Health knowledge made personal
Join this community!
› Share page:
Go
Search posts:

Quitting Smoking and Anxiety

Posted Jan 16 2013 6:33am
A 21 mg dose Nicoderm CQ patch applied to the ...

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

A recent study finds that quitting smoking reduces anxiety:

 

The study followed 491 smokers attending NHS smoking cessation clinics in England. All participants were given a nicotine patch and attended eight weekly appointments.

Of the sample, 21.6% (106 people) had a diagnosed mental health problem, primarily mood and anxiety disorders.

All participants were assessed for their anxiety levels at the start of the research, and were also asked whether their motives for smoking were ‘mainly for pleasure’, ‘mainly to cope’ or ‘about equal’.

Six months after the start of the trial, 68 of the smokers (14%) had managed to quit smoking – 10 of these had a current psychiatric disorder. The researchers found a significant difference in anxiety between those who had successfully quit and those who had relapsed.

All of those who had quit smoking showed a decrease in anxiety. People who had previously smoked to cope showed a more significant decrease in anxiety compared to those who had previously smoked for pleasure.

 

However, some people who tried to quit and failed became more anxious:

 

Among the smokers who relapsed, those smoking for enjoyment showed no change in anxiety, but those who smoked to cope and those with a diagnosed mental health problem showed an increase in anxiety

 

I wonder if another study looking at the natural history of attempts to quit smoking may offer a little insight into that increase in anxiety:

 

Within the month of the study, 32% of smokers had multiple episodes of intentions to not smoke, and 64% transitioned among smoking as usual, abstinence, and reduction status on multiple occasions. When participants reported that they intended not to smoke the next day, 56% of the time they did not make a quit attempt the next day. Just under half (44%) of quit attempts occurred on days with no intentions to quit the night before. Most quit attempts (69%) lasted less than a day. Reduction in cigs/day was as common as abstinence.

 

It’s striking how fluid motivation and attempts to quit are. Relapses don’t mean I’m a smoker. Quitting is a process. Many smokers probably constantly evaluate their status in that process.

 

Related articles

 


Post a comment
Write a comment:

Related Searches