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One Response to “What Activity Can I Do That Relates To How Stroke Affects Communication?”

Posted Jan 25 2010 12:00am
What Activity Can I Do That Relates To How Stroke Affects Communication?
Im doing a presentation on “how stroke affects communication”. i would like to include an activity so that my audience can participate in it. Does anyone know an activity or something that relates to my main topic?
I suffered an embolic stroke in August 2006 and I was aphasiac (unable to speak properly). I was very lucky in that I got the hospital ER within 20 minutes. Within one hour the clot-busting drug tPA was administered. Seventeen hours later I was able to speak normally once again. I still retain a small level of disability that I just have to deal with everyday.
1) Get 3 people.
2) The first person represents the ears (hearing). The second person represents the stroke patient with aphasia. (the patient’s mind). The third person represents the stroke patient’s speech.
3) Someone in the audience asks a question. (e.g. “Where were you born?” )
4) The hearing, the 1st person, recites the question to the 2nd person, the mind.
5) The 2nd person forms a reasonable and understandable answer and then recites this answer to the third person, the speech.
6) The third person, speech, utters the answer as jibberish (in a drunken incoherent-like slobber)
This is why stroke-related aphasia is disheartening and depressing to a stroke patient.
You can juggle what function the 3 persons have to depict different debilitating stroke conditions. The audience actually represents the stoke patient’s environment.
Take look at the link below as stroke induced aphasia can also impact the ability to understand questions that are asked or that are read back by the patient.
Stroke related paralysis can also impact the ability to write as well.
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