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itching theory tested: results are in

Posted Aug 28 2009 8:08pm

If you read about my itching episodes a few weeks back, you’ll know that I was testing Marvin’s theory. Here’s how it has resolved. ginger13-s

When the itching started in early July, we had made several guesses based on what was going on. We had just administered Buster’s anti-flea medication, Frontline®, and thought it might be that, particularly because after the initial flare, the itching seemed to be in my hands and feet. However, despite my further touching and petting Buster and walking barefoot over the carpet where he sleeps, I got no reaction.

used to stop at the Vernors plant on the way to the bus stop going home from Girls Catholic Central HS in Detroit

used to stop at the Vernors plant on the way to the bus stop going home from Girls Catholic Central HS in Detroit

Marvin’s theory was based on my strong itching episodes having followed my drinking a full glass of my favorite ginger ale by Vernors ®. I stopped drinking the ginger ale and wondered whether it might be just the special ingredients in that brand. We thought even that it might be something on the outside of the can that was causing a reaction from contact with my hand. But, then what about the feet :). Thankfully, it appears I can continue drinking Vernors.

The itching continued but was less severe, more localized to my hands and fee and less frequent. Marvin suggests it’s the ginger I’m taking morning, noon and night in various forms. He suggests I stop taking it. I’m in a quandary as ginger has been my mainstay in successfully fighting nausea.

So, I did. I stopped taking all ginger. The itching decreased and finally dissipated totally.

Last week I started having small doses of ginger in various forms, including my favorite ginger ale. No itching.

I suppose it could also have been a coincidence, leaving the true culprit yet a mystery. I have adjusted my ginger intake, just the same, and am still able to use ginger to control my nausea. My reaction to it seems to be more of a sensitivity to the amount of ginger I ingest rather than an allergy. I had no rash or other physical symptom, only itching. I had been taking ginger pretty much around the clock to keep it in my system. Now, I’m taking it at the first sign of any queasiness, and I limit my intake. I’m using my other remedies along with it to minimize my chances of becoming sensitive again.

I’ll continue to monitor this and to report back with any informtion I find on other incidences of sensitivity to ginger.

If you read about my itching episodes a few weeks back, you’ll know that I was testing Marvin’s theory. Here’s how it has resolved. ginger13-s

When the itching started in early July, we had made several guesses based on what was going on. We had just administered Buster’s anti-flea medication, Frontline®, and thought it might be that, particularly because after the initial flare, the itching seemed to be in my hands and feet. However, despite my further touching and petting Buster and walking barefoot over the carpet where he sleeps, I got no reaction.

used to stop at the Vernors plant on the way to the bus stop going home from Girls Catholic Central HS in Detroit

used to stop at the Vernors plant on the way to the bus stop going home from Girls Catholic Central HS in Detroit

Marvin’s theory was based on my strong itching episodes having followed my drinking a full glass of my favorite ginger ale by Vernors ®. I stopped drinking the ginger ale and wondered whether it might be just the special ingredients in that brand. We thought even that it might be something on the outside of the can that was causing a reaction from contact with my hand. But, then what about the feet :). Thankfully, it appears I can continue drinking Vernors.

The itching continued but was less severe, more localized to my hands and fee and less frequent. Marvin suggests it’s the ginger I’m taking morning, noon and night in various forms. He suggests I stop taking it. I’m in a quandary as ginger has been my mainstay in successfully fighting nausea.

So, I did. I stopped taking all ginger. The itching decreased and finally dissipated totally.

Last week I started having small doses of ginger in various forms, including my favorite ginger ale. No itching.

I suppose it could also have been a coincidence, leaving the true culprit yet a mystery. I have adjusted my ginger intake, just the same, and am still able to use ginger to control my nausea. My reaction to it seems to be more of a sensitivity to the amount of ginger I ingest rather than an allergy. I had no rash or other physical symptom, only itching. I had been taking ginger pretty much around the clock to keep it in my system. Now, I’m taking it at the first sign of any queasiness, and I limit my intake. I’m using my other remedies along with it to minimize my chances of becoming sensitive again.

I’ll continue to monitor this and to report back with any informtion I find on other incidences of sensitivity to ginger.

Hi Donna,

Didn’t know ginger could do that. Hope the itching doesn’t come back. I’m Hua, the director of Wellsphere’s HealthBlogger Network, a network of over 2,000 of the best health writers on the web (including doctors, nurses, healthy living professionals, and expert patients).  I think your blog would be a great addition to the Network, and I’d like to invite you to learn more about it and apply to join at Wellsphere.com/health-blogger.  Once approved by our Chief Medical Officer, your posts will be republished on Wellsphere where they will be available to over 5 million monthly visitors who come to the site looking for health information and support. There’s no cost and no extra work for you!  The HealthBlogger page ( http://www.wellsphere.com/health-blogger ) provides details about participation, but if you have any questions please feel free to email me at hua@wellsphere.com.

Best,
Hua

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