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Yes, I’m back…

Posted Sep 05 2009 10:58pm

Well, that was interesting…

I stepped away from regular posting for a little while, thinking that I was going to make a change (a number of changes, actually) in how and when I write, how and when I post, and what I write and post about. My motivation was the intent to err on the side of caution, as I was starting to feel, well, exposed by all these posts. I’ve shared a lot of personal information here, and frankly, it started to spook me out a bit. It’s always been my intention to speak fairly personally here, to share details about my life that might be considered “intimate” by some, but to just let it all hang out, because when it comes to personal health issues, especially TBI, there aren’t a lot of sources that speak directly to us as human beings, and put a real face on our experiences.

All too often (especially given the state of healthcare in the US at this time), we are assigned patient IDs, given little plastic cards with our numbers on them, added to hospital and clinic databases, issued either a prescription for pills or told to ‘get more exercise’ and more actively control our stress. That’s if we get any help at all. Lots and lots of us never get the help we need when we need it – or if we get it, it’s not till much, much later, after considerable damage has been done. And we’re left to struggle along, muddle through, and generally find our way by trial and error.

It’s been my hope that this blog would help alleviate some of that. Give people a bit of hope. Offer my own experiences as a resource for others who don’t know where to turn. It hasn’t been perfect, by any stretch. But as of today, I’ve had 35,928 different page views. Not bad, for about 18 months of work.

And when I announced that I was going to be shifting my focus (I wasn’t really specific), I did hear from some folks about how they wished I wouldn’t go away and quit keeping this blog. It gave me pause. And over coffee this morning, I decided, “Oh, what the hell — I’m come this far, why pull out now?”

Interestingly, a lot of the page views are for posts I wrote many months ago, so the content has value for people (apparently) beyond the immediate moment when I write it. That’s one of my goals — to have “evergreen” material here that people can find useful, even if they are stumbling across the info many months after I first wrote it. These issues of ours are, unfortunately, very tenacious, and they don’t go away.  So, as long as I’m not a complete and total narcissist about this, and do it just for ego-casting, it makes sense for me to continue.

So, given that I believe in this work, and others have told me it’s needed, I’ve decided to restore my past posts for folks who are looking for info on dealing with mild TBI or PTSD. It’s pretty important work, whether or not I’m doing it. And I realized over the past days of not doing it, how much I love it. It’s not just about me and my life — it’s about chronicling human experience and finding workable solutions to tenacious problems, to share with others.

I do love the work, so yes, I’m back.

Now, I need to tell you why I pulled away so abruptly in the first place.

There are several reasons, which are actually closely related — and everyone who does health research and posting online needs to think about this very carefully. Please pay attention to this, as it may pertain to you, as well.

First, there are basic survival issues at stake.

I’m in a position where I may need to look for a new job in another three months or so. My COBRA-supported health insurance stops being subsidized at the end of this year, which means my health insurance costs are going to more than triple.  I have been offered lower cost coverage, but it doesn’t provide ample coverage for me, and I cannot, under any circumstances, get lousy health insurance, if I’m going to continue to see my neuropsych and psychotherapist.

The job I am in now, which is just a contract, may not pay me the money I need to keep going, so that means, I need to do some hard thinking about what work I do for a living. I have been needing to branch out from what I’ve been doing, for the past 15 years, and see where else my technical skills can take me. I need to update my skillset and expand my resume and portfolio, and that takes time. It takes time to keep this blog. I have regularly spent the first hour or two of most days in the week posting here, and that is time I could be spending on developing my skills.

I have a hell of a time keeping focused and sharp. I only have so many resources, and I only have so much energy. I need to feed my family and keep a roof over our heads, and I have to take my professional performance to the next level. That means something may have to give, and until this morning, I was convinced it was this blog. I only have time for really essential things, these days — given how much longer it takes me to read and comprehend and learn and keep my act together (compared to how I was before I fell in 2004), I have to carefully pick and choose what I do, and save my best energy for my most lucrative and financially beneficial activities.

More on this later…

The second reason I decided to give up this blog, was because of privacy issues and my concerns over this information working against me in this job market.

Let’s face it, traumatic brain injury is not the sort of thing that most employers embrace wholeheartedly. It’s highly stigmatized and people just do not understand it. It’s one thing, if you’re a veteran returning from the front lines of the War On Terror, and you come back after having been head-injured in a roadside IED blast while safeguarding our freedom. That’s something that (many) people can see as worthy of respect and consideration. People support troops. They have compassion for victims of insurgent attacks — Important Note: Please don’t think I am making light of combat TBI, or assuming that every returning soldier gets the full compassion and cooperation from the normal world upon their return. I only wish it were so. — But a traumatic brain injury sustained in a car accident or a fall down some stairs or having something fall on your head is harder to explain as the serious issue it can be — especially when popular culture ( including Pepsi during the Super Bowl ) makes light of head injury and promotes the perception that you can just shake it off, say “I’m OK — I’m good” and everything is hunky dory.

Even if people do understand that TBI (mild, moderate, or severe) can cause tremendous difficulties at the start, plenty of folks are of the belief that things should just sort themselves out over time. Indeed, many neurologists believe just that — including one I had the misfortune to visit when I was just starting out on this serious diagnostic/rehab quest of mine.

Now, given the types of information I have posted here, and given the breadth and depth of my own issues which I have willingly and eagerly chronicled here, I am admittedly putting myself in a very vulnerable position. No joke. Every so often, news comes out of some blogger being “outed” by their hosting service, because they’ve said something that pissed off someone with a vested interest in what they were discussing. And that blogger — like Valerie Plame — is exposed and banished from their position and/or blog. Recently, a Scottish policeman who blogged very candidly about his work, was exposed and dismissed from his job, and down came the blog. Which was a loss for everyone, especially him.

