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Aspirin, NSAIDs also lower PSA levels

Posted Dec 12 2008 3:40pm

On October 31st we reported that statins lower PSA levels. Now comes evidence that aspirin and other NSAIDs also lower PSA levels, in both patients with prostate cancer and in men with no prostate cancer diagnosis.

According to another report from the American Association for Cancer Research meeting in Washington, DC, Fowke and colleagues at Vanderbilt University have demonstrated that regular aspirin and other NSAID users had PSA levels that were about 9 percent lower than those of non-users.

If we again assume that the average PSA of the undiagnosed men in question was potentially as high as 5 ng/ml if no aspirin or NSAID was being taken, this translates into a PSA level of 4.55 ng/ml among aspirin users. We are going to emphasize yet again that we are not aware of data that would suggest that there is any clinical significance to these data when it comes to the question of whether the patient might need a digital rectal examination.

We do recognize, however, that for a man with a PSA of 2.7 ng/ml if he took no regular aspirin, this effect might also lower his PSA to <2.5 ng/ml and push him into a cohort of men who might be considered to not need a biopsy if he took aspirin regularly to prevent cardiovascular disease. The bottom line is still straightforward. Always tell your doctors about every drug that you take — including that baby aspirin for cardiovascular prevention.

Filed under: Diagnosis, Prevention, Treatment | Tagged: Prevention, NSAID, aspirin

On October 31st we reported that statins lower PSA levels. Now comes evidence that aspirin and other NSAIDs also lower PSA levels, in both patients with prostate cancer and in men with no prostate cancer diagnosis.

According to another report from the American Association for Cancer Research meeting in Washington, DC, Fowke and colleagues at Vanderbilt University have demonstrated that regular aspirin and other NSAID users had PSA levels that were about 9 percent lower than those of non-users.

If we again assume that the average PSA of the undiagnosed men in question was potentially as high as 5 ng/ml if no aspirin or NSAID was being taken, this translates into a PSA level of 4.55 ng/ml among aspirin users. We are going to emphasize yet again that we are not aware of data that would suggest that there is any clinical significance to these data when it comes to the question of whether the patient might need a digital rectal examination.

We do recognize, however, that for a man with a PSA of 2.7 ng/ml if he took no regular aspirin, this effect might also lower his PSA to <2.5 ng/ml and push him into a cohort of men who might be considered to not need a biopsy if he took aspirin regularly to prevent cardiovascular disease. The bottom line is still straightforward. Always tell your doctors about every drug that you take — including that baby aspirin for cardiovascular prevention.

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