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MORE I’m So Tired, Please See Me Through Eyes Of Compassion — Why Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Has Little To Do With&nbs

Posted Apr 11 2009 1:01am

fairy sleepy
picture by © fairy774

I am so tired, please see me through eyes of compassion. You may not be able to see it, but I am suffering; Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is a silent disease, that is gradually stealing my life from me.

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Dr. Bell’s Definition of “Fatigue”

Bell defines CFIDS symptoms as falling into four major clusters: so-called fatigue; neurological problems (balance, cognition, paresthesias, etc.); pain (”which can be anywhere-a lot of patients have skin pain, for example, and their doctor already thinks they’re a fruitcake, so it’s one of those symptoms the patient won’t even mention to the doctor”); and multiple sensitivities.

In a disease whose formal name is (still) chronic fatigue syndrome, it’s thought-provoking that Bell disdains the word “fatigue” as a “very inappropriate term for what patients experience. It’s not really fatigue at all, which is defined as a normal recovery state from exertion, and that is precisely what does NOT happen in this illness. It’s the limiting of activity that defines this illness. Anybody who works a 20-hour day will be fatigued, but they’ll recover from it-it’s not the same thing. A typical CFS patient might function on a minimal level (housework, minor errands) for a total of 3 or 4 hours a day. They may say they’re fatigued, but what’s really restricting their activity may be pain, like headache, tremulousness, or weakness-a sense that they are on the verge of collapse. That is not “fatigue” as we commonly think of it.”

Read the rest of this entry »

fairy sleepy
picture by © fairy774

I am so tired, please see me through eyes of compassion. You may not be able to see it, but I am suffering; Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is a silent disease, that is gradually stealing my life from me.

—————————————————————————————-

Dr. Bell’s Definition of “Fatigue”

Bell defines CFIDS symptoms as falling into four major clusters: so-called fatigue; neurological problems (balance, cognition, paresthesias, etc.); pain (”which can be anywhere-a lot of patients have skin pain, for example, and their doctor already thinks they’re a fruitcake, so it’s one of those symptoms the patient won’t even mention to the doctor”); and multiple sensitivities.

In a disease whose formal name is (still) chronic fatigue syndrome, it’s thought-provoking that Bell disdains the word “fatigue” as a “very inappropriate term for what patients experience. It’s not really fatigue at all, which is defined as a normal recovery state from exertion, and that is precisely what does NOT happen in this illness. It’s the limiting of activity that defines this illness. Anybody who works a 20-hour day will be fatigued, but they’ll recover from it-it’s not the same thing. A typical CFS patient might function on a minimal level (housework, minor errands) for a total of 3 or 4 hours a day. They may say they’re fatigued, but what’s really restricting their activity may be pain, like headache, tremulousness, or weakness-a sense that they are on the verge of collapse. That is not “fatigue” as we commonly think of it.”

Read the rest of this entry »

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