars ($1,000) in the same period. This once thriving segment of the industry is now all but nonexistent. Since the rule was amended the total economic impact in lost revenue in Missouri has been estimated to be more than ten (10) million dollars annually. Although this amount may seem small compared to Missouri’s total economy it is a substantial amount for one (1) small segment of Missouri agriculture. In the two (2) years since the rule change, extensive testing and epidemiologic studies have been conducted nationwide. The results have revealed no new infected herds outside the original eleven (11) states where the disease had been previously diagnosed. While the rule change lowers the required number of years for CWD surveillance from a three (3)-year to two (2)-year status it further requires that all captive white-tail deer entering Missouri with a two (2)-year status be tested for CWD upon the death of the animal regardless of the cause of death. MDA and its Animal Health Division are satisfied that the emergency rule change will continue to protect the public health, safety and welfare as well as Missouri livestock and cervids through surveillance and testing, while providing needed and immediate financial relief for the white-tail deer industry. The Missouri Department of Agriculture strongly supports the emergency status of this rule change.

A proposed amendment, which covers the same material, is published in this issue of the Missouri Register. The scope of this emergency amendment is limited to the circumstances creating the emergency and complies with the protections extended in the Missouri and United States Constitutions. The Department of Agriculture believes this emergency amendment is fair to all interested persons and parties under the circumstances. Emergency amendment filed August 23, 2004, effective September 3, 2004, expires March 1, 2004.

(13) Miscellaneous and Exotic Animals. All exotic animals must be accompanied by an official Certificate of Veterinary Inspection showing an individual listing of the common and scientific name(s) of the animal(s) and appropriate descriptions of animal(s) such as sex, age, weight, coloration and the permanent tag number, brand or tattoo identification.

(D) Captive cervids, prior to entering Missouri, must have an entry permit issued by the state veterinarian’s office and a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. Captive cervids that enter Missouri must be in compliance with the guidelines as incorporated by reference to the Bovine Tuberculosis Eradication Uniform Methods and Rules, Effective January 22, 1999 and Brucellosis in Cervidae: Uniform Methods and Rules, Effective September 30, 1998.

1. All sexually intact animals six (6) months of age or older, not under quarantine and not affected with brucellosis, must test negative for brucellosis within thirty (30) days prior to movement, except
A. Brucellosis-free herd—captive cervids originating from certified brucellosis-free herds may enter on herd status without additional testing provided the certified herd number and current test date is shown on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection;

B. Brucellosis-monitored herd—all sexually intact animals six (6) months of age or older must test negative for brucellosis within ninety (90) days prior to interstate movement.

2. Captive cervids not known to be affected with or exposed to tuberculosis and not in a status herd, as defined in the Bovine Tuberculosis Eradication Uniform Methods and Rules, Effective January 22, 1999, must have two (2) negative tuberculosis tests, not less than ninety (90) days apart, using the single cervical method. The second test must be within ninety (90) days prior to movement. Both negative test dates must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. Animals must have been isolated from other captive cervids during the testing period.

3. Movement from status herds.

A. Accredited herd—captive cervids originating from accredited tuberculosis-free cervid herd as defined by the Bovine Tuberculosis Eradication Uniform Methods and Rules, Effective January 22, 1999, may enter on herd status without additional testing provided the accredited herd number and current test date is shown on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.

B. Qualified herd—captive cervids originating from a qualified herd as defined by the Bovine Tuberculosis Eradication Uniform Methods and Rules, Effective January 22, 1999, must have one (1) negative tuberculosis test, using the single cervical method, within ninety (90) days prior to the date of movement.

C. Monitored herd—captive cervids originating from a monitored herd as defined by the Bovine Tuberculosis Eradication Uniform Methods and Rules, Effective January, 22, 1999, must have one (1) negative tuberculosis test, using the single cervical method, within ninety (90) days prior to date of movement.

D. Captive cervids less than twelve (12) months of age that originate from and were born in qualified or monitored herds may be moved without further tuberculosis testing, provided that they are accompanied by a certificate stating that such captive cervids originated from such herds and have not been exposed to captive cervids from a lower status herd.

4. Captive cervids from an area that has been reported as a chronic wasting disease (CWD) endemic area or any cervid that has been in an endemic area in the last five (5) years will not be allowed to enter Missouri.

5. Elk, elk-hybrids, [white-tailed deer] and mule deer from all states must have participated in a surveillance program for at least three (3) years prior to entering Missouri. Other captive cervids other than white-tailed deer must have participated in a surveillance program recognized by the state of origin prior to entering Missouri.

