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Tuesday’s prostate cancer news: November 11, 2008

Posted Dec 12 2008 3:41pm

This morning’s news updates are limited to:

  • Availability of the original abstract on the impact of statins on PSA levels
  • A review of the current potential of sural nerve grafting in association with radical prostatectomy

The abstract of the paper by Hamilton et al. discussing the lowering of PSA among men taking statins is now available on line. According to the abstract, the actual effects of statin therapy on PSA can be described as follows: (1) The overall average decline in PSA was only 4.1 percent for all 1,200 men in the study. However, (2) the men in whom the decline in PSA was greatest were those who saw the greatest decline in their LDL cholesterol level as a consequence of statin therapy and those at greatest potential need for prostate cancer risk evaluation because of a higher PSA level than the norm. The “New” Prostate Cancer InfoLink is still concerned that media reports of the impact of statins on PSA levels and therefore on prostate cancer risk may have been overblown (see original commentary ).

Mancuso and Rashid have reviewed available data on the potential of sural nerve grafting as a method to optimize the potential for erectile function following radical prostatectomy. Based on the available data, they conclude that, “Currently, there does not appear to be a widespread role for nerve grafting at the time of radical prostatectomy.”

Filed under: Diagnosis, Prevention, Treatment | Tagged: PSA, statin, sural nerve grafting

This morning’s news updates are limited to:

  • Availability of the original abstract on the impact of statins on PSA levels
  • A review of the current potential of sural nerve grafting in association with radical prostatectomy

The abstract of the paper by Hamilton et al. discussing the lowering of PSA among men taking statins is now available on line. According to the abstract, the actual effects of statin therapy on PSA can be described as follows: (1) The overall average decline in PSA was only 4.1 percent for all 1,200 men in the study. However, (2) the men in whom the decline in PSA was greatest were those who saw the greatest decline in their LDL cholesterol level as a consequence of statin therapy and those at greatest potential need for prostate cancer risk evaluation because of a higher PSA level than the norm. The “New” Prostate Cancer InfoLink is still concerned that media reports of the impact of statins on PSA levels and therefore on prostate cancer risk may have been overblown (see original commentary ).

Mancuso and Rashid have reviewed available data on the potential of sural nerve grafting as a method to optimize the potential for erectile function following radical prostatectomy. Based on the available data, they conclude that, “Currently, there does not appear to be a widespread role for nerve grafting at the time of radical prostatectomy.”

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