Health knowledge made personal
Join this community!
› Share page:
Go
Search posts:

Day 22: Parkinson’s Disease and Dementia, Part 2

Posted Apr 22 2014 9:38am

Although Parkinson’s disease is widely known as a movement disorder, people are becoming well aware that it can (and does) include dementia along with its already too long list of symptoms that develop as the disease progresses.  More commonly associated with tremors and rigidity, dystonia and more, people with Parkinson’s have a six times greater risk of developing dementia  than others.

Dementia is described as a significant loss in brain function, and can include memory issues, a slowing down of one’s thought processes, concentration diifficulties, apathy, and hallucinations. It also tends to be less common in the initial stages of early onset Parkinson’s (you get to have it longer but at least you may not have to deal with the dementia aspect as soon).  However, as you gain birthdays, your chances of dementia gaining ground increases. So, stop having birthdays. 
 
There are two types of dementia the Parkinson’s patient looks at (why bother with more – two’s already two too many) – Parkinson’s dementia and  dementia with Lewy bodies .  

If a patient with PD develops dementia at least a year after the onset of motor symptoms that are related to PD, this is known as Parkinson’s dementia. If symptoms of dementia appear before or at the same time as Parkinson’s symptoms, this is known at Lewy body dementia. Much like Parkinson’s disease, symptoms vary from patient to patient according to variables present. 

Those who go on to develop dementia in PD, in addition to motor problems, have a greater deterioration in their attention, an inability to judge the environment around them, and struggle with their ability to be flexible. Their memory problems, however, are not as severe as those found in people with Alzheimer’s disease.  

Though those with dementia and having Parkinson’s disease may not endure the severity of memory issues as those of an Alzheimer’s  patient, they do have to deal with changes in their attention span, cognition (the activities of thinking, understanding, learning, and remembering) and their ability/inability to carry out tasks. They also frequently deal with having hallucinations and sleep disturbances.

Having symptoms of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in/with Parkinson’s disease is not uncommon and it is estimated that one-quarter to one-third of people (some research shows a whopping 50-60% but for now we’ll ignore those numbers as 40% tends to be high enough) with the disease have (or will have) MCI. Research also shows that 80% of patients who have had PD 20 years +, will have have developed dementia. Take into consideration that most people are diagnosed after the age of 65… Let’s not even go there for YOPD…

Most all patients with Parkinson’s disease have been concerned at one time or another as to whether or not they will develop dementia. Research has shown that MCI  can help to identify early signs of demetia in people with PD, quickening the onset of treatment.

There is evidence that treatment with rivastigmine can greatly improve the symptoms of dementia for a period of time, controling the symptoms of dementia and having a positive effect on them. There are other meds available to control symptoms

In part one of  Parkinson’s Disease and Dementia , we talked about those little monsters called ‘Lewy bodies’. It is believed that only a small minority of people with Parkinson’s do not have Lewy bodies. In early stages, they are mainly found in the middle part of the brain – also known as ‘middle brain’ in the Hobbit world. Later, the Lewy bodies spread to other areas of the brain, thus earning the name ‘little monsters’.

Come back tomorrow for part three of Parkinson’s Disease and Dementia where we’ll talk about the havoc those little monsters wreak called ‘hallucinations‘. Shoud be boatloads of fun…

 

 

The post appeared first on .

Post a comment
Write a comment:

Related Searches