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When are immunizations given?


Posted by Be Well

When are immunizations given?
 
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Most vaccinations are given during childhood. Some are given more than once to make sure the protection continues. This 'top-up' is called a booster.

The recommended timetable for childhood vaccinations is:

At two months old:

  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib) - one injection
  • Pneumococcal infection - pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) - one injection

At three months old:

  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib) - one injection
  • Meningitis C (meningococcal group C) (MenC) - one injection

At four months old:

  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib) - one injection
  • Meningitis C (meningococcal group C) (MenC) - one injection
  • Pneumococcal infection - pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) - one injection

At around 12 months old:

  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and meningitis C (Hib/MenC) - booster dose in one injection

At around 13 months old:

  • Measles, mumps and rubella (German measles) ( MMR) - one injection
  • Pneumococcal infection - pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) - one injection

Three years four months to five years old (pre-school):

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough) and polio (dTaP/IPV or DTaP/IPV) - one injection
  • Measles, mumps and rubella (German measles) ( MMR) - one injection

13 to 18 years old:

  • Diphtheria, tetanus and polio (Td/IPV) - one injection


Immunization appointment

It is important that your baby has their immunizations as near to two, three and four months of age as possible, to keep the risk of them catching these diseases as low as possible. Premature babies should also be immunized from two months after birth, regardless of how premature they were.

Gap between vaccinations

It is recommended that there is at least a month's gap between each vaccination to allow their body to build up an adequate immune response. If the gap between vaccinations is less than a month, then an adequate immune response cannot be guaranteed and the immunization may have to be redone.

If the gap between immunizations is longer than a month, you should just continue the course where you left off, although it is advised that your baby has immunizations at regular monthly intervals if possible. If you miss an appointment, make sure you contact your doctor's office as soon as possible to rearrange immunizations.

Other vaccinations

Other vaccinations are given in some situations:

  • Tetanus - if all childhood vaccinations are up-to-date, a tetanus booster is only needed for people who are at risk of getting tetanus following injury.
  • Polio - boosters are advised every 10 years for healthcare workers who may come into contact with the disease.
  • Flu vaccine and/or pneumococcal vaccine is offered to those over 65 years of age, and to people at risk from flu, or invasive pneumococcal infection.
  • Hepatitis B vaccine is offered to people who may come into contact with the disease, such as healthcare workers.
  • BCG (against tuberculosis, or TB). Those at high risk of TB (including babies and older people) will be vaccinated.

Vaccinations are also available to people traveling to areas where there may be serious diseases such as malaria, typhoid, or yellow fever. See your doctor well before your trip for advice about which vaccines you need.


NOTICE: The information provided on this site is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your physician or other qualified health provider because of something you have read on Wellsphere. If you have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately.
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