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Rising PSA levels in non-metastatic prostate cancer

Posted Dec 12 2008 3:41pm

In this month’s online issue of Oncology, you can read a full review by Moul et al. (not just the abstract) addressing the complexities of the management of a rising PSA in men with histologically proven but non-metastatic prostate cancer, i.e., men who have failed definitive therapy for localized disease or men who are initially diagnosed with progressive disease. This may be a useful article for many of our readers. (Dr. Moul is the Chairman of the Scientific Advisory Board of The “New” Prostate Cancer InfoLink.)

We would also direct readers to the editorial commentaries on this article by Dreicer and by Ward. In particular, we would draw people’s attention to the following comment made by Dr. Ward:

Prostate cancer is not one disease. It encompasses multiple diseases with a common name. This is true of primary tumors as well as those responsible for biochemical-only recurrence. The ultimate goal of ongoing research is the unraveling of the genetic or epigenetic events that drive prostate cancer metastasis and growth. It is hoped this molecular typing will guide our therapeutic interventions allowing us to limit or prevent prostate cancer progression and avoid unnecessary therapeutic morbidities.

This is an important point to remember in all one’s reading about prostate cancer. There is a vast diversity of clinical expressions of the various disorders we tend to lump together under the heading “prostate cancer.” Not only does this complicate the ability to prevent or manage prostate cancer effectively, it also makes it difficult to know whether, when, and how to implement a specific form of therapy in a specific individual at a specific time.

Filed under: Management, Treatment | Tagged: PSA, rising, non-metastatic

In this month’s online issue of Oncology, you can read a full review by Moul et al. (not just the abstract) addressing the complexities of the management of a rising PSA in men with histologically proven but non-metastatic prostate cancer, i.e., men who have failed definitive therapy for localized disease or men who are initially diagnosed with progressive disease. This may be a useful article for many of our readers. (Dr. Moul is the Chairman of the Scientific Advisory Board of The “New” Prostate Cancer InfoLink.)

We would also direct readers to the editorial commentaries on this article by Dreicer and by Ward. In particular, we would draw people’s attention to the following comment made by Dr. Ward:

Prostate cancer is not one disease. It encompasses multiple diseases with a common name. This is true of primary tumors as well as those responsible for biochemical-only recurrence. The ultimate goal of ongoing research is the unraveling of the genetic or epigenetic events that drive prostate cancer metastasis and growth. It is hoped this molecular typing will guide our therapeutic interventions allowing us to limit or prevent prostate cancer progression and avoid unnecessary therapeutic morbidities.

This is an important point to remember in all one’s reading about prostate cancer. There is a vast diversity of clinical expressions of the various disorders we tend to lump together under the heading “prostate cancer.” Not only does this complicate the ability to prevent or manage prostate cancer effectively, it also makes it difficult to know whether, when, and how to implement a specific form of therapy in a specific individual at a specific time.

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