Health knowledge made personal
Join this community!
› Share page:
Go
Search posts:

Buprenorphine and emotional reactivity

Posted Jul 21 2013 7:11am

The following article was shared with me by a reader. Not surprisingly, the emphasized portion below caught my eye. [emphasis mine]

Abstract

Addictions to illicit drugs are among the nation’s most critical public health and societal problems. The current opioid prescription epidemic and the need for buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone®; SUBX) as an opioid maintenance substance, and its growing street diversion provided impetus to determine affective states (“true ground emotionality”) in long-term SUBX patients. Toward the goal of effective monitoring, we utilized emotion-detection in speech as a measure of “true” emotionality in 36 SUBX patients compared to 44 individuals from the general population (GP) and 33 members of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). Other less objective studies have investigated emotional reactivity of heroin, methadone and opioid abstinent patients. These studies indicate that current opioid users have abnormal emotional experience, characterized by heightened response to unpleasant stimuli and blunted response to pleasant stimuli. However, this is the first study to our knowledge to evaluate “true ground” emotionality in long-term buprenorphine/naloxone combination (Suboxone™). We found in long-term SUBX patients a significantly flat affect (p<0.01), and they had less self-awareness of being happy, sad, and anxious compared to both the GP and AA groups. We caution definitive interpretation of these seemingly important results until we compare the emotional reactivity of an opioid abstinent control using automatic detection in speech. These findings encourage continued research strategies in SUBX patients to target the specific brain regions responsible for relapse prevention of opioid addiction.

I started out skeptical of the methods and researchers, but, from what I can tell, the methods don’t seem to be fringe pseudoscience.

I don’t know what to make of the associations of Blum, it looks like he was involved in very important research on the genetics of alcoholism in 1990. Since then, it looks like he’s been involved in a lot of entrepreneurial ventures. Bios say that he’s on faculty at Department of Psychiatry and McKnight Brain Institute, but I could find no reference to him on  their website.

Berman appears to have a robust academic career  and is affiliated with NIAAA, VA, Boston University and ATTC.

The article was also peer reviewed.

What do you think?

Related articles

 


Post a comment
Write a comment:

Related Searches