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Hemoglobin-a1c - Articles

Non-diabetics should have HBA1C checked by Dr. Gabe M. Medical Doctor Posted Wed 01 Oct 2008 8:12pm When your blood sugar level rises too high, sugar sticks to cells. Once on a cell, sugar cannot be removed and is converted to a poison called sorbitol that destroys the cell to damage arteries and cause heart attacks. HemoglobinA1C (HBA1C) measures how much sugar is attached to cell membranes. A study in the Archives of Internal Medicine (Volu ... Read on »
I'm not a diabetic; why did my doctor do an HBA1C test? by Dr. Gabe M. Medical Doctor Posted Wed 01 Oct 2008 8:12pm When your blood sugar level rises too high, sugar sticks to cells. Once on a cell, sugar cannot be removed and is converted to a poison called sorbitol that destroys the cell to damage arteries and cause heart attacks. HemoglobinA1C (HBA1C) measures how much sugar is attached to cell membranes. A study in the Archives of Internal Medicine (Volu ... Read on »
Recommended Diet for Diabetics M ... by Dr. Rubens D. Medical Doctor Posted Sat 20 Dec 2008 6:46pm Recommended Diet for Diabetics May Need Changing, Study Suggests By RONI CARYN RABIN 19 dec 2008--People with Type 2 diabetes on a high- fiberdiet kept their blood sugar under better control when they ate foods like beans and nuts instead of the recommended whole-grain diet, researchers have found. Beans and nuts are among foods that onl ... Read on »
Cardio Controversies: Tale of Two Equal LDLs and 17-fold MI Risk by Dr. B G Doctor of Pharmacy Posted Fri 11 Sep 2009 10:03pm 1 Comment Figure 2. Cox proportional hazards survival curves demonstrating time to acute MI for patients with a yearly calcium volume score change > 15% or < 15%. Callister et al, 2004 ATVB. TITLE: Progression of coronary artery calcium and risk of first myocardial infarction in patients receiving cholesterol-lowering therapy. Free PDF ... Read on »
Would YOU Have Done It? by John Shelmet Medical Doctor Posted Mon 01 Nov 2010 2:24pm You were disappointed. Your patient, showing a hemoglobin_A1c of 6.8% in April (2010), now shows an A1c of 7.6% (goal = 7.0% or under) at a visit in July 2010. She's also gained 5 pounds. You review the patient’s history. She’s 64 years old and you’ve followed her for 6 years. Her Type 2 diabetes was initially diagnosed 10 years ago. ... Read on »