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Cingulate Gyrus - Articles

Overfocusing: Cognitive Inflexibility and the Cingulate Gyrus by Broken Brilliant Patient Expert Posted Sun 25 Nov 2012 10:44am Reblogged from ADD . . . and-so-much-more: Part of ADD/ADHD Cormidities series Part one of Overfocusing (Dark gray links become obvious on mouse-over) Stubborn? or Stuck!! by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC As I said in the previous article entitled  ODD & Oppositional Rising : Most of us k ... Read on »
ADHD and Alcoholism: The Corpus Callosum (part 1) by Nicolas I. Patient Expert Posted Thu 22 Jan 2009 6:54pm In our last post, we discussed some of the ties between ADHD and eating disorders such as bulimia. In this post, we will begin the first of a multi-part investigation on the connection between ADHD and alcoholism. In this session, we will see how these two disorders are both tied to improper function in a key brain region known as the corpus call ... Read on »
Nicotine Withdrawal Effects Differ in ADHD Individuals by Nicolas I. Patient Expert Posted Thu 19 Feb 2009 6:26pm There is a relatively strong connection between ADHD and drug abuse, with nicotine being one of the most common types of "self-medication". It is believed that ADHD and nicotine addiction share similar neural pathways, although there still remains a fair amount of debate as to the exact underlying mechanisms at work between the two conditions. ... Read on »
Anxiety and Our Brains- Part 6: The Cortex by aimilino01 Patient Expert Posted Thu 29 Oct 2009 11:01pm The thinking part of the brain is a thick covering called the Cortex. It deals with social information: thinking about thinking and emotions, as well as thinking about what others are thinking and feeling.The following parts of the cortex are good to know about in relation to anxiety: The anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG), the filter and amplifi ... Read on »
Richer Fuller Lives: What Can We Learn from Einstein's Brain? by Al Fin .. Patient Expert Posted Tue 01 Jan 2013 12:49pm One of the more tragic aspects of human existence is the common loss of the brain's mental powers, just when a person has experienced enough of life to begin putting many of the pieces of the puzzle together. Exceptional brains appear to see more of the big picture earlier, and to exhibit a greater resistance to dementia in later life. Wh ... Read on »
Changes in brain gray matter in abstinent heroin addicts by Jason Schwartz, LMSW Healthy Living ProfessionalHealth Maven Posted Sat 17 Nov 2012 6:04am English: Middle frontal gyrus. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) A few years ago, Bill White called for research on the neurobiology of recovery . (He noted that all of our research efforts have been focused on understanding addiction without any research on understanding recovery.) Well, some Chinese researchers have made a contribution . ... Read on »
Corporal Punishment and Brain Development by Dr. Romeo V. Doctor of PhilosophyHealth Maven Posted Thu 23 Apr 2009 4:18pm A study published in the March, 2009 issue of Neuroimage examines the role of harsh corporal punishment in later brain development. While harsh corporal punishment (HCP) during childhood has been identified as a chronic, developmental stressor associated with depression, aggression and addictive behaviors, there is little about the potential neur ... Read on »
Primary progressive aphasia (non-fluent/agrammatic variant) in a patient with Pick disease by Dr. Brian M. Medical DoctorHealth Maven Posted Wed 14 May 2014 12:57pm I recently performed an autopsy on a 67-year-old man had a seven-year history of progressive difficulty with halting speech. His wife described him as seeming to be “groping for words”. Three years after initial presentation, he demonstrated profound difficulty both initiating and finishing sentences. His verbal communication was marked by jumb ... Read on »
Best Post of May 2014: Primary Progressive Aphasia (non-fluent/agrammatic variant) in a patient with Pick disease by Dr. Brian M. Medical DoctorHealth Maven Posted Mon 25 Aug 2014 8:12pm The next in our "Best of the Month" series is from May 14, 2014: I recently performed an autopsy on a 67-year-old man had a seven-year history of progressive difficulty with halting speech. His wife described him as seeming to be “groping for words”. Three years after initial presentation, he demonstrated profound difficulty both initiating an ... Read on »
Why does the herpes virus love the temporal lobes? by Dr. Brian M. Medical DoctorHealth Maven Posted Tue 03 Mar 2009 2:17pm 3 Comments After my recent lecture on infections of the CNS, Southern Illinois University medical student Mike Sinha came up to the podium to ask why the herpes virus had a predilection for attacking the temporal lobes. I passed Mike's question on to Dr. Tom Smith, the neuropathologist who provided the photographs (see above) of herpes encephalitis for Ro ... Read on »