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Clinical trial on Clinical and Immunological Investigations of Subtypes of Autism

Posted Mar 23 2010 10:00pm

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) have recently updated their webpage of featured clinical trials for autism. Many of the clinical trial recently discussed here at LeftBrainRightBrain are on that list. One that is on the featured list that I caught my eye is Clinical and Immunological Investigations of Subtypes of Autism . It is an old trial (started in 2006), but I thought it worth bringing up again.

The description is quoted below:

The purpose of this study is to learn more about autism and its subtypes. Autism is a developmental disorder in which children have problems with communication and social skills and display restricted interests and repetitive behaviors.

This study has several goals. One aim is to look at types of autism that are known, such as the regressive subtype, (where skills are lost). We will explore whether there is a unique change in immune functioning related to this subtype. Another aim is to serve as one of the sites that will pilot a larger natural history study, entitled Autism Phenome Project. The goal is to further understand autism by identifying other subtypes.

We will look at several types of medical issues that may be related to autism, including immunologic problems. Children will be followed over the course of several years. We aim to capture medical problems that may be related to autism as they develop, and study outcomes in areas such as behavior and language, in order to explore known and new subtypes of autism.

Normally developing children (aged 1) with autism (age 1, and developmental delays other than autism (age 1), may be eligible for this study.

Depending on each child’s study group and age, participants may undergo the following tests and procedures:

Baseline Visit

  • Medical and developmental history, physical examination, psychological, cognitive and medical tests to assess symptoms of autism or other developmental disorders, photographs of the child’s face, collection of hair, urine and baby teeth samples. If available, hair samples from the baby’s first haircut and from the biological mother’s hair are also collected.
  • Overnight electroencephalogram (EEG): A special cap with electrodes is placed on the child’s head to measure brain waves (brain electrical activity) while the child sleeps in the hospital overnight. Healthy volunteers do not undergo this procedure.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan: The child stays in the scanner, lying still for 10 to 15 minutes at a time. Since it may be difficult for the child to lie still, the test may be scheduled for a time when the child is likely to be sleepy, or the child may be sedated.
  • Lumbar puncture (for children in the autism). This test and the MRI may be done under sedation.

Follow-Up Visits

Follow-up visits are scheduled at different intervals, depending on study group, age and aspect of the study the child is enrolled in. The visits include a short interview session with the child’s caregiver and assessment of the child’s development and behavior. Some of the assessment measures used during the baseline examination are repeated, including symptoms ratings, behavioral tests and a blood test. For some children, the final visit will include repeats of the medical procedures.

The section that jumps out to my eye: We will explore whether there is a unique change in immune functioning related to this subtype. Another aim is to serve as one of the sites that will pilot a larger natural history study, entitled Autism Phenome Project. The goal is to further understand autism by identifying other subtypes.

Yes, the NIH is looking at whether regression and immune functioning might be linked. As noted above, this study has been ongoing for some time: the trial was first listed in 2006. But, hey, I figure if I forgot about this one and found it interesting, others might be interested in this as well.

If you want to reference this post in your site, use the code below to link to me from your website.

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