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Aging with intellectual disability

Posted Nov 25 2012 10:29pm

Care for the developmentally disabled has improved over recent generations and life and expectancy has increased. As a result, issues surrounding old age need more attention. Two studies out recently open the dialogue in two areas: hospice care and retirement options.

Advanced age and end of life concerns present areas often not focused upon by parent advocates with developmentally disabled children. There are many issues which are more immediate and time and energy are limited. But few parents will be present to advocate for their own children at end of life. These are prime examples of where listening to adults with DD and helping them advocate for changes will pay off in a better life for our kids.

Here are the abstracts:

Unique and universal barriers: hospice care for aging adults with intellectual disability .

Friedman SL, Helm DT, Woodman AC.
Abstract

Abstract As life expectancy of people with intellectual disability (ID) has increased, there has been a concurrent increase in age-related illnesses and conditions similar to that of the general population. These circumstances result in people with ID dying from typical life-ending conditions, and thus, they require similar end-of-life services such as palliative and hospice care. Although there are notable barriers to hospice for all, people with ID face additional challenges in accessing the benefits of these services. This article presents a review of the literature on these issues, underscoring the multiple challenges and the importance of a more collaborative approach between hospice and palliative care workers with people with ID, their families, and other important stakeholders.

PMID: 23167489 [PubMed - in process]

8. Am J Intellect Dev Disabil. 2012 Nov;117(6):497-508. doi: 10.1352/1944-7558-117-6.497.

Fesko SL, Hall AC, Quinlan J, Jockell C.
Abstract

Abstract As individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities become more engaged in community employment, it will be critical to consider how their employment experience changes as they age. Similar to other seniors, individuals will need to consider whether they want to maintain their employment, reduce their work commitment, or retire completely. If they do choose to retire, what activities will they choose to engage in, and what service or supports might be necessary? This article considers the issues faced by all aging workers in regard to retirement planning and active aging as well as specific strategies for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities to remain active and engaged. Recommendations for service options, policy consideration, and future research are also discussed.

PMID: 23167488 [PubMed - in process]
9. Am J Intellect Dev Disabil. 2012 Nov;117(6):455-63. doi: 10.1352/1944-7558-117.6.455



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