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A Day of Thanks to All of You! Happy Thanksgiving!

Posted Nov 24 2011 9:57am

Dear Readers,Tweeters and Friends of Little Bytes News...

Thank you for following along,stopping by and taking the time to visit my blog and/or leave comments and share my articles. I appreciate all of you and wish you and your family the best Thanksgiving! Enjoy time spent with family near and far, these are the moments that make memories and help to bond families. Keep your family and friends close and always show your thanks to God. Today is the day our Founders set aside for us to remember everything we are grateful for. I am most thankful for my beautiful family, my loving, hardworking husband and my two boys. May God bless you and yours and keep you healthy,safe and happy!



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Happy Thanksgiving
 

Thanksgiving is a particularly American holiday. The word evokes images of football, family reunions, roasted turkey with stuffing, pumpkin pie and, of course, the Pilgrims and Wampanoag, the acknowledged founders of the feast. But was it always so? Read on to find out...This article explores the development of our modern holiday. For information on food at the First Thanksgiving, go to Partakers of our Plenty . For additional children's resources on Thanksgiving, you might want to view Scholastic's Virtual Field Trip to Plimoth Plantation , explore our Online Learning Center , or visit our Homework Help page. If you'd like to join us for Thanksgiving dinner, please visit our Thanksgiving Dining and Special Events page.

Giving thanks for the Creator’s gifts had always been a part of Wampanoag daily life. From ancient times, Native People of North America have held ceremonies to give thanks for successful harvests, for the hope of a good growing season in the early spring, and for other good fortune such as the birth of a child. Giving thanks was, and still is, the primary reason for ceremonies or celebrations.
As with Native traditions in America, celebrations - complete with merrymaking and feasting - in England and throughout Europe after a successful crop are as ancient as the harvest-time itself. In 1621, when their labors were rewarded with a bountiful harvest after a year of sickness and scarcity, the Pilgrims gave thanks to God and celebrated His bounty in the Harvest Home tradition with feasting and sport (recreation). To these people of strong Christian faith, this was not merely a revel; it was also a joyous outpouring of gratitude.
Harvest WoodcutJan van de Velde, August from The Twelve Months (series of engravings), 1616. Collection of Plimoth Plantation.
The arrival of the Pilgrims and Puritans brought new Thanksgiving traditions to the American scene. Today’s national Thanksgiving celebration is a blend of two traditions: the New England custom of rejoicing after a successful harvest, based on ancient English harvest festivals; and the Puritan Thanksgiving, a solemn religious observance combining prayer and feasting.
Florida, Texas, Maine and Virginia each declare itself the site of the First Thanksgiving and historical documents support the various claims. Spanish explorers and other English Colonists celebrated religious services of thanksgiving years before Mayflower arrived. However, few people knew about these events until the 20th century. They were isolated celebrations, forgotten long before the establishment of the American holiday, and they played no role in the evolution of Thanksgiving. But as James W. Baker states in his book, Thanksgiving: The Biography of an American Holiday, "despite disagreements over the details" the 3-day event in Plymouth in the fall of 1621 was "the historical birth of the American Thanksgiving holiday."

So how did the Pilgrims and Wampanoag come to be identified with the First Thanksgiving?
Continue Reading
  ©2008-2011 Patricia Garza

 


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