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Dachel Media Update: An Anorexic Comparison from the Unfunny Baron-Cohen

Posted Aug 01 2013 12:00am

 
 
Huffington

"Scientists studying girls with the eating disorder anorexia have found they show a mild echo of the characteristics of autism - a finding which could point to new ways of helping anorexics overcome their illness.

"A study by the leading autism expert Simon Baron-Cohen at Cambridge University's Autism Research Centre found that compared to typical girls, those with anorexia have an above-average number of autistic traits.

"They were also found to have an above-average interest in systems and order, and below-average scores in empathy - a profile similar, but less pronounced, to that seen in people with autism, suggesting the two disorders may have common underlying features, Baron-Cohen said."
 
Notice the slide show included here. Facts about Autism---Fact #6: "Research Shows That There Is No Link Between The Onset Of Autism And Vaccinations."  I posted lots of comments.

Fox News

"Scientists studying girls with the eating disorder anorexia have found they show a mild echo of the characteristics of autism - a finding which could point to new ways of helping anorexics overcome their illness.

"A study by the leading autism expert Simon Baron-Cohen at Cambridge University's Autism Research Centre found that compared to typical girls, those with anorexia have an above-average number of autistic traits.

"They were also found to have an above-average interest in systems and order, and below-average scores in empathy - a profile similar, but less pronounced, to that seen in people with autism, suggesting the two disorders may have common underlying features, Baron-Cohen said..... In Europe experts say the rate is around one in 100 children. Most cases are diagnosed in boys."
Baron-Cohen finds autism to be an interesting genetic disorder. He has long denied any real increase and pretends that there are just as many autistic adults as children. His definition of autism trivializes what ASD kids live with. So, is anorexia also on the autism spectrum? No comments here.
 
Mercola.com

"Now that it looks like ABC-TV executives are backing Barbara Walters’ hire of celebrity Jenny McCarthy to join the popular daytime talk show "The View",1 the blood that spilled on the ground of the Fourth Estate during 10 hot days in July is beginning to dry.

"It was fascinating to watch the well-orchestrated response by online mainstream media, which took on the frenzy of an old fashioned witch hunt to burn a heretic at the stake."
Barbara Loe Fisher brilliantly summarized what's behind the ferocious media attack on Jenny McCarthy's new job at The View.

Miami Herald

"'We started the academy in response to a growing need,' Kabot said.

"The $35,000-a-year academy, which will run 8 a.m.-2 p.m. and follow the Broward County Public Schools calendar, will offer small classes with two students per teacher. Students can attend the school on a McKay Scholarship, which is offered by the state. No transportation or food service will be provided....

"Kabot said the prevalence of children being diagnosed with autism continues to rise - now with one out of every 50 children being diagnosed.

"'With more and more people being identified, the need becomes greater,' she said."
 
More and more kids with autism.  More and more schools for them.  More and more people just don't care.
 
Huffington

 
"The latest estimates indicate that one in 88 children in the United States is affected by an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The rate of ASD diagnosis has been steadily rising over the last decade. ASD is a condition in which individuals struggle with social interaction and communication, often coupled with a limited range of interests and a preference for a set routine.
 
"One of the questions I am most commonly asked as a psychiatrist specializing in child psychiatry is, "What causes autism?" The dissatisfying, but truthful answer is that nobody really knows. It is probably due to a variety of factors, including genetic and environmental influences. My answer, however, often leaves the questioner feeling a little bit shortchanged, especially with the current surge of new reports linking yet another "risk factor" to autism. In the last couple of months alone, air pollution, gluten sensitivity, maternal antibodies, a lack of folic acid and a number of genetic mutations have all emerged as possible causes of this spectrum disorder. Hence the question arises: why is it so difficult for doctors and scientists to pinpoint the cause for this growing and serious condition? ..."
 
Here a psychiatrist is out to convince us that it's all right if we don't know what causes autism; it's not such a bad thing, after all.  I have posted comments.  Don't see them yet.
 
 

"The aspects of autism that can make everyday life challenging-reading social cues, understanding another's perspectives, making small talk and exchanging niceties-can be seriously magnified when it comes to dating. Though the American Psychiatric Association defines autism as a spectrum disorder-some people do not speak at all and have disabilities that make traditional relationships (let alone romantic ones) largely unfeasible, but there are also many who are on the "high-functioning" end and do have a clear desire for dating and romance.

"Autism diagnosis rates have increased dramatically over the last two decades (the latest CDC reports show one in 50 children are diagnosed), and while much attention has been paid to early-intervention programs for toddlers and younger children, teens and adults with autism have largely been overlooked-especially when it comes to building romantic relationships.

"Certain characteristics associated with the autism spectrum inherently go against typical dating norms. For example, while a "neuro-typical" person might think a bar is great place for a first date, it could be one of the worst spots for someone on the spectrum. Dorsey Massey, a social worker who helps run dating and social programs for adults with various intellectual disabilities, explained, "If it's a loud, crowded place, an individual on the spectrum may be uncomfortable or distracted." Sensory issues may also make certain lights and noises especially unpleasant."

The fact that The Atlantic is even reporting on this shows that no one takes autism seriously. We can muse about things like this because autism is merely an interesting curiosity, not a crisis.
I could see discussing this topic if our understanding of autism weren't so abysmal to begin with. Two percent of children with autism is a national health care emergency. (That includes a rate of one in 31 among boys alone.)  Officially, there's no known cause, cure or prevention for autism. When a child that was born healthy and is developing normally suddenly loses learned skills and regresses into autism, doctors stand around clueless. No one has ever been able to find a comparable rate of autism among adults and that simple fact should be scaring everyone.

Parents aren't that concerned about who their autistic children will date when they're busy dealing with things like
Will my child ever talk?

When will doctors be able to help my autistic child with seizures, bowel disease, and sleep disorder?
How will we be able to pay for the overwhelming cost of autism therapy?

Will my child ever be able to hold down a job?

What will happen to my child when we're no longer here to care for him?

The is the real world of autism.

The Washington Times:

"A family reported being told that it was 'a Medicaid necessity … to answer a firearms question.' Some parents said they were asked to leave the examining room so that the doctor could force their child to inform on them in secret....
 
"The doctors groups’ justification that they are just providing medical care to parents does not hold water, as the lead plaintiffs in the case are rabidly anti-gun. The American Academy of Pediatrics gives this 'advice to parents' on its website: “Do not purchase a gun, especially a handgun. Remove all guns present in the home.” It also instructed those who refuse to obey that they should 'always keep the gun unloaded and locked up. Lock and store the bullets in a separate place.'
 
"The Florida law should be a model for the nation on keeping doctors in check when it comes to the privacy of parents to safely and responsibly keep arms in their homes. The appeals court ought to overturn the lower court's decision and give the Sunshine State the ability to shine the light on what is going on in the secrecy of doctors’ offices."

I remember when my children were babies and we went for those well-baby visits.  Every time the doctor would ask about the paint in our house--did we have old paint on any walls which might contain LEAD, which is toxic?  I always said, "Absolutely not."  Of course this was done at the same time the doctor was injecting known toxins into my kids in their vaccines:  mercury, aluminum, formaldehyde, and more.  There clearly was a double standard when it came to exposing children to damaging poisons and two of my kids were vaccine injured.

Very little has changed except that it seems doctors are now promoting gun control.  I wonder when they'll figure out how to really keep children healthy.

Posted by Age of Autism at August 06, 2013 at 6:00 PM in Anne Dachel Permalink

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