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Sedentary Habits During Teen Years Linked To Mid-Life Metabolic Syndrome

Posted Feb 01 2013 5:17pm

videogames

Reduce Sedentary Lifestyle As A Family…..Go For Walks Instead Of Playing Video Games Or Watching TV

From Your Health Journal…..”I love the Red Orbit web site and always try to promote their informative articles. I found a great one recently on Red Orbit called Sedentary Habits During Teen Years Linked To Mid-Life Metabolic Syndrome written by Connie K. Ho. A recent study found that 16-year-olds who watch television on a regular basis and live a sedentary lifestyle have an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome in their 40s. Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that include higher levels of blood lipids, abdominal obesity, hypertension and impaired glucose. Additionally, having metabolic syndrome can increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes. The bottom line, we need to reduce sedentary lifestyle. Modern day children spend a lot of time involved in technology, which does promote sedentary lifestyle. Children need to be active NOW to invest in the future. Many times, they need to understand that not taking care of their bodies at young ages may have ‘unhealthy’ repercussions later in life. So much research has also pointed to the fact that obese or overweight children grow up to obese or overweight adults. Change is needed…..and soon. Please visit the Red Orbit web site to read the complete article.”

From the article…..

A new study from researchers from Umeå University in Sweden found that 16-year-olds who watch television on a regular basis and live a sedentary lifestyle have an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome in their 40s.

In particular, the team of investigators found that a lack of exercise along with TV watching at age 16 resulted in a higher risk of developing metabolic syndrome by 43 years old. Metabolic syndrome refers to a group of conditions that include abdominal obesity, higher levels of blood lipids, hypertension and impaired glucose. In addition, having metabolic syndrome can elevate the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes.

“The results demonstrate that we need to consider how we can reduce sedentary lifestyle among children and adolescents,” explained the study’s lead author Patrik Wennberg, an adjunct professor of Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine at Umeå University, in a prepared statement. “It may be more important than only focusing on increased fitness and sports activities for those who are already interested.”

Past studies have also shown a link between a lack of physical activity and a higher risk of developing metabolic syndrome. The current study has shown how the connection between the two can extend past youth and into adulthood. The researchers were able to observe a group of 888 participants from 1981 to 2008. The subjects, who lived in Sweden and were in ninth grade at the start of the study, were given self-administered questionnaires. The findings were recently published in the journal Diabetes Care.

To read the full article….. Click here

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