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Yet more thoughts on TBI and mental illness

Posted Jun 15 2009 6:27pm

This morning (6/9/9), I took a gander at the ways people have been finding their ways to this blog since I first started it over a year ago.

  • 38 people got here by looking for info about TBI/brains and anger/rage
  • 86 got here just searching on tbi
  • 156 got here by searching for info on interviewing
  • 39 people got here by searching for brain info
  • 225 people found their ways here by searching on tbi and mental illness

Apparently, it’s something people are concerned about.

And so am I.

I’m worried. Really, really worried. Because this society seems all too eager to label people “mentally ill” when they really have logistical problems — it’s not necessarily that they aren’t thinking properly, ’cause of some inner psychological conflict going on — it’s that they can’t think properly, ’cause their brains have been rattled or somehow impacted.

And our society seems all too eager to prescribe medicines for psychological conditions — meds which may actually exacerbate the issues at hand.

For instance, as I understand it, the irritability and temper flares that come with TBI are often due to a “constant inner restlessness” that takes up residence in your head after a brain injury. That constant restlessness can be directly related to something called “tonic arousal” which (as I understand it) has to do with how awake your brain is. After TBI, certain functions slow down — processing slows down, connections that were once intact are now broken, so it takes the brain longer to sort things out. And with that slowness comes a decrease in tonic arousal… which also can lead to attention difficulties… which can feed into all sorts of problems that can make you nuts and drive you to distraction.

TBI >>> less tonic arousal >>> increased irritability >>> more meltdowns, rage, blow-ups, etc.

Now, let’s say some doctor or psychiatrist gets hold of a TBI survivor and diagnoses them with some anxiety-related condition, or some other “psychological” dysfunction. Let’s say the attending caretaker prescribes one of those “downregulators” that slows down the processes that can feed into manic/anxiety type experiences. What do you get when you downregulate someone who’s already struggling to keep up? Decreased tonic arousal. Which can mean more irritability, more temper flares, more rage, more meltdowns… possibly increased violent acting out? Maybe?

Downregulating meds >>> even less tonic arousal >>> even more increased irritability >>> more and more and more meltdowns, rage, blow-ups, etc.

I’m not a doctor, but I don’t think you need to be one, to get this connection. Maybe not being a doctor helps you see it all the clearer, without the long-term effects of that sleep-deprived-traumatized-resident fog that lots of docs get hammered by when they first start practicing.

This really worries me — had I mentioned that?

And given how many people sustain TBIs each year, not to mention how many vets are returning from Iraq and Afghanistan with TBI’s and PTSD, etc., it really opens the door to a lot of crappy medicine and pain for the families and friends of the folks who have given their very brains in service to this country.

I think the only thing we can hope to do is educate people — not so much the doctors, because how many of them are listening? It’s about educating “the people” — the patients who look high and low for help (if they ever figure out that they need — and can get) help. Making sure people have access to truthful and accurate and independent information — and giving them easy and useful ways to wield that info as they defend themselves from the quacks of the world, not to mention Big Pharma.

Ultimately, it is up to each and every one of us to fend for ourselves, but a little help would be nice, now and then…

Posted in Afghanistan, anger, anger management, coping strategies, depression, diagnostic testing, doctor, head injury, Head Trauma, Iraq, life, mental health, Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, mtbi, Neuropsychological Effects of TBI, Personal Experiences with TBI, physician, post traumatic stress disorder, PTSD, sports concussion, tbi, tbi education, TBI Rehab, TBI Symptoms, thoughts, trauma, traumatic brain injury, veterans, wounded warriors Tagged: Afghanistan, anger management, blogging, brain damage, Brain Injury, cognitive-behavioral issues, diagnosis, doctor, dopamine downregulator, education, head injury, Head Trauma, Iraq, irritability, life, medical care, medication, mental health, mental illness, mentally ill, mild tbi, Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, Motivation and Inspiration, mtbi, Neuropsychological Effects of TBI, Personal Experiences with TBI, psychiatric condition, psychiatry, psychoactive drugs, psychology, psychopharmacology, psychotherapy, PTSD, rage, recovery, rehabilitation, Social Issues, tbi, tbi education, TBI Physiology, TBI Rehab, TBI Resources, tbi survivor, TBI Symptoms, thoughts, traumatic brain injury, veterans, Work issues
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