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Girdlestone operation post operative and how to get around at home


Posted by morgan

 How does one get around after a girdlestone operation? Can one weight bear or sit?
 
Answers (13)
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I'm not a physician but my understanding is that moving around after this can be tiring..so what you can afterwards is likely to be related to what physical shape you were in before the surgery..

It's always best to ask your personal medical provider, who knows you best, what you can and can not do after surgery

first of all patient need a intrmittent skin or skeletal tractio gor at least 21 days to heel the soft tissue aroubd hip.this time knee exersize shoud start.then walking cruthces.raise the shoe heel of the operated limb 1 inch.

for more u can write  to openmind420@gmail.com

your reply seems to be very misleading ,as someone who has had girdlestone op i would like to saythat t takes up to 12 month for tissue around hip to start healing,knee excercise is not needed it is upper thigh strenghth that is needed,and majority of people cannot manage crutches,and use a frame indoors but need a wheelchair outside because of lack of strenghth and balance issues,also leg lenghth loss can be as much as 5 inches in some people and it is more common for loss to be approx 3 inch .Shoe raising at this height can be very uncomfortable and can bring problems of balance again,there is also the fact that every person copes with this disability in different ways and age plays a large factor in a persons recovery outcome.Hope this helps you to understand girdlestone op from a patients perspective.

It can be tough to distinguish between the truly green and the greenwashed, but with a little education and eventually with regulations, it will become clearer which companies are putting their money where their mouths are. Thanks for the information.

Regards,

Oximeters for home use

 

hello jaqckyp , greetings. read yr answer and want to get in touch with you . I also have had the girdlestone op in june 2010, and am facing many imbalance and very slow recovery issues, also the wound has not yet healed, though i was advise traction for 4 weeks which i did, i feel very hollow and have no strength, so far the leg has shortened by abt 2 ", not sure how much more it will shorten, if possible pls do reply yo my mail vipr62@gmail.com so that we cna share our healing process and options available to us.Also is there any forum of people with thsi problem to discuss out and share views. thks very much , best wishes & regards, vivek ( aged 48 yrs ) from India

I also would like to join a forum of people with this problem but after nearly 4 years in this condition I have found nothing.  As far as getting around is concerned I think it depends entirely on the individual, their health and attitude.   I find I can get around on crutches.  The main problem is that I can only walk slowly.  This is more of a problem for other people than me but it is impossible to concentrate on talking to someone whilst walking - its just easier to get around on your own.

 Annc from UK 73 years

 

There doesn’t seem to be much help or discussion on the post-op recovery, so the best advice would be to check back with your operating surgeon or therapist for the dos and do-nots.

Regards,

Hello to all:  I am considering this proceedure and have some questions for any who care to respond.  How long before I can resume some level of normal activity?  Will I be able to use the clutch on my car, or will I have to consider a different car?  I can use the clutch, now.  My femur is intact, but I have no socket.  It has deteriorated due to old cancer and radiation treatment.  My leg is about 1/2 inch to 1 inch shorter, now.  I have been told that there is not enough good pelvic bone to attach hip replacement parts to.  Thanks for your participation.   Wobbly.

Hi everyone,

I'm delighted to find a forum that I can say I well and truly belong in, not a common occurrence, as I was bilateral cdh, in plaster of paris from the waist down from 18months old and only learned how to walk when i was six.  Long story short after 5 hip revisions only on left side, I had a girdlestone in 1996 and to say i was petrified is an understatement.   The op went well, I was in traction for five weeks, but my problem stemmed from an unidentified infection and they took two weeks to concoct the right mix of antibiotics, which they inserted into the femur which was left, which measured approximately four inches, meaning I had a 4 inch shortening.   

The main difference was the lack of pain.   I went home after six weeks, used a zimmer for two weeks, but being the determined sod that i am, had a shoe lift ( i found that getting the full 4 inches was unmanageable - ankles twisting etc. ) of two and a half inches.    This meant that holding onto rails indoors helped, but really hurt my neck and shoulders if i exerted myself at all.   I am in constant pain and take painkillers every six hours, but have managed to walk around indoors with the aid of a stick.    A wheelchair if I have to go any real distance, but swim and yoga and pilates regularly help, as does a good massage!   Feel free to contact me direct on manning.roma335@googlemail.com if I can be of any assistance, just talking or emailing another girdlestone recipient would be a great help to me. 

 

Ancelo,

You make a very interesting point, people have considered me rude, but you're right!   The pain and concentration required for walking makes it absolutely impossible for me to  hold a decent conversation!

Already I feel so much better.........

Romatarot

My husband is facing this surgery, and we are so scared about it.  He has been fighting cancer for 11 years- prostate- that has gone to his bones and has invaded his pelvic bone. He's been in so much pain from a horrendous side effect to treatment (Radiation Induced Fibrosis that developed into hard fibrosis on his left upper thigh, front and back, and presses into major nerves- it's awful, extremely rare as no doctor we've ever talked to has even ever SEEN this before- and it hurts to walk, sit, and lie down). So along the way, his right leg started hurting, and we though it was more tumor activity, but after a TON of scans, we've learned a couple weeks ago that he actually had managed to severely fracture his right hip, but because he didn't realize that had happened, he continued to hobble around on it, and in the process destroyed the femoral ball and the entire socket. It's just a mess- terribly upsetting turn of events to say the least.....

Anyway- since the pelvic bone is so involved, they don't feel a hip replacement would be a worthwhile venture as it probably wouldn't heal properly, so they just want to do a salvage procedure (the resection- girdlestone I suppose it is...) to relieve the pain.

I am thankful to have found this forum as it has been so difficult to find any real information on this procedure and others' experiences.

Any feedback at all would be so very helpful. I am so worried that if he takes this final step, his days of mobility will be completely over. :-(( He is 61 and outside of cancer in excellent health. We are feeling very robbed of quality of life.

GW in Cincinnati

Good afternoon,

On May 3, 2011 my father who is 83 y/o had a hip replacement surgery. Unfortunately, he got bacteria (pseudomonas) at the O.R. and the surgeon somehow damaged the nerve of his leg so he does not have sensation or movement of his foot. After 5 surgeries, 60 lbs lighter (skins and bones), several bed sores, 9 months under antibiotics IV and 7 months between hospitals and rehabs, he was able to go back home. On Feb. 10, 2012 they did the last surgery when they performed the girdle stone. As of now he is not able to walk, he gives steps with a walker or at the parallels but he needs to be assisted. The leg is very heavy and stiff, he cannot lift it by himself, and therefore he needs assistance to get out of bed and in bed. He feels worthless, hopeless, depress because he completely depends of others to even go to the bathroom. My father used to be an athlete, retired civil engineer who was always very active, independent. We know he will never the same who was before the surgery on May 3, 2011 but, does anyone has experience similar situation as my father  and things has improves after 12 months post surgery? At least that he will be able to go to the bathroom by himself and can get out/in of bed by himself. Please, any advice to make help my father with this transition. Thank you.

Good afternoon, 

On May 3, 2011 my father who is 83 y/o had a hip replacement surgery. Unfortunately, he got bacteria (pseudomonas) at the O.R. and the surgeon somehow damaged the nerve of his leg so he does not have sensation or movement of his foot. After 5 surgeries, 60 lbs lighter (skins and bones), several bed sores, 9 months under antibiotics IV and 7 months between hospitals and rehabs, he was able to go back home. On Feb. 10, 2012 they did the last surgery when they performed the girdle stone. As of now he is not able to walk, he gives steps with a walker or at the parallels but he needs to be assisted. The leg is very heavy and stiff, he cannot lift it by himself, and therefore he needs assistance to get out of bed and in bed. He feels worthless, hopeless, depress because he completely depends of others to even go to the bathroom. My father used to be an athlete, retired civil engineer who was always very active, independent. We know he will never the same who was before the surgery on May 3, 2011 but, does anyone has experience similar situation as my father  and things has improves after 12 months post surgery? At least that he will be able to go to the bathroom by himself and can get out/in of bed by himself. Please, any advice to make help my father with this transition. Thank you.
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