I have no interest in repeating his performance. I want to speak freely and do my part to support others, but at what potential cost? I’ve got to keep the money coming in. I have a grown-up life in the grown-up world, and I have a family to support. Thinking about the possibility of being fingered and stigmatized by what folks read here spooked me pretty badly, so I decided to back off the posting.

Third, all this personal health/medical information floating around online might not be such a great idea.

I mean, seriously. This whole “Health 2.0 — community-driven health research and open-source information sharing” strikes me as possibly the worst idea to come along since, oh, the collusion of church and state. There are many health information sites and communities which give people the chance to post personal information about their health concerns as well as engage in discussions with others. Some of the conditions are serious, some of them are relatively benign. But they are all personal. And lots and lots of people are not very careful about hiding their identities when they post to them. In my visits to various Health 2.0 sites, I see a lot of people using their real names, talking about their real conditions, and I wonder if they realize their information is visible to as many people as it is — including potential employers and insurers… not to mention the government.

Now, I am not a conspiracy theorist, and I’m not the kind of person who thinks the government is out to get us all, in some Matrix-movie-type of blue-pill-induced power grab, where everyone is walking around like zombies, feeding the machine unwittingly with their vital life force. I think real life is a lot more complicated than that. But I do believe that if unscrupulous individuals and organizations have free access to lots of personal information, they have plenty of opportunity to do unscrupulous things with that data.  It’s not a question of the right people having access to the right information (like members of a forum or online community) or the wrong people having access to the wrong information (like private investigators trying to dig up dirt on genuinely injured people who the insurance company doesn’t want to cover). It’s a question of all the information being accessible to any people who care to get at it.

And believe you me, people who really want to get to it, will. It’s not that hard — either they can do it by trickery (like in phishing emails from Big Banks that have links to them pointing to some .ru website that looks really official), or they can do it by hackery. I’m not paranoid. I’m just a highly experienced information technology veteran who has been active in a highly regulated and highly sensitive sector for quite some time. Wait — maybe I am paranoid ;) Can you blame me?

Anyway, the thought that my own personal information is floating around out there — albeit in an anonymous fashion — sorta kinda spooked me, so I yanked it in a hurry, one frantic afternoon. I hadn’t been sleeping well, I was in a lot of pain, and I was contemplating the prospect of a potential employer finding out all about me and saying, “Why the hell would I hire some washed-up, brain-damaged has-been who runs around telling everyone how much difficulty they have doing basic stuff? Where’s the ROI on that?” In my mind, my whole way of life was seriously threatened, and I had to do somethign to take the pressure off.

So, I disappeared. And I thought it would make me feel better.

But, as you can see, it didn’t. I felt like I’d abandoned my post. I felt like I’d deserted those  who trusted me, and I felt like a total loser.

So, I turned around and came back. And here I am.

I am still a bit uncomfortable with being this vulnerable, but it’s the only way that really works for me. The truth is not a simple thing, and the full range of human experience is not a cut-and-dried, clean and tidy topic. It’s messy. It’s inconvenient. It’s exposing. It’s vulnerable. And at its very best, when it’s done properly and honestly, it turns us all into deeply fragile creatures whose lives literally hang by a thread at times.

Le’ts be honest, people. The very fact that a lot of us are alive is proof of miracles. The fact that any of us emerges from the womb with 10 fingers and 10 toes and all our organs intact, is nothing less than amazing. The very fact that countless people, over the course of human history, have been terribly, terribly injured — both within and without — and yet have survived, or even thrived, is further proof that we frankly don’t know shit about how everything is put together, and trying to come up with pat answers or reduce the deepest mysteries of the human spirit to reproducible, mechanized formulas is an exercise in futility.

Certainly, we will never stop trying to decode life’s intricacies, but deep down inside, we all have to admit that there’s way too much mystery surrounding us, for any of our arbitrary rules to apply for long.

So, that being said, I’m going to reverse my former position and venture back out into the light of day with this blog. I am still very concerned by the Health 2.0 movement to get everyone to put their health information online. Google Health, and other publicly available patient records management programs, scare the living daylights out of me. And the fact that people are embracing this innately non-secure, non-private, non-controllable new trend — which can have personally devastating consequences for individuals whose privacy is compromised — worries me deeply.

But I’m still going to keep blogging. I’m still going to keep talking.  Above all, I’m not going to stop believing that the power of the mind and the human spirit can — and do — work together to triumph over the injuries of the brain.

Posted in Afghanistan, blogging, brain, Brain Injury, concussion, Employment, head injury, Head Trauma, Iraq, life, Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, mtbi, Neuropsychological Effects of TBI, Personal Experiences with TBI, psychotherapy, PTSD, Social Issues, soldiers, tbi, tbi education, TBI Rehab, TBI Symptoms, therapy, thoughts, traumatic brain injury, veterans, Work issues Tagged: blogging, brain damage, Brain Injury, cognitive-behavioral issues, concussion, education, Employment, Family Issues, fatigue, head injury, Head Trauma, inspiration, life, Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, Motivation and Inspiration, mtbi, Neuropsychological Effects of TBI, Personal Experiences with TBI, post-traumatic stress, PTSD, recovery, rehabilitation, Social Issues, tbi education, TBI Physiology, TBI Rehab, TBI Resources, tbi survivor, TBI Symptoms, thoughts, traumatic brain injury, veterans, Work issues
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