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Mutant gene identified in 70 percent of prostate cancer tissues

Posted Dec 12 2008 3:41pm

It’s been a pretty quiet news day today, with the exception of the announcement ( by Reuters and others) of a publication by Schwartz et al. of the identification of a gene called BP1 in a high proportion of prostate cancer tissues and PIN (prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia) tissues.

The significance of this finding is open to considerable question at this point in time. We cannot say with any degree of certainty that the BP1 gene is a trigger for prostate cancer development because, for example, it may get “turned on” as a consequence of the earliest stages of prostate cancer development (as opposed to being a cause of that development starting).

Furthermore, it seems that overexpression of BP1 is common in patients with breast cancer and in women of African American ethnicity, which implies that its activities are far from exclusive to prostate cancer.

Filed under: Diagnosis | Tagged: BP1, mutant gene

It’s been a pretty quiet news day today, with the exception of the announcement ( by Reuters and others) of a publication by Schwartz et al. of the identification of a gene called BP1 in a high proportion of prostate cancer tissues and PIN (prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia) tissues.

The significance of this finding is open to considerable question at this point in time. We cannot say with any degree of certainty that the BP1 gene is a trigger for prostate cancer development because, for example, it may get “turned on” as a consequence of the earliest stages of prostate cancer development (as opposed to being a cause of that development starting).

Furthermore, it seems that overexpression of BP1 is common in patients with breast cancer and in women of African American ethnicity, which implies that its activities are far from exclusive to prostate cancer.

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