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Alzheimer’s and Dementia Issues: Mom (or Dad) is Mad and Won’t Talk to Me

Posted Feb 08 2011 10:14am

A friend of mine told me that she confronted her mom about her memory loss and told her she was concerned it might be dementia or Alzheimer’s. Like many caregivers her hope was that she could convince her mom to visit a neurologist. Instead, her mom got furious and now won’t talk to her. My friend is devastated. She wonders if she stepped over the line, if she should have just made up another excuse to get her to the doctor, or if she should have just let it go. Now, there’s nothing but silence.

Being shut out of a loved one’s life really hurts. You question everything you said or did. You feel rejected when all you wanted to do was to help. What do you do now?

There’s no one right answer. Every family is different.

Suggestions for getting past the hurt: 

  • Give it some time–many people come around after their hurt and anger has subsided.
  • After a cooling off period, act like nothing has happened.
  • Try reasoning with them and assure them that avoiding the matter only makes it worse–and it might be a medication interaction or something else, but it’s best to know and be proactive.
  • Pull the “big guns” and insist the two of you go to the doctor–some people respond to a firm hand.
  • Try a bribe–is there something they’ve been wanting to do? For you to take them to see their sister, or take them to play the slots? Use whatever helps them safe face.
  • Send gifts and cards and lure them back. Be the bigger one and realize that you’re their lifeline and they need you right now–and if they want to “feel”  or “look” in charge, then let them.
  • Get someone else who’s on their good side to take them. They may not want to give into you, but they may go with their sister or best friend.
  • Leapfrog over a diagnosis and start dealing with the day-to-day concerns and issues you can do something about.

***

In the meantime, keep a journal. Make a note of any excuse, lie, avoidance, any times of confusion or bizarre findings such as the keys in the freezer, when they got lost coming home from the corner bank, or when they mentioned visiting a long deceased relative. As a caregiver you need to know what you’re dealing with and how often it’s happening.

Realize that a diagnosis isn’t going to do much–not in practical ways.

There’s no cure for dementia or Alzheimer’s and that the meds only work during the early phases of the disease and the medications only work on about half the people taking it, only slows the progression of the disease and typically only helps for about a year. But if your loved one is experiencing paranoia, anger issues, or anxiety, then ask about medications that can help these very real and very frustrating conditions.

If you suspect your loved one has memory loss then they probably do. so start working on practical aides (notes around the house, home monitoring, safety precautions such as a medical alert bracelet, and home help or live-in assistance, just to name a few).

Alzheimer’s and dementia certainly has its challenges, especially emotional ones. As the caregiver you have to be the bigger person. You have to do what’s right and not think about your feelings. Step over the hurt and find a way to reconnect.


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