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Bone Scans - Articles

CT Scan and Bone Scan by Daria Posted Tue 20 Apr 2010 12:00am Yesterday I went in for my CT scan and bone scan. First the CT scan and getting an IV. Finding a good vein in my left arm is getting to be a bit tricky so the nurse wrapped it with a hot towel, a hot pack and then some fabric to keep all that heat in. A few minutes later she took off the entire wrap. She got a vein first try … good job! She t ... Read on »
1March 4, 2010Diagnosis 2 -Clear Bone Scan and Liver Scan & Lung Xray by Nanay's daughter Posted Thu 04 Mar 2010 12:00am My brother in-law (Serafion), died of Bone Cancer a week before my mastectomy, and I have been suffering from joint pains for quite sometime. It made us all worried that the breast cancer may have spread or mestastasied to the bone.   However, my surgical oncologist informed us that there is no sign that I have bone canc ... Read on »
CT Scan and Bone Scan Results by Daria Posted Thu 29 Apr 2010 12:00am It wasn’t long before the door knock came and in walked my Onc. He asked me how I was feeling … do I have pain of any kind, how is the Xeloda treating me? I’m thinking to myself … enough of the small talk, give me the news. This is sort of how it went …  There are new growths on the liver …. blah blah blah … Xeloda no longe ... Read on »
Bone Scan Results by Laurie P. Patient ExpertHealth Maven Posted Fri 01 May 2009 10:03pm My bone scan came back negative for cancer. This is a huge relief for me. Now I think of my rib pain as a result of surgery rather than wondering if it is a cause for alarm. One bit of not-so-good news is that I have bone degeration in my cervical spine since my last bone scan 18 months ago. Studies show that women taking Femara lose bone density a ... Read on »
Isotope bone scan by Kamal S. Patient ExpertHealth Maven Posted Sat 16 Jan 2010 4:28pm I got my isotope bone scan yesterday. It was a fairly simple procedure. I went in at around 9:30 in the morning, paid a huge Rs. 3,500 and waited for my turn. I was injected with a small quantity of isotope, a clear liquid using a small syringe. It was around 10 a.m. then. I was asked to return at 3 in the afternoon for the gamma ray scan. ... Read on »
Bone scans in diagnosis of prostate cancer by Dr. Arnon Krongrad Medical Doctor Posted Wed 17 Sep 2008 1:52am A bone scan uses tiny amounts of radioactive materials called tracers (or properly “radionuclides”) that are injected into the patient. These tracers accumulate in certain organs and tissues, such as bones, and give off a type of radiation called “gamma” radiation. The gamma rays can be “seen” by using a special camera, which produces images that ... Read on »
Radioisotope shortage may impact availability of bone scans by Dr. Arnon Krongrad Medical Doctor Posted Wed 17 Feb 2010 12:00am For some time we have been monitoring a problem with the supply of the radioisotopes used in bone scans for patients suspected to have metastatic prostate cancer to their bones. Ther basic problem is that an old nuclear reactor in Ontario, Canada, which has long been the main source of an isotope called molybdenum-99 fo ... Read on »
Bone Scan by Kathy S. Patient Expert Posted Wed 01 Oct 2008 10:36pm S woke up early today to put L on the kindergarten bus as I had to leave early to get a morning injection of radioactive stuff to scintillate my bones for an afternoon bone scan. After my injection, I had time to go around the corner and downstairs to the radio-treatment area for my usual one minute dose of x-rays. Then I had time for a long wa ... Read on »
Bone Scan by Daria Posted Sat 24 Oct 2009 10:04pm Yesterday I had a bone scan done at the clinic. For a bone scan, a radioactive tracer substance is injected into a vein in the arm. The tracer then travels through the bloodstream and into the bones. Two different people made a total of four attempts to get this tracer into my veins. The problem was that after so many years of being p ... Read on »
Bone Scan by Daria Posted Wed 04 Nov 2009 10:04pm Yesterday I had a bone scan done at the clinic. For a bone scan, a radioactive tracer substance is injected into a vein in the arm. The tracer then travels through the bloodstream and into the bones. Two different people made a total of four attempts to get this tracer into my veins. The problem was that after so many years of being ... Read on »