6. White-tailed deer from all states must have participated in a surveillance program for at least two (2) years prior to entering Missouri. Other captive cervids must have participated in a surveillance program recognized by the state of origin prior to entering Missouri.

7. All captive white-tailed deer that enter Missouri with a two (2)-year status in a CWD surveillance program and remain in Missouri at the time of death must be tested for CWD.

AUTHORITY: section 267.645, RSMo 2000. This version of rule filed Jan. 24, 1975, effective Feb. 3, 1975. For intervening history, please consult the Code of State Regulations. Emergency amendment filed Aug. 23, 2004, effective Sept. 3, 2004, expires March 1, 2005. A proposed amendment covering this same material is published in this issue of the Missouri Register.

Title 2—DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Division 30—Animal Health

Chapter 6—Livestock Markets

EMERGENCY AMENDMENT

2 CSR 30-6.020 Duties and Facilities of the Market/Sale Veterinarian. The department is proposing to amend subsection (8)(D).

PURPOSE: This emergency amendment addresses the financial crisis affecting Missouri white-tail deer farmers due to the importation restriction implemented during the first years of chronic wasting disease (CWD) control and eradication efforts throughout the nation by reducing the required level of surveillance for CWD in order for white-tail deer to enter Missouri.

EMERGENCY STATEMENT: There is a compelling governmental interest in preserving the white-tail deer industry which has been seriously affected by a 2002 rule change. This emergency amendment will provide significant regulatory and financial relief for captive white-tail deer producers and big game hunting preserve operators. The emergency passage of this amendment will allow millions of dollars to be injected into the state’s economy this year, help maintain employment in the white-tail deer industry and could save Missouri white-tail deer operations from being forced out of business. The Missouri Department of Agriculture (MDA) values and supports a prosperous agricultural economy and supports and promotes the preservation and enhancement of our environment and agricultural resources. The Missouri Department of Agriculture supports and promotes the safe, profitable and environmentally responsible operation of white-tail deer agricultural endeavors. In order to protect Missouri livestock and existing herds of elk, elkhybrids, white-tailed deer and mule deer from importation of diseases that pose a potential threat to the public health, safety and welfare, the Department of Agriculture proposed a rule change in 2002 to limit and monitor the movement of captive cervids into the state. The proposed change, dealing with the diseases of brucellosis, tuberculosis and chronic wasting disease (CWD), was adopted. The amended rule requires captive cervids entering Missouri to have an interstate shipping permit issued by the state veterinarian’s office and a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. The rule stipulates testing requirements for the movement of captive cervids into the state. The rule also states that cervids “from all states must have participated in a surveillance program for at least three (3) years prior to entering Missouri.”

Although the department has received little or no negative feedback regarding the cost associated with testing the animals, an unintended consequence of the rule change has negatively impacted the profitability of the industry. Very few herds in the United States have been in a surveillance program for three (3) years or longer and ironically those herds that have are in states that have been reported to have chronic wasting disease endemic areas. With the three (3) year surveillance requirement in place farmers engaged in big game hunting operations have little or no opportunity to import large trophy deer for their hunting preserves and breeders have difficulty importing ideal breeding stock. The inability to import the very best stock has cost the industry more than three (3) million dollars in lost hunt sales alone. Since more than ninety percent (90%) of the white-tail deer hunters at Missouri’s big game preserves are from out-of-state there has been a substantial revenue loss to Missouri’s tourism industry as well. The local economies in areas surrounding breeding farms and hunting preserves have also seen revenues decline and some of the operations have been forced to lay off employees. If the rule is not changed in time for the preserves to benefit from this year’s hunting season not only will there be a significant loss in revenue to the industry and the Missouri economy, it is feared that more operators will be forced out of the business.

Prior to the implementation of the rule change more than two thousand (2,000) white-tail deer were annually exported to other states with sales totaling more than three (3) million dollars. Since the 2002 three (3) year surveillance requirement was enacted, sales of whitetail deer at Missouri livestock markets have dropped by more than ninety percent (90%) and the top selling price for a buck has plummeted from eleven thousand dollars ($11,000) to one thousand dollars ($1,000) in the same period. This once thriving segment of the industry is now all but nonexistent. Since the rule was amended the total economic impact in lost revenue in Missouri has been estimated to be more than ten (10) million dollars annually. Although this amount may seem small compared to Missouri’s total economy it is a substantial amount for one (1) small segment of Missouri agriculture. In the two (2) years since the rule change, extensive testing and epidemiologic studies have been conducted nationwide. The results have revealed no new infected herds outside the original eleven (11) states where the disease had been previously diagnosed. While the rule change lowers the required number of years for CWD surveillance from a three (3)-year to two (2)-year status it further requires that all captive white-tail deer entering Missouri with a two (2)-year status be tested for CWD upon the death of the animal regardless of the cause of death. MDA and its Animal Health Division are satisfied that the emergency rule change will continue to protect the public health, safety and welfare as well as Missouri livestock and cervids through surveillance and testing, while providing needed and immediate financial relief for the white-tail deer industry.

