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breast cancer tribute dance

Posted Aug 28 2009 8:12pm

A friend told me about the tribute to breast cancer by So You Think You Can Dance last night. I missed it, so today I found it on youtube. I have watched the entire video once and the dance several times, which I have found to be compelling and beautiful. This performance touched me personally and wonderfully. I have removed the video link because it appears that SYTYCD or others have removed most of the videos from youtube. You can still go to youtube and search for the tribute to see if any are still available for viewing.

Choreographer: Tyce Diorio; Dancers: Melissa and Ade
Music: This Woman’s Work by Maxwell

Dance allows me to express so much of what I feel and find difficult to put into words. Watching this performance made me feel as though I were dancing. It captured emotions that are as much of the experience of having cancer as experiencing the physical effects of radiation, surgery and chemo. Pain. Fear. Hope. Rage. Joy. Isolation. Sharing. Vulnerability.

Beside coping with the pain that may accompany your episode of cancer, you struggle constantly between accepting and denying your diagnosis. It dominates your life from the moment your doctor says, I’m sorry to tell you . . . It takes you up high with the hope that your treatment is working and down again, trembling with the fear that you may die sooner than you had ever imagined. Even a minor test yielding satisfactory results sends you joyfully rejoicing. You savor that good news with every waking moment.

You isolate yourself, writhing with the decision of how much to share with others, on one hand desperately needing comfort and on the other fearing that you will accost them with your naked insecurity. And, when your healing treatments leave you sick and your emotions lie raw and bleeding, you wince with the recognition that vulnerability has perched itself on your shoulder. Still, you seek and appreciate beauty more than ever and look for every opportunity to enrich your life in the ways that hold meaning for you: your relationships, family, creativity, spiritualism or whatever it might be.

Diorio’s choreography and Melissa and Ade’s performance really conveyed so many of these emotions so well for me. The dance showed many levels of conflict along with the extraordinary relationship between the care giver and care recipient. The dancers capably and beautifully exhibited the emotional complexity that accompanies the experience of breast cancer.

I add my own congratulations to them on a fine performance that touched the hearts of so many people. Bravo.

5 6 7 8

A friend told me about the tribute to breast cancer by So You Think You Can Dance last night. I missed it, so today I found it on youtube. I have watched the entire video once and the dance several times, which I have found to be compelling and beautiful. This performance touched me personally and wonderfully. I have removed the video link because it appears that SYTYCD or others have removed most of the videos from youtube. You can still go to youtube and search for the tribute to see if any are still available for viewing.

Choreographer: Tyce Diorio; Dancers: Melissa and Ade
Music: This Woman’s Work by Maxwell

Dance allows me to express so much of what I feel and find difficult to put into words. Watching this performance made me feel as though I were dancing. It captured emotions that are as much of the experience of having cancer as experiencing the physical effects of radiation, surgery and chemo. Pain. Fear. Hope. Rage. Joy. Isolation. Sharing. Vulnerability.

Beside coping with the pain that may accompany your episode of cancer, you struggle constantly between accepting and denying your diagnosis. It dominates your life from the moment your doctor says, I’m sorry to tell you . . . It takes you up high with the hope that your treatment is working and down again, trembling with the fear that you may die sooner than you had ever imagined. Even a minor test yielding satisfactory results sends you joyfully rejoicing. You savor that good news with every waking moment.

You isolate yourself, writhing with the decision of how much to share with others, on one hand desperately needing comfort and on the other fearing that you will accost them with your naked insecurity. And, when your healing treatments leave you sick and your emotions lie raw and bleeding, you wince with the recognition that vulnerability has perched itself on your shoulder. Still, you seek and appreciate beauty more than ever and look for every opportunity to enrich your life in the ways that hold meaning for you: your relationships, family, creativity, spiritualism or whatever it might be.

Diorio’s choreography and Melissa and Ade’s performance really conveyed so many of these emotions so well for me. The dance showed many levels of conflict along with the extraordinary relationship between the care giver and care recipient. The dancers capably and beautifully exhibited the emotional complexity that accompanies the experience of breast cancer.

I add my own congratulations to them on a fine performance that touched the hearts of so many people. Bravo.

5 6 7 8

high highs and low lows. Hard to believe a dance of only a few minutes could portray such emotions. You have certainly had your share of highs and lows! I look forward to reading more of your journey.

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