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Cryptogenic Chronic Hepatitis ¿Cause or effect of CFS?

Posted Dec 22 2011 8:48pm
I've seen my results with the hepatologist, no trace of virus B, C or CMV in my liver. But if there is a chronic inflammation that should not be there, and I have been diagnosed with cryptogenic chronic hepatitis (unknown etiology). I was prescribed a non fat diet, ursobilane 300mg (2-2-2) and sports. I see him again in 2 or 3 months.

He tells me that the reference values ​​of GPT and GOT are about to be changed next year to "30" by medical consensus in Spain, instead of 42 as they are now. I have a current value of 41.

He assures me that I have chronic hepatitis, because He has touched my liver and it is confirmed my biopsy and high transaminases, although within range in the current standard reference range. It is also supported by the rest of analisis done before showing apoptosis along these years, such as a high granzyme B, RNase-L, elastase, PKR, free DNA circulating in blood and the FAS ligands.

I keep on wondering if this is cause or consequence of CFS, because cryptogenic does not really solve the puzzle.

One theory that comes to my mind is the following
- CFS patients with undiagnosed autoimmune hepatitis, might be responding to Rituximab for being an autoimmune disease.
- CFS patients with chronic mutant hepatitis B or hidden hepatitis C, could be responding to Tenofovir (retroviral) for being a chronic viral disease.
- CFS patients with cryptogenic chronic hepatitis might respond to GcMaf if they carry an unknown pathogen.

They are just my theories, but in any case keep them in mind, because these are difficult to diagnose hepatitis cases and often go unnoticed by doctors.

In fact if your GPT and GOT are over 30 you should at least suspect, my hepatologist told me that in 2012 they will lower reference ranges for transaminases at 30 instead of 43 as they are today.

He also mentioned that physical examination of the liver requires a lot of experience and is not easy to detect hepatitis with the hands.

Finally, the 3 hepatitis described will not necessarily yield positive serology or even on PCR. Only a biopsy can rule it out with certainty.
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