Health knowledge made personal
Join this community!
› Share page:
Go
Search posts:

Research Wrap-Up: Recently Published Studies-January 13

Posted Jan 13 2011 12:00am

New published studies on children, media, and health which explore a range of topics:

Anderson, L. M. & Anderson, J. (2010). Barney and breakfast: Messages about food and eating in preschool television shows and how they may impact the development of eating behaviours in children. Early Child Development and Care,180(10), 1323-1336.

  • This study  found that non-nutritious foods  that appear in preschool children’s television shows are as common as nutritious foods and the consumption of non-nutritious food is usually reinforced.

Becker et al. (2011). Social network media exposure and adolescent eating pathology in Fiji. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 198(1),43-50

  • The authors found that social network media exposure was associated with eating pathology in this group of adolescent female ethnic Fijians.

Jordan, A.; Bleakley, A.; Manganello, J; Hennessy, M.; Steven,  R., & Fishbein, M. (2010). The role of television access in the viewing time of US adolescents. Journal of Children and Media,  4(4), 355-370.

  • The authors found that for adolescents having greater access to TV (number of televisions in the home, having a bedroom TV, and subscribing to premium cable/satellite channels)  was significantly associated with increased television viewing time.

Mendelsohn, A.L., Dreyer, B.P. ; Brockmeyer, C.A.; Berkule-Silberman, S.B.; Huberman, H.S. & Tomopoulos, S .(2011). Randomized controlled trial of primary care pediatric parenting programs: Effect on reduced media exposure in infants, mediated through enhanced parent-child interaction. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med., 165(1), 42-48.

  • This study found that exposure to Video Interaction Project intervention was associated with reduced total duration of media exposure compared with other interventions and control groups. Enhanced parent-child interactions were found to partially mediate relations between VIP and media exposure for families with a ninth grade or higher literacy level .

Sandberg, H.; Gidlof, K. & Holmberg, N. (2011). Children's exposure to and perceptions of online advertising. International Journal of Communication, 5, 21-50.

  • The study results suggest that Swedish teenagers are exposed to 10% of all the potential advertisements, but they are mainly unaware of this actual exposure. Food advertisements had the highest impact. FULL TEXT.
    ***

Use the free CMCH Database of Research to find other studies on children, media, and health.

Post a comment
Write a comment:

Related Searches