The Missouri Department of Agriculture strongly supports the emergency status of this rule change.

A proposed amendment, which covers the same material, is published in this issue of the Missouri Register. The scope of this emergency amendment is limited to the circumstances creating the emergency and complies with the protections extended in the Missouri and United States Constitutions. The Department of Agriculture believes this emergency amendment is fair to all interested persons and parties under the circumstances. Emergency amendment filed August 23, 2004, effective September 3, 2004 expires March 1, 2005.

(8) Miscellaneous and Exotic Animals. All exotic animals presented for exchange, barter, lease or sale at a licensed livestock market/sale must be accompanied by an official Certificate of Veterinary Inspection showing an individual listing of the common and scientific name(s) of the animal(s) and appropriate descriptions of animal(s) such as sex, age, weight, coloration and the permanent tag number, brand or tattoo identification.

(D) Captive cervids from out-of-state that arrive at a market/sale in Missouri must have an entry permit issued by the state veterinarian’s office and a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. Captive cervids from out-of-state that arrive at a market/sale must be in compliance with the guidelines as incorporated by reference to the Bovine Tuberculosis Eradication Uniform Methods and Rules, Effective January 22, 1999 and Brucellosis in Cervidae: Uniform Methods and Rules, Effective September 30, 1998. Movement of Missouri origin captive cervids must be in compliance with Missouri’s intrastate movement regulations.

1. All sexually intact animals six (6) months of age or older, not under quarantine and not affected with brucellosis, must test negative for brucellosis within thirty (30) days prior to arrival at the market/ sale, except
A. Brucellosis-free herd—captive cervids originating from certified brucellosis-free herds may be sold through a market/sale on the current herd number and test date;

B. Brucellosis-monitored herd—all sexually intact animals six (6) months of age or older must test negative for brucellosis within ninety (90) days prior to arrival at the market/sale.

2. Captive cervids not known to be affected with or exposed to tuberculosis and not in a status herd, as defined in the Bovine Tuberculosis Eradication Uniform Methods and Rules, Effective January 22, 1999, must have two (2) negative tuberculosis tests, not less than ninety (90) days apart, using the single cervical method. The second test must be within ninety (90) days prior to arrival at the market/sale.

3. Movement from status herds.

A. Accredited herds—captive cervids originating from accredited tuberculosis-free cervid herd as defined by the Bovine Tuberculosis Eradication Uniform Methods and Rules, Effective January 22, 1999, may be sold through a market/sale on the current herd number and test date.

B. Qualified herd—captive cervids originating from a qualified herd as defined by the Bovine Tuberculosis Eradication Uniform Methods and Rules, Effective January 22, 1999, must have one (1) negative tuberculosis test, using the single cervical method, within ninety (90) days prior to arrival at the market/sale.

C. Monitored herd—captive cervids originating from a monitored herd as defined by the Bovine Tuberculosis Eradication Uniform Methods and Rules, Effective January, 22, 1999, must have one (1) negative tuberculosis test, using the single cervical method, within ninety (90) days prior to arrival at the market/sale.

D. Captive cervids less than twelve (12) months of age that originate from and were born in qualified or monitored herds may be sold through a market/sale without further tuberculosis testing, provided that they are accompanied by a certificate stating that such captive cervids originated from such herds and have not been exposed to captive cervids from a lower status herd.

4. Captive cervids from an area that has been reported as a chronic wasting disease (CWD) endemic area or any cervid that has been in an endemic area in the last five (5) years will not be allowed to move through a Missouri livestock market/sale.

5. Elk, elk-hybrids[, white-tailed deer] and mule deer from all states must have participated in a surveillance program for at least three (3) years prior to moving through a Missouri livestock market/ sale. Other captive cervids other than white-tailed deer must have participated in a surveillance program recognized by the state of origin prior to moving through a Missouri livestock market/sale.

6. White-tailed deer from all states must have participated in a surveillance program for at least two (2) years prior to entering Missouri. Other captive cervids must have participated in a surveillance program recognized by the state of origin prior to entering Missouri.

7. All captive white-tailed deer that enter Missouri with a two (2)-year status in a CWD surveillance program and remain in Missouri at the time of death must be tested for CWD. AUTHORITY: section 277.160, RSMo 2000. Original rule filed June 15, 1990, effective Dec. 31, 1990. For intervening history, please consult the Code of State Regulations. Emergency amendment filed March 5, 2004, effective March 15, 2004, expires Aug. 27, 2004. Amended: Filed March 5, 2004. Emergency amendment filed Aug. 23, 2004, effective Sept. 3, 2004, expires March 1, 2005. A proposed amendment covering this same material is published in this issue of the Missouri Register.

http://www.sos.mo.gov/adrules/moreg/previous/2004/v29n19/v29n19a.pdf




Friday, January 15, 2010

Sixteen Additional Deer Test Positive for Chronic Wasting Disease In Hampshire County, West Virginia


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2010/01/sixteen-additional-deer-test-positive.html



Thursday, January 21, 2010

Chronic Wasting Disease Found in White-tailed Deer in Virginia


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2010/01/chronic-wasting-disease-found-in-white.html



CWD ILLINOIS UPDATE 2010 *Update January 6, 2010


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2010/01/cwd-illinois-update-2010.html



Thursday, January 21, 2010 Kansas has more CWD cases


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2010/01/kansas-has-more-cwd-cases.html



Sunday, December 06, 2009

Detection of Sub-Clinical CWD Infection in Conventional Test-Negative Deer Long after Oral Exposure to Urine and Feces from CWD+ Deer


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/12/detection-of-sub-clinical-cwd-infection.html



Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Infectious Prions in Pre-Clinical Deer and Transmission of Chronic Wasting Disease Solely by Environmental Exposure


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/06/infectious-prions-in-pre-clinical-deer.html



Friday, December 11, 2009

CWD, FECES, ORAL LESIONS, Aerosol and intranasal transmission


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/12/cwd-feces-oral-lesions-aerosol-and.html



Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Detection of protease-resistant cervid prion protein in water from a CWD-endemic area


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/10/detection-of-protease-resistant-cervid.html



AS THE CROW FLIES, SO DOES CWD

Sunday, November 01, 2009

American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and potential spreading of CWD through feces of digested infectious carcases


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/11/american-crows-corvus-brachyrhynchos.html


Sunday, October 04, 2009

CWD NEW MEXICO SPREADING SOUTH TO TEXAS 2009



http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/10/cwd-new-mexico-spreading-south-to-texas.html



Wednesday, January 07, 2009

CWD to tighten taxidermy rules Hunters need to understand regulations


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/01/cwd-to-tighten-taxidermy-rules-hunters.html



Monday, August 24, 2009

Third International CWD Symposium July 22-24, 2009 - Park City, Utah ABSTRACTS


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/08/third-international-cwd-symposium-july.html



Deer Carcass Decomposition and Potential Scavenger Exposure to Chronic Wasting Disease


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/07/deer-carcass-decomposition-and.html



CWD, GAME FARMS, BAITING, AND POLITICS


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/01/cwd-game-farms-baiting-and-politics.html



NOT only muscle, but now fat of CWD infected deer holds infectivity of the TSE (prion) agent. ...TSS

Monday, July 06, 2009

Prion infectivity in fat of deer with Chronic Wasting Disease


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/07/prion-infectivity-in-fat-of-deer-with.html



Friday, February 20, 2009

Both Sides of the Fence: A Strategic Review of Chronic Wasting Disease


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/02/both-sides-of-fence-strategic-review-of.html



Saturday, September 06, 2008

Chronic wasting disease in a Wisconsin white-tailed deer farm 79% INFECTION RATE

Contents: September 1 2008, Volume 20, Issue 5

snip...see full text ;



http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/11/commentary-crimes-hurt-essence-of.html



Tuesday, January 27, 2009

Chronic Wasting Disease found in a farmed elk from Olmsted County ST. PAUL, Minn. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Monday, January 26, 2009



http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/01/chronic-wasting-disease-found-in-farmed.html



Saturday, January 24, 2009

Research Project: Detection of TSE Agents in Livestock, Wildlife, Agricultural Products, and the Environment Location: 2008 Annual Report


http://bse-atypical.blogspot.com/2009/01/research-project-detection-of-tse.html



2008 CWD Laboratory Testing for Wild White-tailed Deer


http://www.michigan.gov/emergingdiseases/0,1607,7-186-25806-202922--,00.html



Wednesday, January 07, 2009

CWD to tighten taxidermy rules Hunters need to understand regulations


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/01/cwd-to-tighten-taxidermy-rules-hunters.html



Thursday, December 25, 2008 Lions and Prions and Deer Demise


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/12/lions-and-prions-and-deer-demise.html


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/



CWD Update 95 January 21, 2010



http://wildlifedisease.nbii.gov/documents/CWD%20Updates/update%2095.pdf



also see ;



http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/


TSS
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