Health knowledge made personal
Join this community!
› Share page:

what does a caregiver need to do for themselves when taking care of an alzheimer patient?


Posted by shay481

 
Answers (5)
Sort by: Newest first | Oldest first

Shay481,

The best way to take care of someone else is to take care of yourself. Don't neglect your health--get wellness checkups, eat properly, get as much uninterrupted sleep as you can and take some "me" time. Make a list of things you could use help with and when someone asks if there is anything they can do, look at the list and find something specific.

Don't give up everything you love! Seek respite care so you can continue with a favorite hobby or passtime. Also, know when to say when. If you are overwhelmed consider your options. Do you need someone to share the caregiving duties? You might consider family, friends, or hired help. Has caregiving gone beyond your capabilities? If so, begin the search for adult day care, assisted living, or long-term care.

Contact your local Alzheimer's Association Chapter to find out about support groups and resources available in your area. Don't try to do it alone--ask for help.

 I strongy believe in the role of humor as a healing balm for caregiver burnout. To see what I mean, see my blog:http://caregiverchronicle.blogspot.com/

Better yet, for a free sample of my ebook, "Dementia Diary, A Caregiver's Journal," see this website: http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/9565

Remember to laugh, even when you want to cry. I speak as the sole caregiver of my mother during her 16 year decline into dementia. Without humor, I'd have fallen apart. Try it, you'll like it.

If you're a "fixer," as I am, you'll be forever beating yourself up and second-guessing your caregiving methods. You'll feel deep remorse because you couldn't "fix-it." My Mom passed away 3 years ago and most days I'm still reminded of something I should have or could have done.

I'm working hard to "let go" of that attitude. I only wanted the best for my mom and did the best I could to take care of her every day. That was all I could have done, so right now I'm working on treating myself well, be thankful I was able to be there for Mom and knowing I did the very best I could to help her. So if you have any regrets about what you are doing or NOT doing to help your loved one, forgive yourself. You're doing the best you can under some stressful circumstances.

 

Learn, learn learn.  Family caregivers who access caregiver training classes can stay it it, with more joy and less stress, for nearly 2 extra years than those who don't get the training.  Fortunately, caregiver training is readily available through local Senior Centers, Alzheimer's Associations and even online over the internet (see some free training we offer at www.caringformom.com).  Families tell me all the time that learning even one or two new techniques "saved my life" as a caregiver.  What you do is important - learn all the tricks and tips you can to make it easier!
Agree with all the above, remember you can't take care of someone else so well, if you are not in good health and taking care of yourself first.
NOTICE: The information provided on this site is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your physician or other qualified health provider because of something you have read on Wellsphere. If you have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately.
Post an answer
Write a comment: